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Historic Quincy's Hometown Weekly Newspaper 





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St. Ann's School Salutes Heroes 

Page 16 
Granite Fountain Dedicated 

Page 1 7 






The Quincy 



Historic Quinc\;'s Hometown Weekly Newspaper Since 1968 




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VOL. 41 No. 42 



Thursday, July 2, 2009 




QUINCY TROOP 42 Boy Scouts and leaders display the Na- 
tional 9/11 Flag which thej carried in the 58th annual Quincy 
Flag Day Parade. The 32-foot American flag was partially de- 
stroyed when the Twin Towers collapsed in New York on Sept. 
11, 2001. The flag was stitched back together over the 9/11 
Anniversary last year by residents of Greensburg, Kansas, a 
town 95 percent destroyed by an EF-5 Tornado in 2007. Troop 
42 has made some minor repairs to the stitching and will escort 
the flag on the field at Fenway Park for the National Anthem 



before the Red Sox game against the Seattle Mariners Friday 
night, July 3. Julia Mudloff coordinated the Quincy display. 
She is a former firefighter/paramedic and volunteer with New 
York Says Thank You Foundation which is coordinating Na- 
tional 9/11 Flag Tour this summer. Boy Scouts from around 
the country are displaying the historic flag at public gathering 
places nationwide. Quincy Boy Scouts also helped display the 
flag outside the Crane Library on Flag Day, June 14. 

Quincy Sun Photo, Kohert Sohle 



Former Cong. Joseph Kennedy To Represent Family 

Senior Center Dedication Today 



The city's first-ever se- 
nior center will be opened 
to the public and dedicated 
with a ceremony today 
(Thursday) at 4 p.m. when 
the former Myles Standish 
School formally becomes 
the Kennedy Center. 

"Our city's seniors now 
have the place to call their 
own they have deserved for 
many, many years," Mayor 
Tom Koch said. "This would 
not be possible without the 
hard work of a lot of people, 
and 1 could not be prouder 
or more grateful to all the 
people who came together 
to turn a tired city building 




KENNEDY SENIOR CENTER, located at the site of the for- 
mer Myles Standish School on East Squantum Street in North 
Quincy, will be officially dedicated today (Thursday) at 4 p.m. 

Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble 



into a first-class facility." 

Former Cong. Joseph 
Kennedy is scheduled to 
represent his family at the 
dedication ceremony to- 
day. The center is named m 
honor o\ the Kennedy fam- 
ily, and a photomontage 
honoring President John F. 
Kennedy and his brothers 
Joseph, Robert and Edward 
will also be unveiled at the 
ceremony. 

The Kennedy Center 
will be the first centralized 
location to house programs 
offered by the Department 
of Elder Services, which 
Cont'd On Pdi-e 12 



Council Narrowly Rejects Noise Limits 



City Councillors Monday 
rejected a revised anti-noise 
ordinance by a 4-5 vote 
in their final action before 
summer recess. 

Monday's vote ended 
months of acrimonious de- 
bate over acceptable levels 
of noise and a noise ordi- 
nance, particularly when 
business districts interact 
with residential areas. 

Ward I Councillor l^o 
Kelly cast the decisive vote, 
opposing the measure which 
hj had supported on June 
15. 



After the meeting, Kelly 
said he'd thought about the 
issue since his original vote, 
and decided the ordinance 
was not appropriate. 

Ward 6 Councillor Brian 
McNamee, architect of the 
original anti-noise proposal, 
introduced the issue Mon- 
day as "an important ordi- 
nance for the city and Ward 
6 as well " 

The ordinance amended 
by Councillor John Keenan 
on June 15 would have set 
different decibel limits, 
ranging from 55 to 67, on 



allowable noise during day- 
time, evening and overnight 
hours, 1 1 p.m. to 7 a.m.. and 
provided no fines until the 
results were examined by a 
committee in September. 

Keenan submitted the 
amendment during the coun- 
cil' reconsideration of a pre- 
vious anti-noise ordinance 
which .set allowable decibel 
levels at 75 for days and 
65 for nights, ten decibels 
higher than levels proposed 
by McNamee. McNamee s 
original proposal set noise 
limits of 65 decibels for da> s 



and 55 decibels at night 
when it was introduced in 
February. 

However, that ordinance 
was amended b> Councillor 
Michael McFarland to allow 
limits of 75 and 65. levels. 

McNamee and Ma\or 
Thomas Koch determined 
the new levels were too high 
and the ordinance was re- 
considered on June I 5. 

On June 15. council- 
lors approved the revised 
ordinance with Kecnan's 
amendment by a 5-4 vote. 
Con! (I On /V/v,'<' '^ 





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$8.3 Million Reduction; 
Council OKs $226M Budget 

City's State 

Aid Slashed 

By 19 Percent 



ByLALRAGRlFFI.N 

Quincy "s local aid was 
slashed by S8.3 million or 
\9'/( in the state s 2010 bud- 
get signed Monda\ b\ (jo\- 
ernor Deval Patrick 

Ihe current Local Aid 
Estimates released hs 
the state's Department of 
Revenue on the so-called 
Cherry Sheet designates 
$34,749,705 tor Quincy in 
contrast to the current year's 
local aid of $43 .07 1.093 

"They really whacked 
us," Chris Walker, the po!ic> 



director for .Mavor Ihomas 
Koch, said ot the local aid 
total which is over Si mil- 
lion lower than cil> otticials 
projected. 

Patrick signed the bud- 
get near!) a ueek after Citx 
Council approved the citvs 
2010 budget which hudiiet- 
ed a \y^( cut m IcKal aid 

Before the vote, council- 
lors discussed the chaotic 
signals from Beacon Hill 
and agreed Xo further budget 
review in the fall. 



iOntJ On / fic'i 




ROC KE T'S RKl) (JLARK - Km works lijihl up the sk> oxer 
Dorchester Bay last Saturda> night as part of Squantum s 
Centennial Celebration. .Activities planned this Saturday in- 
clude a Kamil> Fun l)a> at the Squantum School from noon to 
5 p.m. and the Fourth of .Juh Parade featuring antique cars, 
floats, motorcycles and hands of all shapes and sizes. 

Oiiiih\ Sun l'l,i>!f Riihfi- \,>' \ 



I III mil llllllll II limil ^^^"P ^y®® Wollaston Theater R estoration - Page 2 ♦ Care Package Drive For Troops - Page 32 

■o 4 8 7 « "o 8 8 1 '■" » 1 



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Pa^'2 'Sitii ^iv&icy Axtxk Thursday iiuly'^iitiw 



Nonprofit Group To Lead Efforts To Restore WoUaston Theater 



Mayor Thomas Koch 
has recruited Hollywood 
producer and Quincy na- 
tive Kris Meyer to help lead 
a non-profit group that will 
spearhead effort* to restore 
the Wollaston Theater after 
the building's recent sale 
saved it from the wrecking 
ball. 

At the mayor's request, 
the city's downtown rede- 
velopment partner, Street- 
Works Development, 
bought the 77-year old the- 
ater to preserve it from de- 
struction ad allow time for 
a non-profit group to begin 
restoration efforts. 

With the sale finalized 
in recent weeks, Koch said 
planning for "The Wolly's" 




and I could see he was se- 
rious about it even then. So 
I am thrilled to be a part of 
this," Meyer said. "I grew 
up watching movies there, I 
still have a deep connection 
to it, and I truly believe it has 
the potential to be a magical 
place once again." 

The nonprofit group, the 
Wollaston Theater Founda- 



terest in seeing this through. 
1 am excited to get started." 
The I aOO-seat Wol- 
laston Theater wac built in 
1926, and was added to the 
National Register of Histor- 
ic Places in 1989. Its most 
recent owner, Arthur Chan- 
dler, owned and operated 
the theater from 1977 until 
his death this year. His pass- 



White House Wreath 
To Honor John Quincy Adams 



A wreath from The 
White House will be placed 
on the tomb of President 



THE WOLLASTON THEATRE on Beale Street - a local landmark - will be the focus of a res- 
toration effort led by a nonprofit group. The group's ultimate goal is to revive "The WoUy" as a 
full-service theater hosting movies, concerts and stage performances. 

Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble 

potential revival would be- ter and Bobby Farrelly, co- 
gin in earnest. produced hit comedies such 
"The real work begins as "The Heartbreak Kid," 
now," said Koch. "We be- "Stuck On You" and "Me, 
lieve the potential is there to Myself and Irene." Most 



dents on their birthdays. 

In the case of President 
John Quincy Adams, the 



tion, will be charged with ing prompted the building's 

raising money, securing sale, 
grants, defining what the Street- Works Partner 

specific uses for the theater Richard Heapes said that 

can and will be. The ultimate the company always looks 

goal is to revive The WoUy for ways to contribute to the 

as a full service theater that communities it partners with 

can host movies, concerts on development projects, 
and stage performances. "The Mayor approached 

Mark Carey, executive us and asked that we take 

director of Discover Quincy a look at it, and I am happy 

and the Quincy Film bureau, that it worked out," Heapes 

will also play a major role said, 
in the restoration effort. He Ward 5 City Councillor 

said the formal paperwork Douglas Gutro called secur- 

creating the non-profit will ing the building from the 

be filed within the next sev- wrecking ball and the forma- 



John Quincy Adams, the wreath is presented by the true gem for Wollaston and documentary on former star 

all of Quincy. But make no Red Sox pitcher Luis Tiant 



bring back The WoUy as a recently, Meyer produced a gral days, and added that a tion of a non-profit a "very 



sixth President of the Unit- U.S. Navy. Lt. Commander 
ed States, in a ceremony Christopher Orlowski and 
Friday, July 10 at noon at members of the U.S. Navy 



United First Parish Church, 
"Church of the Presidents," 
1306 Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. 

This tradition began dur- 



Color Guard will present 
the wreath in the name of 
the President of the United 
States. 

The ceremony marks the 



mistake; it is going to re- 
quire a major community- 
wide effort to make this hap- 
pen. And the non-profit will 
be looking at every possible 
resource along the way." 



and his emotional return trip 
to his native Cuba entitled 
"The Lost Son of Havana." 
"I first had a conversa- 
tion about restoring the 
WoUy with Mayor Koch 



website , www.woUastonthe- 
ater.com . will be launched 
to provide information on 
the effort. 

"We are poised to make 
this happen," Carey said. 



welcome step forward" for 
the neighborhood. 

"The WoUy means a lot 
to the neighborhood, and it 
could be a tremendous new 
asset to Wollaston Center. 



Meyer. A producer for the four or five years ago when 
acclaimed comedy duo Pe- he was Park Commissioner, 



"From talking to people in I look forward to working 

the industry, in the business closely with the Mayor's 

community and residents. Office and the nonprofit on 

there is just a tremendous in- this project," Gutro said. 



ing President Lyndon John- 242nd birth date anniversary 

son'stermof office whereby of the sixth President of the a rj 1 A J /^1 r» 

a wreath is sent to the resting United States who was bom At ManCOCK Ancl Cnapman StreCtS 

place of all deceased Presi- July 11, 1767. -g-, i • r^ i i r^ ■■rv i» a» ■mm- t 

Frankie Sablone Square Dedication Monday 



tOVt'* fRtSu, 



Burke's Seafood 



THE AREA'S LEADING FISH MARKET 
& TAKE OUT RESTAURANT 



EVERYDAY SPECIAL 



Friep Fish ^ Chips I^innier 



2 pes. Scrod, 
Fries & Coleslaw 



6.99 



Save »2«' 
Served All Day 



Phone Orders Welcome 

See our complete menu at www.burkesseaffood.com 
61 BilUngs Road • North Quincy • 617-479-1540 

Hours: Tues-Thur 9-6:30, Fri 9-7, Sat 9-6 Closed Sun & Man 



Frankie Sablone came to 
Quincy from the Wrentham 
State School some 35 years 
ago, a friendly young man 
in his 40s to wash dishes in 
what was then the Hollow 
Restaurant. 

He remained to become a 
Quincy institution. 

Next Monday, July 6, 
at 4 p.m., the intersection 
of Hancock and Chapman 
Streets, around the comer 
from his home in the Tobin 




FRANKIE SABLONE 

Towers senior housing com- 
plex, will be dedicated in his 
memory, "Frankie Sablone 
Square." 

When Frank Sablone 



COA In Need Of Bath Seats 

The Council on Aging is If you have one to do- 

in urgent need for bath seats nate, call the COA at 617- 
for senior citizens. 376-1245. 




died May 1 , the City Coun- 
cil thought enough of him to 
offer up a moment of silence 
and dedicated their meeting 
in his honor. 

But few could remem- 
ber his last name. He was 
always "just Frankie" to 
the hundreds of people he 
befriended, particularly the 
police officers who watched 
over him as he made his dai- 
ly rounds of coffee shops. 

Shortly after his death 
at the age of 75, and for the 
first time ever, the Quincy 
Housing Authority and the 
State Department of Men- 
tal Retardation held a well- 
attended celebration of his 



life at Tobin Towers. 

City Councillor Doug 
Gutro, who proposed nam- 
ing the intersection for 
Frankie, noted that his fam- 
ily came from the North 
Shore but Frankie chose 
Quincy for his retirement. 

"He always said he 
loved Wollaston so much 
he wouldn't leave," said 
Gutro. 

The dedication will be 
followed by Gutro's annual 
Clay Street Cookout - ham- 
burgers, hot dogs, chips and 
drinks behind Tobin Tow- 
ers at 80 Clay St. - around 
the comer from Frankie Sa- 
blone Square. 




Sunday 6:00pm to 10:00pm with Entertainer Donnie Norton 






The ADAMS PUB & DECK is Now Open 

Serving Lunch and Dinner featuring 
Burgers, Steaktips, Lobsters and much more! ! ! 

Overlooking the Beautiful Neponset River and Sunsets 
I "CIGAR NIGHT" Every Friday with "El Tiante'' Cigars | 

Now Booking Weddings, Functions or Meetings in the Constitution Room 



Gemologist 



BY Jeffrey M. Bertman 

GRADUATE GEMOLOGIST 



THE KING OF THE GEMSTONES 



Hest Western Adilms Inn • 29 Hancock St. Quincv, Ma 02170 • 617-328-1500 



Ruby, the birthstone for July, is 
the red variety of the mineral co- 
rundum, which also includes sap- 
phire. Since ancient times, this rare 
red gemstone has been regarded as 
the "king of the gcmstones," with 
good reason. Fine rubies are rarer 
than diamonds, emeralds, or sap- 
phires, and their color is incompa- 
rable. Rubies are also surprisingly 
durable. In fact, on the famous 
Mohs hardness scale of 1 to 10, 
where diamond rates a 10, rubies 
are second only to diamond with 
a 9 rating. All these characteris- 
tics combine to make fine rubies 
among the most expensive of all 
gems. Rubies have also long been 
regarded as having mystical pow- 
ers and are said to bring the wearer 
romance, friendship, energy, cour- 
age, and peace. 



'R?9^ 



Who could dispute the allure 
of the mesmerizing ruby? Once 
thought to ensure a peaceful life, 
ruby could protect any place that 
housed it from theft, and home and 
garden would be unhurt by storms. 
While we make no guarantees for 
the mystical properties of ruby, 
we do believe it has the ability to 
captivate. Come see our selection 
of this gemstone that was once re- 
served for wearing only by kings. 
You'll make that special person 
in your life feel like royalty when 
you shop or custom-design Jewelry 
with us at 1402 Hancock Street, 
Quincy Center. PH: 617-773-3636. 
We also offer expert repair and res- 
toration services. 

Don 't Forget: we pay cash for 
Gold - Platinum - Diamonds... 
highest prices paid. 

www.rog«niJ«vir«lry.com 



TI|nrs<Jay,July2,20Q9 Thfi.Qiaij»cy Suig Page 3 



Concourse Project 

Tenant Hold-Out Blocks 
Quincy Fair Demolition 



By LAURA GRFFIN 

One last tenant holdout is 
delaying the demolition of 
Quincy Fair Mall, according 
to Kevin Madden, Assistant 
City Solicitor. 

Madden told City Coun- 
cil Monday that his office 
has filed court papers in an 
effort to evict the lone ten- 
ant who is delaying demo- 
lition plans for 1563-1597 
Hancock St. 

"All of the tenants have 
vacated except one," said 
Madden, adding, "We are in 
court on that taking." 

The demolition is sched- 
uled to allow completion of 
the Crosstown Concourse, 
a single four-lane East- 
West roadway from Granite 
Street to Southern Artery 
with direct access to Burgin 
Parkway. 

City officials and New 
York developer StreetWorks 
consider the Concourse a 
key to the revitalization of 
Quincy Center. 

After Monday's meeting. 
Madden said, "The (demo- 
lition) bids are in. At some 
point we have to move for- 
ward." 

Madden said it is essen- 



tial to settle the issue as the 
state is ready to advertise 
bids for the roadwork in the 
fall, "We are running out of 
time." 

For the court case. Mad- 
den asked councillors to 
provide updated confirma- 
tion of the city's eminent 
domain order filed last May. 

In May 2008, City Coun- 
cil approved a $2,010,000 
purchase price which re- 
quires the complete demo- 
lition of the building and 
gives the city all rights to 
10% of the land. 

In response to Ward 2 
Councillor Daniel Ray- 
mond, Madden said the 
building's former owners, 
Messina Enterprises, have 
three years to challenge the 
purchase price. 

Regardless of a chal- 
lenge, the city takes posses- 
sion once the eminent do- 
main order is issued. 

"This is not going into 
litigation," Madden said of 
the property. 

City Council President 
Jay Davis said he looked 
forward to the razing of the 
building which will bring 
light to the project and allow 



people to better envision the 
Concourse. 

Davis, also, asked wheth- 
er the city had received any 
rents from tenants since as- 
suming ownership. 

Madden said those issues 
are open to negotiation and 
a tenants' relocation funds 
can not be tapped for rent. 

"Our goal is to work with 
everybody," said Madden 




COMMUNITY POLICE OFFICER James Dentremont was recently commended by City Coun- 
cil for his outstanding work ser>ing that neighborhood for the past ten years. Dentremont was 
transferred to the Special Investigations Unit this month. Ward 2 Councillor Daniel Raymondi 
presented the commendation to Dentremont after Ward 2 community leaders described his dili- 
gent work and dedication on their behalf. From left are Rev. Ann Suzedell, pastor, Quincy Point 
Congregational Church; Zaida Shaw, Past President, Ward 2 Civic Association, Dentremont; 
Raymondi, Brad Croall, president. Ward 2 Civic Association and Paul Battarian, Executive 
Director, 1000 Southern Artery. Qutty \ Sun Photo Uiura (injfm 



CliffWalk 2 Hearings Delayed Until September 



TRASH 
NOTICE 

Trash will be on a 
regular pick-up schedule 
for the week of July 6th 

Capitol Waste Services y Inc. 



PAYING TOP DOLLAR 

for your unwanted jewelrj! 



^.y li!^^ ' --i 



'V' -i^ ^ 



APPRAISING, 
BUYING & 
SELLING... 



Del Greco 




^(Wfe^ 



399 WASHINGTON STREET ROUTE 53 ' WEYMOUTH 
LOCATED OFF RT. 3. EXIT 16A. TO RT. 53N 

♦ 781.337.5069 

Hours: Monday - Friday 9 - 5 • Saturday 9:30 - 2 



City Council will sched- 
ule new hearings on Cliff- 
Walk 2 in September under 
an agreement reached ear- 
lier this month with the de- 
velopment firm, CJ Willard 
Street, LLC and CJ Willard 
Street, II, LLC. 

Bryan Connolly, the at- 



torney representing the de- 
velopers, asked the Planning 
Board earlier this month to 
defer decisions on the mat- 
ter until on or before Sept. 
30. 

In his letter to Planning 
Director Dennis Hamngton, 
Connolly said the developers 



plan to engage in additional 
meetings with the neighbors 
to discuss the application. 

Connolly represented the 
firm on March 2 when City 
Council onginally consider 
the request for a Special 
Permit for a 96-unit addition 
to he CliffWalk apartment 



complex on V\i]lard Street 

At that time, more than 
a dozen residents urged 
councillors to reject the per- 
mit. Since then, the homes 
along Willard Street (Route 
37) sport "NoClifnValk 2"" 
lawn signs. 



Tlxe Quinc^r &^^ 

Route Available: WOLLASTON 

We are looking for a new carrier to take an open 
route in Wollaston. 

The route is in the area of Royal St., 

Cummings Ave. Vassall St., Beach St., 

Channing St., and Bromfield St. 

The route is available starting Wednesday, July 8th 

If interested, please call Donna at 617-471-3100. 



Tlie Q-u.ixic3r S^N^ 

Route Available: SQUANTUM 

We are looking for a new carrier to 

take a large, open route in Squantum. 

The route is in the area of Middlesex St., 

Wedgewood St.. Monmouth St., Bellevue Rd.. 

Gladstone St., Bay side Rd.. Bayberrv Rd.. 

Ocean Ave. and Knollw(x)d Rd. 

The route is available starting Wednesday, July 8th 
If interested, please call Donna at 617-471-3100. 



Searching for a safe 
harbor for money 
you cant afford to lose? 



You don't want your money anywhere near 
the market right now, and "under the 
mattress" isn't a great option either. Here's 
an idea: Come to Colonial Federal Savings 
Bank and open a "Safe Harbor" CD. You get 
a guaranteed rate while you wait for today's 
financial storms to blow over. You don't 
have to open a checking account or move 
your Direct Deposit to qualify. And your 
savings are now insured to $250,000 by 
the FDIC. Secure, "sleep-at-night" accounts 
are perfect for anxious times like these. 
Come see us. Or call 617-471-0750. 




I -Year Certificate 



1.90 



% 



APY 




COLONIAL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS BANK 

"Your neighborhood bank!" 

QUINCY: IS Beach Street 617-471-0750 • 1000 Southern Artery (Residents only) 617-479-1430 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin Street 781-767-1776 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Middle & Washington Streets 781-331-1776 • wwwcolonialfed.com 

Insured FDIC 



LENDER 



Some additional focts: $1000 minimum opening deposit and to obtain stated APY. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) accurate as of 06/03. 09 
and subject to change. Penalty for early withdrawal. Your account with us is insured to $250,000 by the FDIC through 12/3113. 



Page 4 Tl&« Quix^ioy Sun Thursday, July 2» 2009 



The Qviincy 




(USPS 453-060) 

Published Weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co., Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

RoImiI H. Boaworth 

Publisher and Editor 

Hanry W. Boaworth, Jr. 

Founder 
1968-2009 

50c per copy. $25 00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$30.00 per year by mail outside Quincy - $38.00 out-of-state 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 Fax: 617-472-3963 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to: 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

The Oulncy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in 
advertisements but will reprint ttiat part of an advertisement in wtiicti the typographical 
error occurs 





I I s: 



By Henry Bosworth 



A Day Of Irony 




Moments 
in time 



THE HISTORY CHANNEL 



• On July 4, 1826, John 
Adams and Thomas Jeffer- 
son, the second and third 
presidents of the United 
States, die on the 50th an- 
niversary of the adoption of 
the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence. Both men had been 
central in the drafting of the 
historic document. 

• On June 30, 1859, 

Jean-Francois Gravelet be- 
comes the first daredevil to 
walk across Niagara Falls on 
a tightrope 160 feet above 
the Niagara gorge. Wearing 
pink tights and a yellow tu- 
nic, Blondin crossed a cable 
about 2 inches in diameter 
and 1,100-feet long with 
only a balancing pole. 

• On July 5, 1865, in 

the East End of London, 
revivalist preacher William 
Booth and his wife Cath- 
erine establish the Christian 
Mission, later known as 
the Salvation Army. Soup 
kitchens were the first in a 
long line of various projects 
designed to provide physi- 
cal and spiritual assistance 
to the destitute. 

• On July 3, 1908, writ- 
er Mary Frances Keimedy 
Fisher is bom in Albion, 
Mich. She was highly pro- 
ductive writer, producing 
nine books on food, includ- 
ing "How to Cook a Wolf 
(1942). 



• On July 2, 1937, the 

Lockheed aircraft carrying 
American aviator Amelia 
Earhart and navigator Fred- 
erick Noonan is reported 
missing near Howland Is- 
land in the Pacific. The 
pair was attempting to fly 
around the worid, and no 
trace of them has ever been 
found. 

•On July 1,1941, NBC 

broadcasts the first TV com- 
mercial to be sanctioned by 
the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission. Adver- 
tiser Bulova paid $9 to ad- 
vertise its watches on the 
air during the broadcast of a 
Dodgers-Phillies game. 

• On June 29, 1995, the 

Sampoong department store 
in Seoul, South Korea, col- 
lapses due to construction 
errors, killing more than 
500 people. In the middle 
of construction, the owner 
insisted that an extra floor 
with a swimming pool 
be added. Seoul's official 
plaiming department was 
not advised of the change 
and safety inspectors were 
bribed. When the fifth-floor 
ceiling showed signs of im- 
minent collapse, the only 
preventive measure taken 
was to move expensive mer- 
chandise out of the way. 

O 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 





ADAMS 



JEFFERSON 



Black Creek's Newsletter 

Publication Suspended; 

Publisher Diagnosed With Cancer 



William G. Aylward, 
publisher of Black's Creek, 
a semimonthly local paper 
of news and letters, an- 
nounces he was diagnosed 
Jime 3 at Milton Hospital 
with Metatastic type four 
colon cancer. 

COA In Need 
Of Bath Seats 

The Council on Aging is 
in urgent need for bath seats 
for senior citizens. 

If you have one to do- 
nate, call the COA at 617- 
376-1245. 



As a result, Aylward said 
he has suspended publica- 
tion of Black's Creek, until 
further notice. 

Black's Creek first start- 
ed publication in November 
1994 and has continued un- 
interrupted through May 3 1 
of this year. 

"At this time, Black's 
Creek would like to thank 
its subscribers and advertis- 
ers for their loyal support 
and encouragement over the 
years," Aylward said in a 
prepared statement released 
to The Quincy Sun. 



(Editor's Note: As our nation prepares to celebrate In- 
dependence Day Saturday, July 4th, we find it appropriate 
to re -run one of Henry Bosworth's favorite Sunbeams' col- 
umns: A Day of Irony. The column, which first appeared in 
July 1992. has been updated. ) 

July 4"", you could say, is a day of irony in American his- 
tory. 

America was bom on July 4"", 1776 and the two men who 
played major roles in that historic event also died on July 
4h-50 years later. 

This Saturday marks the ZBS*" anniversary of the Decla- 
ration of Independence 
- America's birth cer- 
tificate - and the 183"^ 
anniversary of the death 
of two main architects- 
Thomas Jefferson and 
our own John Adams. 

Adams, like Jeffer- 
son, was a super pa- 
triot. 

Certainly a much better patriot than he was a prognosti- 
cator. He predicted July 2'^-not July 4'''-would be celebrated 
through the years as America's birth date. 

Adams made that erroneous prediction in a letter to Abi- 
gail Adams dated July 2, 1776. In the letter sent from Phila- 
delphia to Abigail here in Quincy, he declared: 

"The second day of July, 1776 will be the most memo- 
rable epoch in the history of America." 

The man, who would become second president after 
George Washington, thought this because the Declaration 
of Independence was adopted by 12 states on July 2. But, it 
wasn't signed by anyone until July 4. 

And, only two of the 55 signers actually affixed their sig- 
natures on July 4*. One was Quincy-bom John Hancock, 
who as President of the Second Continen- 
tal Congress, was the first to sign. 

Most of the others signed the precious 
document Aug. 2. But six signed after that. 
And Thomas McKean of Delaware didn't 
get around to it imtil five years later. 

Jefferson and Hancock usually get top 
billing in history books when it comes to 
the Declaration of Independence. Jeffer- 
son as its author and Hancock as its first 
signer. 

Hancock's signature-bold and with a fancy flourish so 
"King George III can see it without his spectacles" probably 
is the most famous autograph in this country's history. 

But Adams played a key, if not as glamorous a role, in 
putting the Declaration together and getting it adopted. 

Jefferson himself acknowledged that when he praised 
Adams as ". . .the most efficient agent in procuring a public 
Declaration of Independence." 

And then that ironic day -July 4*, 1826 - the 50"" anniver- 
sary of the Declaration of Independence when both Adams 
and Jefferson died. 

Adams was stricken here in Quincy in his favorite wing 
chair in his second floor study at the Adams mansion, on 
Adams Street. Known as the Old House, this was the home 
of four generations of the illustrious Adams family and the 
summer White House of the second president and his son, 
John Quincy Adams, the sixth president. 

Adams and Jefferson, once close allies, had a falling out 
but reconciled in later years through the efforts of Abigail 
as a peacemaker. 

Among Adams' last words as he lay dying were "Jeffer- 
son survives." 

He thought Jefferson had outlived him. But actually Jef- 
ferson had died earlier that same day at Monticello in Vir- 
ginia at age 83. 

News traveled slowly in those days, long before radio 
and television. There were no such things as instant news 
bulletins. 

COA Seeking Wheelchairs 




ABIGAIL 



If there were, just imagine the flurry all day as the media- 
especially cable TV-staked out the Adams Mansion here and 
Monticello in Virginia. 

Adams was just three months and 15 days from his 91" 
birthday. He survived Abigail , his wife of 54 years, by eight 
years. 

But he had lived to see his son, John Quincy Adams, be- 
come president in 1 825 . 

The latter was in Washington when his 
father died and did not know of his death 
until several days later. 

Abigail, the first woman to be the wife 
of one U.S. president and the mother of a 
second never knew that second honor. 

Four days before he died, Adams was 
asked to give a 50"' anniversary July 4"" 
toast to his fellow Quincy residents. The 
old man replied: 

"I will give you independence forever." 

Asked if he would like to add to that, he declared, "Not 
a syllable." 

"Independence forever" - those words to remember and 
cherish. 

If you've never been to the Adams Mansion - (Old 
House) - you've been missing a visitor's treat. 

The Mansion has been under the supervision of the U.S. 
National Park Service since 1979 and is part of the Adams 
National Historic Park. 

The late Willhelmina, as superintendent, gave the Old 
House her personal loving care. Present Supt. Mariaiuie 
Peak has carried on that tradition. 

They have kept the house in a "lived in appearance." 

Strolling the beautiful rooms, you get the feeling that 
John and Abigail are out for a little walk and will be right 
back. 




r 



HANCOCK 



The Council on Aging is 
in urgent need of wooden 
or metal wheelchairs of all 
sizes and canes to help dis- 



abled seniors to get around. 
If you have one, call the 
council at 617-376-1506. 



QUINCY ANIMAL SHELTER 

56 Broad Street. Quincy • 6 1 7-376- 1 349 
quincyanimalshelter.org 

IN-SHELTER ADOPTION HOURS 

TUESDAY and THURSDAYS 6:00 to 8:00 pm 

SATURDAYS 10 am -4 pm 

Adoption fees include initial vaccinations 

and Spay/Neuter as needed. 1 00% volunteer run, 

new volunteers always needed. 

FOR LOST or FOUND ANIMALS call 
ANIMAL CONTROL at 6 1 7-376- 1 364. 

WE HAVE LOTS OF 
KITTENS NEEDING GOOD HOMES! 
Foster Parents/ Homes Urgently Needed 

AVAHARLR DOGfi 
LOUIE: 2 year old Am. Staffordshire Terrier. 
EMMA: 7 months. Loves people. 
KTPSt Q months Lab mix. Energetic. 
.lENNIFER: Sweet Pit BuU mix. 

AVAUARLRCATS 
CESSIE: 1 y.o. tabby. Playful. 
VICTORIA: 4 y.o. gray tabby. Adults best. 
KATRINA: 5 y.o. black. Talkative. 
ABBY: young gray & white tabby. 
GINGERSNAElI y.o. pretty tabby. ^ 
IQML2 y.o. all black. No other cats, i 
MOONBEAM; 1 y.o. black. Loves attention. 



Quincv Animal Shelter Pet of the Week 



FRISKY - Surrendered due to 
her owners' failing health, this 
strikingly marked Tabby with 
stunning green eyes is looking 
for a home with adults only 
who've had cats before. This 
playful three-year-old longs to 
lounge on a windowsill of her 
very own. The barking dogs 
have made her a Uttle uneasy, 
yet she comes up to the door 
of her kennel for a head rub or 
chin tickle. 



% 




1^ 



' 'thursi^y, iuiy % 20<f^ ^*tkki t^jJiXkcy Bxua. '"t'lige 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS IS A 1950's postcard published for the Prince next to 7E's, later became the Leaning Tower of Pizza. 

Macaroni Company of Lowell showing their drive-in Demolished several years ago, the site is now part of 

restaurant on the Southern Artery. They built similar the Super Stop and Shop on the Artery. To contact Tom 

leaning tower buildings in Somerville, Wareham, South Galvin, e-mail tmgalvin@verizon.net. 



Yarmouth and Saugus.This Quincy building, which was 



From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Readers Forum 



It's Easy To Criticize, But Suggest An Alternative 



1 have a simple ques- 
tion for Mr. Haley, who 
criticized Mayor Koch for 
bargaining with the unions, 
and for agreeing to the GIC 
deal which saves the City of 
Quincy approximately $6 
million in the FY '10 bud- 
get. 

How does Mr. Haley 
think the City of Quincy 
would get into the GIC 



without bargaining with the 
unions? 

The law requires coali- 
tion bargaining. Bargain- 
ing requires give and take. 
We know what Mr. Haley 
wants; but what would he 
give to get it? 

The City saved $6 mil- 
lion and insurance-eligible 
employees got $300 apiece 
in salary. Of the savings 



from the move, the City got 
approximately 5 to 1 in ben- 
efit. Not bad for the City! 

What would Mr. Haley 
have offered instead? It's 
easy to criticize any deal, 
but Haley suggested no al- 
ternative offer to the unions. 
Would the employee groups 
have accepted his offer? 
Would the City of Quincy 's 
employees be going into 



the GIC next week, if Mr. 
Haley, or his candidate of 
choice were Mayor? 

Or would the budget re- 
quirements be $6 million 
higher? 

Reasonable people have 

reason to ask these things. 

Paul J. Phillips 

Quincy Education 

Association, Inc 

590 Hancock St. 



Church Grateful For Donations For CooKits 



Beginning on Mother's 
Day and continuing for two 
weeks thereafter, Quincy 
Community United Meth- 
odist Church collected do- 
nations for CooKits to help 
the women of Darfur. 

A CooKit is a solar pow- 
ered heating unit, which 
allows Darfur 's women to 



cook within the safety of the 
refugee camps. Without one, 
the women must go outside 
the parameters of the camp, 
where they are at high risk 
of being attacked, beaten, 
raped and branded by en- 
emy militia. 

A number of our fellow 
Quincy citizens sent dona- 



tions to Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church for 
our Darfur CooKit ministry. 
Thanks to them and the peo- 
ple of Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 
we were able to raise $350 
for the Darfur Project. 

On behalf of all of us at 
Quincy Community, thank 



you for helping to support 
the Darfur Project. 

Your generosity has liter- 
ally helped to save women's 
lives. 

Rev. Dr. Susan J. 

Jarek-Glildden. Pastor 

Quincy Community 

United Methodist Church 



Thank You Officer Steven Burgio 

I would like to personally Quincy High School dunng time to tell him as we drive tant job: protecting the kinds 

thank Officer Steven Burgio, the school year. P^st him every morning. I atNQHS. 

who through rain, sleet and He does such a great job ^^^el especially safe as my Thank you. Have a great 

snow, stands outside North and we parents don't have teenager and others cross the summer and see you in the 

street to school , oblivious to fall . 
Pajama StOrytimeS At Library everything around them. I Kathy McCluskey 

know it isn't a glamorous 
Library, 40 Washmgton St. j^^, ^^^ -^ -^ ^ ^^^ i^p^^. 




This Week 

1970 

39 Years Ago 



Black Mini-Van 



Storyteller Diane Kane 
of Creative Connecfion will 
conducted pajama story- 
times for children ages 2-5 
accompanied by an adult 
at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays 
throughout July and Au- 
gust. 

The youngsters will be 
able to use up some of that 
boundless energy singing, 
dancing and listening to sto- 
ries on July 8, 15, 22 and 29 
and Aug. 5 and 12. 

The program, sponsored 
by the Friends of the Thom- 
as Crane Public Library and 
the Quincy Arts Council, 
will take place in the large 
meeting room of the Main 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM !■■■■■ 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



1 1 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
1 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

] 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 ( 1 CHECK ENCLOSED 
1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38 .00 



Quincy 's 
Yesterdays 

Flood Insurance 
Now Available 

By FRANK McCAULEY 

Quincy homeowners now have the official go-ahead 
to purchase low-rate flood insurance under a federally 
subsidized program. 

Letters are going out from May- 
or James R. Mclntyre's office to an 
estimated 1 .000 owners of trouble 
area properties instructing them on 
how to obtain the insurance. ^^^^^^m^i^mm 

Quincy is the first city in the 
state to be approved for the program under which owners 
of single to four-family dwellings mav obtain the finan 
cial flood protection at a rate of S4 to $5 per SI.(KK)() 
coverage. 

"Until now it had been impossible to get flood protec- 
tion because the high insurance rates were prohibitive,** 
Mayor Mclntyre said. 

FINNISH PRESIDENT 
TO BE INVITED TO VISIT QUINCY 

Mayor James R. Mclntyre is inviting President Urko 
Kekkonen of Finland to visit Quincv this month. Presi- 
dent Kekkonen will make an official visit to the United 
States and is expected to fly to Fitchburg from \Vashing- 
ton. DC on July 15 to inspect the United Cooperative 
Summer Festival there. 

"If President Kekkonen 's visit to Fitchburg is firmed 
up. I will invite him to stop in Quincy." said Mclntyre. 
"It wouldn't take him that far out of his way. We have 
a Large Finnish population in Quincy of whom we are 
proud. They have helped make Quincy the great city that 
it is." Mclntyre declared. 

QUINCYISMS 

Kenneth P. Fallon, Jr., vice-president in charge of sales 
for Radio Station WJDA. Quinc>. was scheduled to be in- 
stalled as Supreme Counselor (International President) ot 
the Order of United Commercial Iravelers of America at the 
group's 83'*' Annual Conventn)n in .New Orleans Harold 
S. Crowley, Jr.. 3 Flagg St.. Wbllaston. was appointed to the 
Conservation Commission by .Mayor James R .Mclntvre 
Miss Jean Fossati and Mrs. Margaret King, teachers in 
the Quinc> Public School system, were attending the lOS'' 
Annual Convention of the .National hducation Association 
in San Francisco. . . 7 he "Grand Opening" of "Beautv Time," 
located at 1466 Hancock St . Quincy Center, was scheduled 
for July 6. Introductory prices included a "Haircut for onlv 
$2"... The Quincy High School Class of 1965 uas planning 
a fifth-year reunion to be held at the South Shore Countrv 
Club in Hingham. Members of the class may contact Daniel 
Raymondi. class president, for further information. Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Nichol celebrated their 30"' wedding an- 
niversary at a surprise party given by their children. The 
event was held at the Houghs Neck American Legion Post 
Home. The couple was married by Mrs. NichoFs brother. 
Rev. John Duffy, CSSR. Mr. Nichol had been a member of 
the Quincy Police Department for over 20 years while Mrs. 
Nichol was employed by Montilio's Bakery. The couple has 
four children and six grandchildren... Arthur R. Curtis 
was elected by the Congregation to the position of Associ- 
ate Minister at Bethany Congregational Church Rev. Curtis 
was a graduate of Boston University School of Theology. . . 
Quincy Minit Car Wash, 459 Southern Arter>. was advertis- 
ing "Custom Car Washes for $2.25*'... Wollaston Federal 
Savings and Loan Association. 15 Beach St.. Wbllaston. 
was offering a 5 Vi^c per annum interest rate: "On Our .New 
90-Day Special Notice Account" .. Robert F. Denvir, Jr.. 
11 Spnng St., was elected president of the Houghs Neck 
Community Council for the year 1970-1971. He succeeds 
John Powers. Fhe Council . at the request of Leo J. Kelly, a 
member of the Sgt. Grenham Youth Center Board of Direc- 
tors, voted to become the official sponsor of the center. . . At 
Brett's Package Store, West Squantum St.. Montclair. a full 
part of "Colonel Quincy. Blended Whiskey " was selling for 
$4.69.. Rep. Clifford H. Marshall has endorsed legisla- 
fion, which if passed, will create an executive office of elder 
affairs, headed by a cabinet level secretary . MDC Detec- 
tive Leo A. Papile received high departmental honors from 
MDC Commissioner John W. Sears for his role in helping 
to solve the sh(x>ting of MDC Officer Edward G. Sullivan 
on January 12. 1970. 



\ f'l 



Page 6 Tlte Qwincy Sim Thursday, July 2, 2009 



Arts & Ertertalrmert 




THE BOSTON LANDMARKS Orchestra will perform a con- 
cert Thursday, July 23 at Beale House, 135 Adams St., Quincy, 
featuring Jacqueline Choi, a 22-year-old Korean-American 
cellist. 



Featuring Acclaimed 22 Year-Old Cellist 

Boston Landmarks Concert 
At Beale House July 23 

Jacqueline Choi, a 22 
year-old cellist, recent Mas- 
ter's Degree graduate of 
the New England Conser- 
vatory and recipient of the 
Conservatory's President's 
Award, will join the Boston 
Landmarks Orchestra on 
Wednesday, July 22 at the 
DCR Hatch Shell on Bos- 
ton's Esplanade for the first 
performance of her engage- 
ment as part of the Land- 
marks Festival at the Shell. 

Before moving to New 
York to study as part of the 
Master's program at Juil- 
liard, Jacqueline Choi will 
grace the Orchestra and its 
fans with a performance of 
Haydn's Cello Concerto No. 
1 in C Major at three up- 
coming Landmarks perfor- 
mances: 

• Wednesday, July 22nd 
at the Hatch Shell at 7 p.m.; 

• Thursday, July 23 at the 
Beale Estate in Quincy at 7 
p.m. (135 Adams St.,) 

• Sunday, July 26th on 
the Great Lawn at Jamaica 
Pond at 6 p.m. 

"I'm super excited about 
playing with the Landmarks 
Orchestra and finally getting 
to work with Mr. Ansbach- 
er!" said Jacqueline Choi. 
"What a blessing it is for me 
to wrap up my final summer 
in Boston, playing for some 
of the best audiences in the 
most beautiful outdoor en- 
vironments in this city. It's 
truly a gift." 



Jacqueline Choi has per- 
formed as a soloist with the 
Boston Symphony, the New 
England Philharmonic and 
Korea's Bucheon Philhar- 
monic. 

In 2008, Choi debuted in 
Seoul, South Korea, where 
she lived for eight years, at 
the Kumo Art Hall and was 
invited to play at the Musee 
de Louvre in Paris. 

In the past, Choi has per- 
formed with renowned art- 
ists Itzhak Perlman, Donald 
Weilerstein, William Sharp 
and Nicholas Mann. Recent- 
ly, Choi has programmed 
her own transcriptions of 
the Schubert, Schumann and 
Strauss lieder. 

Choi's first concert with 
the Orchestra, entitled Vien- 
nese Masters, explores the 
rich history of Classical and 
Romantic pieces inspired by 



Vienna, Austria and will also 
feature Johannes Brahms' 
Symphony No. 1 in C mi- 
nor. Op. 68. 

The concert is the second 
performance of the Third 
Annual Landmarks Festi- 
val at the Shell, a free con- 
cert series occurring every 
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the 
Landmarks' summer home, 
the DCR Hatch Shell. 

Charles Ansbacher, Con- 
ductor and Artistic Director, 
founded the Boston Land- 
marks Orchestra in January 
2001 to perform free con- 
certs in significant histori- 
cal, geographical, and archi- 
tectural settings throughout 
the Greater Boston area. 

For more information 
about the Boston Land- 
marks Orchestra, visit www. 
LandmarksOrchestra.org or 
call 617-520-2200. 




Monday Night 
Blues Jam 

w/Ricky King Russell 
& The Double D's 



Tuesday 



Cheese Pizzas 

2-8PM 

I w/ Adult Bcvcrd'^c) 



Wednesday 
Acoustic Night 

w/Russ & Pablo 

Thursday 

Karaoke & Dance 

Music w/Paul Q 

Friday & Saturday 
Live Bands 



BomrMAM Daily 

Putt Menu UaM'Upm 



}? W ushiniiUtn St .. (Jiiim \ 

eff-4f f-il€)€ 



5 



TtK:^-*'SJ*^niH 





-13) 



Homemade Ice Cream ft Yogurt 

Ice Cream Cakes, Pies and Pizzas 

SPECIAL FLAVORS r 

•Birthday Cake 
•Blueberry 

•Mango 

2295 Dorchester Ayenue 

Dorchester Lower Mills MA 02 1 24 

617-296-8567 Open Daily Noon - 10 pm 

www.theicecreamsmith.com 






BY MARIE D'OLIMPIO 




Artichoke Appetizer, Cheesy Potatoes 



It was a rehearsal dinner for my grand- 
daughter Lauren and her soon to be husband 
Christian at the home of Nancy and Ralph 
Jacobs, Christian's parents. 

And of course there were so many deli- 
cious foods ranging from appetizers to grilled 
steaks. Actually, when I walked into the party, 
Ralph asked if I was looking for some new 
recipes, which I immediately answered, " 
of course." 

Today I have two of Nancy 's recipes - one 
is an appetizer, and the other is a scrumptious 
potato side dish. 

NORTH SHORE POTATOES 
5 pounds potatoes ( unpeeled cooked) 
refrigerate overnight 
1 small onion copped 
1 1/2 sticks butter 

1 1/2 pkg. shredded white cheddar 
cheese 
1 container sour cream 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees 

Grate the potatoes on a cheese grater (shred 
side) or other type and place in a large bowl. 
Set aside. 



In a double boiler, put the onions, butter 
and cheese, and cook until melted. 

Add the sour cream to the cheese mix, 
then remove from heat. 

Blend all of this together and then pour 
over the potatoes. Mix well. Place in a 1 3 x 
9 inch baking pan and cook uncovered for 
30 minutes. It is truly the most flavorful of 
any potato that I have ever had. 

The other recipe is for an artichoke dip and 
since that's one of the my favorite vegetables, 
I couldn't wait to make it. 

ARTICHOKE DIP 
1 can artichokes, packed in water 
1 cup mayonnaise 
1 cup Parmesan cheese 
1/4 of a small onion (chopped fine) 
sprinkle of paprika 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees 

Drain the artichokes and chop. Mix them 
with the mayonnaise, Parmesan and onion in 
a bowl . 

Place in a shallow baking dish, sprinkle 
with paprika, and bake for 20 minutes. Serve 
with any kind of cracker or chips. 



Artists, Photographers Invited 
To Explore Adams Park July 18-19 



Artists and photog- 
raphers, young and old, 
professional and amateur 
alike, are invited to display 
their talents on a midsum- 
mer weekend in the bucolic 
and historic confines of the 
Adams National Historical 
Park. 

From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 
Saturday and Sunday, July 
18 and 19, visitors will be 
able to explore the grounds 
of Peace field, the old 
Adams mansion, with cam- 
era, brush and crayon to cre- 



ate their unique perspectives 
of a national treasure. 

Paintings, drawings, 
sketches and photographs 
produced over the week- 
end may be exhibited in the 
1873 Carriage House on the 
estate Saturday, July 25. 

The same day, Saturday, 
July 25, the ANHP curator 
will conduct a behind-the- 
scenes tour of the paintings, 
portraits, prints and pho- 
tographs that illustrate the 
history of the Adams family 
and their historic homes. 



The Adams NHP collec- 
tion provides insight into the 
people who produced, posed 
for, purchased and preserved 
some of the nation's preemi- 
nent collections of fine and 
decorative arts. 

The insider's look at the 
Park's collection is free and 
open to the public but space 
on the curator's tour is lim- 
ited and reservations are 
required. Call the Visitors' 
Center at 617-770-1175 to 
make a reservation. 



USS Salem To Host Family Sleepovers 



The USS Salem, a 716- 
foot long U.S. navy Heavy 
Cruiser Gunship, will host 
two family overnight adven- 
ture programs this summer. 

The program is open to 
families who are looking for 
a fun, activity-filled mini- 
vacation. 

The scheduled overnight 
dates are July 18 to 19 and 
Aug. 22 to 23. This is the 



The QHS Football Alumni Association 

will be hosting its 2nd Annual Fundralsing Event 

WHEN: Wed., July 15, 2009, 6:00 p.m. WHERE: The Water Club@Marina Bay 
DONATION: $20 at the door— Dinner Buffet included 

(must be 21 or older to attend) 

Please join us to support this gear's team. 
There will be food courtesy; of Siro's, drink, music and raffle prizes: 

Ray Bourque Autographed Hockey Stidc ~ Kevin Faulk 16x20 

Autographed Photo ~ Tim Thomas 8x10 Autographed Photo ~ Jason Varitek 

Autographed Baseball ~ 2 Pairs of Red Sox Tickets & More... 

If^you cannot attend, but would still like to support the team, please mail donations to: 

Coach Bill Reardon, Quincy High School, Guidance Department, 

52 Coddington Street, Quincy MA 02169 

Make checks pai;able to: Quincy High School 



second year the museum 
ship has opened up its over- 
night program to families. 

"We have operated our 
award-winning overnight 
adventure program for more 
than 12 years now," said 
Michael Condon, execu- 
tive director of the museum 
ship. "Our target audience 
has been youth groups and 
school groups but last year 
we decided to give families 
an opportunity to participate 
and it was a big hit," Con- 
don said. 

The program runs Satur- 
day until Sunday and takes 



place aboard the USS Sa- 
lem. The overnight adven- 
ture includes fun, hands-on 
and educational activities, 
all meals and a Boston Har- 
bor cruise aboard the Har- 
bor Express. Participants 
eat their meals on board the 
ship and sleep in the crew's 
quarters. 

The family overnight 
adventure program will be 
held July 18 to July 19 and 
Aug. 22 to Aug. 23. Cost is 
$45 per person and includes 
all activities and meals. For 
reservations or more infor- 
mation, call 617-479-7900. 




: Private art clotses in the fine arts for children oges 9 to 12. 

Closs octivities include drawing, painting, 
: coUoge, and sculpture. 

• 

; Call or e-mail for a brochure & more information 

; 617-460-0749 / paul.andrade®ymaiI.com 



1 hursday, July 2, 2009 The QiEJncySma Page 7 



Social 



Jefferson And Adams Play At 
Beale House Lawn Saturday 



available at the Visitor Cen- 
ter, 1250 Hancock St. A free 
shuttle service is provided to 
the Beale House. 

The program is free. 

The Adams National 
Historical Park Service was 
established in 1946 to com- 
memorate the lives of four 
generations of the Adams 
family including second 
US President John Adams 
and sixth US President John 
Quincy Adams. 

For more information, 
call the Visitor Center at 
617-770-1175. 



The Adams National 
Historical Park Service will 
present Jefferson & Adams: 
A Stage Play Saturday at 7 
p.m. under the festival tent 
on the Beale House Lawn, 
181 Adams St. 

Bill Barker and Abigail 
Schumann and veteran actor 
Sam Goodyear will return to 
Peace Field to bring the life 
the 50 years friendship be- 
tween two American Presi- 
dents, Thomas Jefferson and 
John Adams. 

Limited street parking is 
available on Adams Street, 
but validated parking is 

Declaration Of Independence 
Re-enactment Saturday 

The re-enactment of the to the Second Continental 

passage of the Declaration Congress and engage in a 

of Independence at the Sec- debate that will culminate 

ond Continental Congress in the adoption of the Decla- 

will be held Saturday at 12 ration of Independence and 

noon and at 3 p.m. in the the singing of the historic 

Carriage House (Pennsyl- document, 
vania State House) on the The program is free, 

grounds of the Old House at For more information. 

Peace Field, 135 Adams St. call the Visitor Center at 

Participants may assume 617-770-1175. 
the role? of the delegated 

John Quincy Adams Birthday 
Celebration July 11 At Peace Field 

The celebration of the House in Peace Field, 135 

232nd birthday of John Adams St. 
Quincy Adams, and por- Cooke will serve a slice 

trayed by Jim Cooke) will of birthday cake to all w o 

be held at 12 noon, Satur- attend the free festivities, 
day, July 1 1 at the Carriage 

Five Residents On Dean's List 
At Saint Anselm College 




Three Quincy Students 
Graduate Boston Choir School 



BRIAN and MICHELE GLENNON 

(Olan Mills Photo) 

Brian And Michele Glennon 
Celebrate 40th Anniversary 



Three Quincy boys re- 
cently graduated from the 
Boston Archdiocese Choir 
School in Cambridge. 

They are: 

Peter Jensen, son of Mr 
and Mrs. George Jensen; 
Brendan Murray, son of Mr 
and Mrs. Michael Murray; 
and Timothy Keenan. son of 
Mr. and Mrs John Keenan 

Jensen earned first hon- 
ors with distinction. 

Keenan earned second 
honors for the final term 

Both Jensen and .Mur- 
ray earned recognition for 
the National French hxam, 
receiving the Certicats d" 
Honneur and Laurel Nation- 
al, respectively. 

All three boys will attend 
Boston College High School 
in the fall. 

Steven Huynh. son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Simon Huynh. 



a seventh grader, earned first 
honors with distinction 

Other Quint> b()>s who 
attend the school are 

Caiman O larrell, Sean 
Patrick Hannon, Justin Au. 
Ror> Lavin. Devon Yu. Pe- 
ter Saccoach and Brendan 
McDonald 

The Choir School, home 
of the Boston Bo> Choir, is a 
full-time da\ school for vo- 
callv talented boys in grades 
hve through eight 

The school provides the 
choristers with a rich edu- 
cation in music along with 
rigorous academics Some 
highlights from this past 
>ear were singing the .Na- 
tional Anthem at Fenwa> 
Park and enjoying a school 
trip to Quebec City where 
the\ sang at Notre Dame 
Basilica. 



Brian and Michele Glen- 
non of North Quincy re- 
cently celebrated their 40th 
wedding anniversary among 
family and friends at a gath- 
ering June 20 at the Robert 
I. Nickerson Post on Moon 
Island Road, Squantum. 

Mayor Thomas Koch 
presented the couple with 
a citation, declaring June 
20 as "Brian and Michele 



Quincy. 

State Rep. Bruce Ayers 
and Ward 6 Councillor Brian 
F. McNamee also presented 
the couple with commenda- 
tions. 

The Glennons also re- 
ceived a Papal Blessing 
from Pope Benedict XVI. 

The couple married June 
20, 1969 at Sacred Heart 
Church in North Quincy. 



Kevin Barry Graduates Notre Dame 



Kevin M. Barr> of Quin- 
cy recently graduated cum 
laude with a degree in busi- 
ness administration from the 



University of Notre Dam. 
Notre Dame. Indiana. 

He is the son of Kevin 
and Denise Barrv. 



^.x< 



■ ''''y<-'y ■■.-■yyyy 



Glennon Day" in the City of 

Five Residents Graduate Stonehill 




Five Quincy students 
have been named to the 
Dean's List for the second 
semester at Saint Anselm 
College, Manchester, N.H. 

They are: 

Aleta M. Baldassini, 



Natalie A. Djerf, Nhu Q. 
Nguyen, Michael Doherty 
and Jennifer Lorenz. 

To be eligible for this 
honor, a student must com- 
pile a grade point average of 
3 .0 or better. 



The following local stu- 
dents have graduated from 
Stonehill College. 

Amy Tsui 
On Dean's List 

Amy Tsui of Quincy, has 
been named to the Dean's 
List at Grinnell College, 
Grinnell , Iowa for the spring 
semester. 

She is the daughter of 
Mr. Joy F. Tsui . 



They are: Jean -Jacques 
Niamkey. Cindy Chu, Cait- 
lin Foy Rooney, Sean Tobin, 
and Katie L. Walker. 



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Function Halls Available for all your Special Needs.. 

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If you would like to see your ad here, 
please call 617-471-3100 



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Band Director 

Mike Cahill Enters 

Hall Of Fame 



The former Quincy coach 
who once took his team to 
play in the Cotton Bowl has 
been named to the Hall of 
Fame. 

Mike Cahill, the band di- 
rector at Quincy High School 
from 1 972 to 1 98 1 . was cho- 
sen to join the Class of 2009 
of the Massachusetts Drum 
& Bugle Corps and Music 
Educator Hall of Fame. 

Under Cahill's direc- 
tion, the QHS Marching 
Presidents Band was recog- 
nized as one of the pioneers 
in the drum corps-style 
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England. 

During Cahill's regime, 
the Presidents marched at 
the Cotton Bowl Festival in 
Dallas, Tex.; the Blossom 
Festivals in Washington, 
DC, and Winchester, Va., 
and the Bermuda Music 
Festival. 

The Band also were win- 
ners of the International 
Blossom Festival in Niagara 
Falls, Ontario, finishing first 
in a field of 82 bands from 
all over North America. 

Cahill's formal induction 
took place at the Annual 
Hall of Fame Dinner/Dance 
at the IBEW Heritage Hall 
in Dorchester with two of 
his championship ensembles 
performing for the event. 

Both groups have major 
influences of Cahill's experi- 
ence — Mass Brass, the cur- 
rent Mini-Corps Association 
champs in which he is per- 
cussionist, and The Legends 
of Drum Corps, under his 
direction. 

The dinner/dance also 
served as a reunion for 
former members of the 
Marching Presidents dur- 
ing Cahill's time at Quincy 
High. 




1976 QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL Marching Presidents Band, 
director Michael Cahill's fifth at the school, lines up for its an- 
nual yearbook picture. Cahill, who pioneered the drum corps- 



style marching band in New England, was recently named to 
the State Drum & Bugle Corps and Music Educator Hall for 
Fame. 



Summerfest Outdoor Concert Series Begins July 8 




1009! 

Summer Fun 

'''^ Ages3to6»Tues.,Wed.,Thurs.am 

• Creative Movement • Gymnastics 
• Arts & Crafts • Story Time • Fun & Games 

6 Week Summer Session 

•Gymnastic Ages 2 to 12 
' Dance Ages 3 to 7 • Hip Hop Ages 5 to 10 

Programs start the week of July 13th 
Reserve your space now! Class size is limited. 

64 ROSS WAY, QUINCY / 617-471-3808 

WWW.YOUNGWORLDSCHOOL.COM 



A 



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The City of Quincy an- 
nounced Tuesday that the 
first of five scheduled free 
outdoor concerts for the 
2009 Summerfest Concerts 
Series will take place on 
Wednesday, July 8, with the 
Ed Broms Jazz Quartet, fea- 
turing Timo Shanko on ten- 
or saxophone playing at the 
Ruth Gordon Amphitheatre 
in Merry mount Park. 

The concert will begin 
at 7 p.m. and admission is 
free. Adults and families 
are welcome. For more in- 



formation, call the Quincy 
Parks Department at 617- 
376-1251. 

The July 8 concert is 
sponsored by Old Colony 
Music Together, which of- 
fers early childhood music 
and movement classes for 
children ages' birth to seven 
years old in East Milton, 
Quincy and other Boston- 
area locations. 

The complete 2009 Sum- 
merfest Concert schedule is 
as follows: 

July 8: Ed Broms Jazz 



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Quartet. 

July 15: Denis O'Gorman, 
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July 22: The Spring Hill 
Rounders, some of the hot- 
test Bluegrass this side of 
the Housatonic. 

July 29: Vento Chiaro, a 
quintet comprised of flute, 
oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and 
French horn. 

Aug. 5: Quincy Summer 
Singers, led by he dynamic 
conductor Delvyn Case, the 
Quincy Summer Singers is a 
50-person community choir 
that performs classical mu- 



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Under the artistic direc- 
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Summerfest Concert Series 
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Quincy and a consortium of 
local businesses and individ- 
uals including, Quincy Point 
Music Academy, Eastern 
Nazarene College's LEAD 
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dio. Campus KinderHaus, 
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I hursday, July 2, 2009 Tl^e QiOncy Sun Page 9 



City's State Aid Slashed By 19% , FY 40 Budget Approved 



Cont 'd From Pa/fe I 

Koch's estimated a 15% 
or $7 million cut in local aid 
when he submitted his 2010 
budget of $226^523,476 in 
May. 

At the time, city officials 
considered the 15% local 
aid cut conservative and 
anticipated a smaller cut. 
However, revenue estimates 
at the state level plunged 
from May to June and the 
anticipated local aid cuts 
ranged from 15% to 37%. 

Despite the financial tur- 
moil at the state level. Coun- 
cillors had a legal mandate to 
approve a final budget figure 
last week within 45 days of 
Koch's presentation. 

To meet that deadline, the 
City Council unanimously 
approved Koch's FY 2010 
budget on June 25 with the 
understanding that neither 
the state nor the city's rev- 
enue figures were firm and 
the budget will be revisited, 
and likely, revised in the 
fall. 

"We're not done with 
the 2010 budget," Finance 
Committee Chairman John 
Keenan said before the vote. 
Councillors agreed with 
Keenan that they would be 
"taking a look at this on a 
regular basis starting in Sep- 
tember." 

"it leaves a very tight 
situation," said Keenan of 
the budget which provides 



level-funding for most de- 
partments and maintains the 
2009 municipal tax levy of 
$169 million. 

"We did a lot of work," 
said Keenan adding, "This 
is just an odd and unprec- 
edented year." The Finance 
Committee began schedul- 
ing budget discussions in 
January 

The council may have 
to make new cuts in the 
budget if the city's revenue 
or state aid decline further, 
according to Keenan who 
described the turmoil on 
Beacon Hill where revenue 
estimates varied with each 
budget. 

"They get worse by the 
day," said Keenan of the 
state's finances. Keenan 
said the Finance Committee 
will request monthly reports 
from the city's Department 
of Municipal Revenue and 
schedule a final review be- 
fore December. 

"If there is a need at that 
time, we will go back (and 
make adjustments) as we ap- 
proach the tax rate," Keenan 
said. 

When Koch presented 
his FY2010 budget, he 
described the budget as 
level-funded, but warned 
residents and city officials, 
"Level funding is different 
from level services." 

In fact, the approved 
budget includes layoffs in 



the school and fire depart- 
ment and unfilled positions 
in the police department. 
The police and fire depart- 
ments are level -funded. 

The school department 
budget is level-funded at 
$81 million in the city's 
2010 budget . However, the 
school department received 
federal stimulus funds rais- 
ing their available funds by 
$4 million. 

The School Committee 
approved an $89 million 
budget for 2010. 

Despite the bare-bones 
budget, Koch pledged to 
maintain the current $169 
million tax levy raised 
through real estate and per- 
sonal property taxes. If as- 
sessments go down, the tax 
rate will increase. 

On the plus side, Keenan 
said city officials expect 
$2.1 million in new growth, 
a conservative increase in 
excise tax, but lower hotel- 
motel revenues. 

"We have to watch rev- 
enues," said Keenan 

Ward 2 Councillor Dan- 
iel Raymondi focused on 
revenue projections during 
the budget discussion, warn- 
ing that the city's revenue 
projections are much too 
high and "indicate a serious 
shortfall." 

"It's a moving target." 
said Keenan. suggesting the 
revenue figures will become 



Nutritious lunches are served free 
to all kids age 18 and under: 

MONDAY - FRIDAY II 

June 29 - August 21, 2009 m. 

from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at: 



f 



Parker Elementary School Cafeteria 
148 Billings Road, North Quincy 

Lincoln Hancock School Cafeteria 
300 Granite St., Quincy 

Ward II Comnr^unity Center 

(Fore River Clubhouse) 
16 Nevada Road, Quincy Point 

Snug Harbor School (outdoor shelter) 
333 Painter Street, &ern\antown 

Quincy Housing Authority (at Circle) 
9 Bicknell Circle, Sern^antown 



Sponsored by Quincy Public Schools 

The Summer Food Service Program prohibits discrimination because of race, sex, color, notional origin, age or handicap. 
Sponsored by the Massochusetts Deportment of Elementary ond 5econdaf7 Education 



clearer with the closing of 
the 2(K)9 hscal year. 

"We've been conserva- 
tive," said Jim Fatseas, the 
mayor's chief of staff, stat- 
ing, "We stand by the bud- 
get. We are as confident as 
we can be." 

The city's finances will 
not improve over the next 
few years, according to 
Keenan who warned that 
the financial picture will be 
even more dismal nex-t year 
when health insurance costs 
and pension appropriations 
increase, and wage deferrals 
come due as will payments 



on the new high school 
bonds 

"(jovernment, generally, 
lags the economy," Keenan 
said, adding. "Hven it the 
economy improves, we're 
in this hole, perhaps getting 
wt)rse for the next couple of 
years." 

Following the budget 
discussion. councillors 

unanimously approved 

nearly $936,603 in budget 
transfers to cover shortfalls 
in 18 areas. 

The largest transfer of 
$3(K).(XX) covered increased 
Medicare assessments. 



which increased due to 
new employees and salary 
changes, according to War- 
ren Sproul. Director of the 
MRD 

'lransfersofS13().(KK)for 
I nemployment Compensa- 
tion and S I 89.(KK) for Public 
Building, contractual, also 
topped the list ot transfers. 

Funds were transferred 
from some two dozen ac- 
counts including. Street 
lighting. contractual. 

{S189.(XK)) and fuel savings 
($12H.(XK))and trash collec- 
tion ( S7 1 .(XX)) budget were 
the top three transfers 



Council Rejects Noise Limits 



Conl d From Fa^e I 



Favoring the amended 
version were McNamee. 
Keenan. Kelly. City Coun- 
cil President Jay Davis and 
Ward 3 Councillor Kevin 
Coughlin. 

However. City Solicitor 
James Timmins ruled the 
vote invalid that night, ad- 
vising that the revision had 
to be advertised and a spe- 
cial meeting was scheduled 
for this week. 

On Monday. Kelly joined 
Councillors McFarland. Jo- 
seph Finn. Douglas Gutro. 
Ward 5 and Daniel Ray- 
mondi, Ward 2. in opposing 
the ordinance. 

POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



'There was no compro- 
mise." McFarland said after 
the meeting. "If wed come 
up with a compromise. 
there'd be an ordinance." 

After the ordinances 
defeat and adjournment. 
McNamee warned that the 
councils action would have 
far-reaching effects on the 
city's tax base and leave 
residents with no protection 
from noisy outdoor ven- 
tures 

McNamee cited the hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars 
invested in Manna Bay resi- 
dences and warned that those 
residents will either move or 
seek abatements due to the 



impact of outdoor noise on 
their homes and residents 
in other areas will have to 
make up the difference 

Some 12 to 15 residents 
of Manna Bay attended 
.Monday's meeting lo sup- 
pon the anti-noise ordinance 
which has been highh con- 
troversial as illustrated b\ 
one Manna Bav resident's 
experience 

The resident declined to 
give her name lo The Quin- 
c\ Sun because she said 
shed been harassed after 
being quoted in favor of the 
ordinance in another news- 
paper 



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Page 10 Tlie Qtilnoy Siui Thursday, July 2, 2009 



Sacred Heart School Class Of 2009 Baccalaureate Mass 




Sacred Heart School Class of 2009 were recently awarded di- 
plomas at a Baccalaureate Mass and Ceremony at Sacred Heart 
Church in North Quincy. The graduates are: Jaime Anton, 
Caitlin Bulger, Ashley Catizone, Peter Cedrone, Suki Chan, 
Julianne Downey, Jennifer Dunphy, Jamie Figueiredo, Erin 
Healy, (ileena Henthorn, Julia Himmel, Jacquelyn Jakas, Kel- 
sey Laforest, Tiffany Leung, Kristyn Mark, Molly McGlynn, 
Christine Pedro, Dylan Porter, Fiona Riordan, Kara Rowland, 
Stephanie Stinfort, Kathleen Tansey, Connie Tsan, Zachary 
Walsh, Kyle Waters and Abigail Yotts. Principal Katherine 
Hunter told the graduates, ''Each of you is a unique indivi- 
dual with special C>od given talents and abilities. Take pride in 
your accomplishments, whether big and small. Remember who 
you are and remain strong in your faith. As you leave Sacred 
Heart School, know that all of us wish you happiness, success 



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and the fulfillment of your dreams!" Several awards were pre- 
sented during the evening, including the President's Award for 
Educational Excellence, the President's Award for Educational 
Achievement, National Junior Honor Society, Johns Hopkins 
Center for Talented Youth, and Perfect Attendance Awards. 
Scholarships awarded to students who will be attending lo- 
cal Catholic High Schools include the Atlantis Award, Joseph 
Barry Award, Edward Battles Award, Catholic Women's Club, 
Pauline Donovan Award, Donovan Family Award, Charles F. 
Gallagher Award, James M. Gibbons Award, Sister Honorius 
Award, Suzanne Sheehy Award, William Moore Award, and 
the Capt. John and Joseph Salenius Award. Scholarships are 
made possible through the kindness and generosity of Sacred 
Heart School benefactors. 

Photo Courtesy Sacred Heart School 



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Anthony Agnitti 

Recognized By Insurance 

Education Organization 



The National Alliance 
for Insurance Education and 
Research recently honored 
Anthony L. Agnitti, CIC, 
president of Agnitti Insur- 



tinuing education update 
is required, signifying ad- 
vanced knowledge in the 
field of insurance. 

"This accomplishment 



ance Agency in Quincy, for represents a personal, long- 
educational commitment standing commitment not 



and leadership within the 
insurance and risk manage- 
ment industry. 

Agnitti was awarded a 
certificate of achievement. 



only to advanced education, 
but to Agnitti Insurance and 
the insurance profession as 
a whole," said Dr. William 
D. Hold, CIC, CPCU,CLU, 



recognizing 15 consecutive president of the National 
years of active affiliation Alliance. 



with the Society of Certi- 
fied Insurance Counselors 
(CIC). To maintain the CIC 
designation, an annual con- 



"The high standards 
maintained by Tony Agnitti 
set him apart as a true pro- 
fessional," Dr. Hold added. 



Caitlin Fitzgerald Graduates 
Worcester State College 

Caitlin Fitzgerald has land School of Law next 

September to pursue a law 
degree. 

She is the daughter of 
Barbara and Jack Fitzgerald 
of Squantum. 



graduated Magna Cum 
Laude from Worcester State 
College in only three years. 
She will attend New Eng- 



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Thursday, July 2, 2009 The Qulncy Suia Page 1 1 




FRIENDS OF WOLLASTON Btach presented its Friend of tlie Vear Award to the staff of the 
Department of Conservation and Recreation. From left are: Sandi Meskimen, Rob McArthur, 
Karl Pastore, Paul Hickey and Joseph Orfant. 



NEIL McCOLE (second from right) presents the Friends of Wollaston Beach Honorar> Friend 
Award to Rep. Bruce Ayers (far right). Looking on are Ward 5 Councillor Doug (iutro (far left) 
and Mayor Tom Koch. 



Friends Of Wollaston Beach Hold Awards Night 



The Friends of Wollas- 
ton Beach recently held its 
annual meeting and awards 
night. 

The fun-filled event was 
received by a full house 
in the Beech wood Knoll 
School gymnasium. The 
evening included: a year in 
review for 2008, plans for 
events in 2009, a presenta- 
tion of pictures highlighting 
the beach events for the past 
two years, a beach history 
presentation, and the annual 
awards. 

The 2008 highlights in- 
cluded 14 beach related 
events in 2008 and the re- 
ceipt of nearly $90,000 in 
grants and donations for 




SANDI MESKIMEN of the state Department of Conserva- 
tion and Recreation is recognized with a Friends of Wollaston 
Beach Spirit Award. She also received a citation for her com- 
mitment to Wollaston Beach from Mayor Tom Koch. 

beach improvements and The 2009 plans focused 

events. on the events for the upcom- 



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POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



Please Join Us For A 



TRADITIONAL 



4>^/^//^^A^ BAKbtLU t 

With 



SENATOR MICHAEL W. MORRISSEY 



At 

Marina Bay Beach Club 

"Formally Water Works' 

Marina Bay, Quincy 



^ 



Thursday, July 1 6th, 2009, 6-9 P.M. 

Traditional Summertime Cookout 
/ featuring Music by 'VENTED CANS'' 
Dor\atior) $20.00 per person 

For tickets and information, call 617-376-0900 

Checks may be sent to the CTE, 

Michael W. Morrissey, P.O. Box 215, 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

Paid for and authorized by The Committee to Re-elect Michael W. Morrissey 



ing beach season and the 
installation of the interpre- 
tive signs along Wollaston 
Beach that will highlight the 
history, natural beauty, and 
amenities of the area. 

City historian Tom Gal- 
vin delighted the crowd with 
his overview and pictures 
detailing the history of the 
beach. 

FWB President, Neil 
McCole, said "We are ex- 
cited that the plans for using 
the matching grant funds re- 
ceived in 2008 from the MA 
DCR and the Community 
Preservation Committee for 
the interpretive signs project 
is on schedule. It will be an 
added feature to this valu- 



able community asset. 

"Our thanks to Tom Gal- 
vm for his e.xpertise and m- 
sight into the project " 

Other major financial 
contributors in 2(X)8 were; 
Save the Harbor Save the 
Bay and The University of 
Phoenix - MA Campus. 

The night ended with the 
presentation of awards. 

The Friend of the Year 
Award was presented to the 
DCR Staff assigned to Wol- 
laston Beach for their dedi- 
cation to the rehabilitation 
and revival of the beach. 

Representative Bruce 
Ayers joined Tom Galvin. 
former Mayor Frank Mc- 
Cauley. and Ward I Coun- 



cillor Leo Kelly in receiving 
an FWB Honorary Friend 
Award for his commitment 
to improvements and safet> 
at the beach. 

The Spirit Award was 
presented to Sandi Meski- 
men of the MA EX"R tor 
her continuous efforts to- 
wards the beautification and 
maintenance of Wollaston 
Beach 

Ihe Member of the Year 
Award was presented to 
Richard Joyce in recognition 
of his ongoing volunteerism 
and support for FWB 

McCole ended the night 
by congratulating the award 
winners and b\ thanking all 
of those in attendance 



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SAM ADAMS 

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60 years of Neighbors Serving Neighbors 



Page 12 TH« Qu incy Sim Thursday, July 2, 2009 

Senior Center Dedication Today 



Cont 'd From Page I 

has until now been forced 
to host its broad range of 
programs at different sites 
around the city, according 
to Elder Services Director 
Thomas Clasby. 

In addition to hosting the 
department's programs, the 
Kennedy Center will boast a 
computer lab, game rooms, 
arts and crafts, library pro- 
grams, a music room and 
expanded meal programs. 



About $1 million in 
renovations to the building 
came from an existing capi- 
tal improvement-financing 
package approved before 
Mayor Koch took office. 
The money was freed up af- 
ter the city scrapped plans to 
build a garage at the Depart- 
ment of Public Works that 
was found to be inadequate, 
Koch said. 

A major sewer repair 
project at the site also did 



not come from the city's 
operating budget, as it was 
paid for by the Sewer Re- 
habilitation Fund, which is 
a fund created by develop- 
ment fees, Koch said. 

"This is a great example 
of finding cost-effective 
ways to do positive things," 
Koch said. "The building 
was in serious disrepair, but 
we were to completely re- 
hab it without seeking any 
additional money." 



'Parachuting Space Capsules' At Library 




The rotatinc Art-to-fio day at the Adams Shore Li- from 2 to 4 p. m. to make a ELDERSERVICESDIRECTORTomClasby inside the computer Mid media rooin one of the 
nroectfonheweekofMon- brary, 519 Sea St.; Wednes- craft. Projects are designed features of the new Kennedy Senior Center. The center »iil be the Brst centrahzed location to 
^ ^6 at the ^omas day a, the North Quincy to accomtnodate a wide age housjggrjn»^mlby theDepartmemofElderS^ 
Crane Public Library will Library, 381 Hancock St.; ar range, easy enough for pre- 
be "Parachuting Space Cap- Thursday at the Wollaston schoolers with adult help to 
sules." Library, 41 Beale St. free enough for school age 

Supplies will be available Youngsters from toddlers kids. 

Art-to-go is sponsored by 
the Friends of the Thomas 
Crane Public Library. 



Monday at the Main Library to school age children ar in- 
at 40 Washington St.; Tues- vited to drop in at any time 



BAXTER PHARMACY 

& Medical Supplies 

Your Full Service Neiiihhorhood Pharmacy 
464 Was/iiiii^fon Si. Qiiincw MA 02169 





• Prescriptions 

• Wheelchairs 

• Walkers 

• Home Health Aids 



• Bath & Safety Equiptment 

• Orthopedic Support 

• Support Hosiery 

• Surgical Supplies 

Free Local Delivery 



Diabetic Shoes 
Diabetic Supplies 
Ostomy Supplies 
Cards & Gifts 




ART AND MUSIC room inside the city's first-ever senior center which will be dedicated today 
(Thursday) at 4 p.m. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble 



Prescription refill line 
Sat 9-4 
Mon-Fri 86:30 



Tel 617-773-7733 

Fax 617-773-8372 

wvvw.baxterpharmacy.com 





^ 



KIP ORLANDO'S 

men's hairstyling 



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/Wen's Hairstyling in a Barbershop Atmosphere 



New Hours: Tues - Fri 9-8, Sat 9-6 • Appt. or walk-ins welcome 
261 E. Squantum St., N. Quincy, MA 02171 • 617-786-8545 



ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY 



• Exdting Activities & 
Social Programs 

• Trusted, Caring Staff 

• Individualized Personal Care 

• Coordination of Healthcare 
Appointments 

• Medication Management 

• Restaurant-Style Dining 

• Spacious Apartments 

• Transportation to 
Shopping &. more! 

Welch Healthcare & Retirement Group is a 
family-owned company celebrating 60 years 
of quality service to older adults. 



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at Hancock Park 
Assisted Living Community 

1 64 Parkingway 
Quincy, MA 02169 

60 Years of 
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Sr. Vice President, 
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(617)328-8300 

382 Quincy Ave. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

www.«asl«niiiisuraiKe.coiii 



27 lOCditHOBV 



Thui-Mlay, JuJy 2, 2009 Tl&e Quincy Siui Page 13 



City Receives 4*** National Community 
Development Award In One Year 



Planets Magic Show At Crane Library 



The City of Quincy was 
recently presented with 
the John A. Sasso National 
Community Development 
Award during the National 
Community Development 
Association's annual con- 
ference. 

The announcement was 
made by Mayor Thomas P. 
Koch and Planning Director 
Dennis E. Harrington. 

This recognition rep- 
resents the fourth national 
award the City's Department 
of Planning and Community 
Development has won over 
the past year. 

Two Residents 

Graduate From 

St. Anselm 

Two local students re- 
cently received degrees 
from Saint Anselm College 
in Manchester, N.H. 

They are: 

Jennifer Lorenz, who 
graduated with a degree in 
English. 

Kevin Richardson, de- 
gree in criminal justice. 



^ALWAYS BUYING^ 
NEW& OW 



The award recognizes 
communities that exemplify 
the spirit of the Community 
Development Block Grant 
program by showcasing 
its good works through the 
activities and events dur- 
ing National Community 
Development Week, which 
was most recently observed 
across the country from 
April 13-17. 

The city received this 
award last year, and once 
before in recent years. 

"Once again, we had a 
very strong application, due 
to the fact that our Com- 
munity Development Week 
events included the involve- 
ment of the Deputy Regional 
Director of the United States 
Department of Housing and 
Urban Development and 
from Congressman William 
Delahunt's office," Har- 



rington said. 

"We greatly appreciate 
the support of Congressman 
Delahunt and 'HUD' with 
respect to these vital pro- 
grams." 

Mayor Koch said, "I am 
very pleased with the Na- 
tional Community Devel- 
opment Association's con- 
tinued recognition of our 
Community Development 
Week activities. 

"I especially want to 
thank Dennis E. Harrington, 
planning director, and Nan- 
cy A. Callanan, community 
development director, and 
their staff in the Department 
of Planning and Community 
Development. This award 
recognizes our efforts to 
provide a better quality of 
life for youth, seniors, and 
low-income individuals 
throughout this great city." 



TAJ 

COINS 



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Nursery School 

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For Summer & Fall 

781-843-8030 

12 Elm St., Braintree 
NF.AYc 2nd floor 



PRESCHOOL & PRE-K 
HALF DAY (am or pm) 

FULL DAY PROGRAMS 

Ages 2.9-5 years 

• Before & After School 
• Summer Programs 

•Educating young children for 
over 25 years. 
•Art, Music and Gym Programs. 

wwwJollipoptreekids.com 




Granite Medical Welcomes 



Leon Shtttrmaii, MD 

Cardiology 

Dr. Shturman is board certified in internal medicine, 
cardiovascular diseases, and nuclear cardiology with 
special competence in adult echocardiography. He is 
a graduate of Nizhniy Novgorod Medical Academy in 
Russia, the University of Texas in Arlington and the 
University of North Texas Health Science Center at 
Fort Worth. 

Dr. Shturman completed an internship and a fellowship 
in cardiology at Tufts/St. Elizabeth's Medical Center and 
a fellowship in Cardiac CT/MRI at Massachusetts 
General Hospital. 

Dr Shturman is aaively involved in clinical research and teaching and is recognized 
nationally for his expertise in cardiology. He has authored numerous publications, 
textbook chapters, and clinical studies. 

Dr. Shturman will be pining Granite Medical in July 2009. 




@ 



Granite Medical 

Atrius Health 



Crown Colony Medical Center j 500 Congress St., Quincy 
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The eight planets in 
the Solar System are retir- 
ing their erstwhile brother 
planet Pluto and children 
ages 5 and older are invited 
to the party Tuesday, July 7, 
at 7 p.m. in the large meet- 
ing room at the Thomas 



Crane Public Library, 30 
Washington St. 

Pluto, long regarded as 
the ninth planet but recently 
knocked down as just an- 
other big rcK'k orbiting the 
Sun, will be the star of "The 
Planets Magic Show," con- 



ducted by the innovative 
magician Debbie O'Carroll 
The young audience will 
learn about solar system as 
they help Debbie to plan a 
magical party for the for 
mer planet The program is 
sponsored by the Quincy 
Arts Council 



Concert On Crane Library Lawn July 9 



Composer and musician 
David Polansky will present 
a rollicking concert of songs 
both old and new, some- 
times humorous, sometimes 
serious, Thursday, July 9, at 
10 a.m. on the front lawn of 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington St. 

The program is suitable 



for children of all ages, es- 
pecially the very young, ac- 
companied by an adult. In 
ca.se of inclement weather, 
the concert will be held in 
the large meeting room of 
the library. 

Polansky 's frequently 
humorous, sometimes seri- 
ous, but always clever and 



Insurance 

STRATEGIES 



liy Jim SiMvan 



CHECKED YOUR HOMEOWNERS POLICY LATELY? 

If you have not reviewed your surance agent. 



homeowners policy lately, it is 
probably time you did because 
you might be able to save some 
money. In particular, homeown- 
ers who have made recent im- 
provements to their homes may 
benefit from reviewing discounts 
that insurance compames offer for 
improvements, such as installing 
sprinkler systems and deadbolts, 
that make homes a better risk 
Insurers may even offer a good 
discount for simply replacing the 
rubber hoses on washing machines 
with no-burst stainless steel hoses 
because water damage related 
to leaks from washing machine 
hoses accounts for a significant 
amount of insurance payouts. Of 
course, making this simple switch 
also can save homeowners a lot of 
aggravation. For information on 
other discounts, contact your in- 



If you've improved the safety 
of your home by installing a spnn- 
kler system or alarm system, you 
are probably eligible for a discount 
on your home insursmce policy 
Please call JAMES J. SULLIVAN 
INSURANCE AGENCY at 617- 
328-8600 to arrange an insurance 
consultation. We offer policies 
for homes, condos, townhouses, 
and apartments. Our staff always 
looks for ways to save you money 
and moves quickly to process fair, 
prompt settlement in the event of a 
claim. We are located at 151 Han- 
cock Street. 

Note: Raising the deductible 
on your homeowners insurance, 
which is the portion of a claim 
that comes out of your pocket, i.v 
the easiest way to cut insurance 
costs. 



www.Jsulliyaninsuranc9.com 



engaging, appeals to every- 
one from presch(X)lers to 
grandparents with lyrics that 
deal with all aspects of the 
human condition. 

The concert is sponsored 
by the Fnends of the Thomas 
Crane Public Librarv 



The All New 



school o/ music 

All Ages. All Lrvels. All Mttsic. 



located 10 min. from Quincy Center 

Make Music 

this 

Summer! 

Call for info. 

on our 
2009 Summer 
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• PRIVATE INSTRUCTION FOR ALL 

INSTRUMBfTS& VOICE 

Guitar. Bass, Drums, Piano, 

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Bassoon .Trumpet, Trombone, 
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Arranging, Songwnting, 
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• ENSEMBLE PROGRAM 

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77 Spring Street 
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City Hall Plaza 

Room 242 
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cityofbostoncu.com 



CITY OF BOSTON 

y CREDIT UNION 




Page 14 Tlie Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 2009 




LT. DAN MINTON 



A Job Well Done 

On Saturday, June 20, at approximately 9:30 a.m.. Of- 
ficers Paul Matthews and Brian Raherty were dispatched 
to the area of Sagamore Av- 
enue on a report of "possible 
child abuse." 

While enroute, the dis- 
patcher informed the officers 
that a Verizon operator had 
called to report a phone call 
from a five year old male 
child, who stated that his fa- 
ther had physically assaulted 
his older sister (10 years old) 
yesterday afternoon. The offi- 
cers arrived at the door of the 
home and were greeted by the 

five year old, who stated that only he and his sister were 
home because both parents were working. A quick search 
of the apartment confirmed there were no adults in the 
apartment. 

Officer Flaherty requested detectives from the Special 
Investigations Unit respond to the scene. Officer Mat- 
thews interviewed the five-year-old caller about the as- 
sault. The victim said that he and his sister were getting 
into the rear seat of the family car in the driveway yes- 
terday, when his sister dropped a small piece of a cook- 
ie onto the back seat. The vicUm said that their father 
kicked her sister under the chin. 

Officer Matthews then interviewed the victim/sister 
and asked her if what her brother said was true. She 
started to speak, then hesitated, shook her head and then 
replied, "I don't want my daddy to go to jail, please don't 
take my daddy away." 

The officers assured the children that they were there 
to get them and their parents help, so that no one gets hit 
again. The officers noted a reddish mark under her chin, 
and upon closer inspection, the right side of her face ap- 
pearing to be discolored. 

When asked if she had any other injuries, the victim 
stuck out her tongue, revealing a small laceration to the 
right side of her tongue. She then became visibly up- 
set and started cry, but the officers comforted her and 
reiterated that they were there to help. 

At this time, a woman came out of another apartment 
and the children identified her as an aunt, but she did 
not speak English. Officer Matthews asked the boy what 
his father was wearing on his feet at the time he kicked 
the victim and he showed the officer a pair of size 10 
white New Balance tennis shoes. 

The officers asked the victim a few more questions, 
but stopped after the victim again pleaded, "Don't take 
my father away." A few minutes later, both parents ar- 
rived home to take both children to a birthday party 
in New Hampshire. 

The officers informed the parents of what they learned, 
then placed the father, a 42 year old Quincy resident, 
under arrest for Assault and Battery with a Dangerous 
Weapon, (shod foot) and transported him to the station 
for booking. 

The New Balance shoes were taken as evidence, along 
with photos of the injuries. Officer Matthews filed verbal 
and written reports with the Department of Children and 
Families, who stated that they would be responding im- 
mediately to investigate the incident of the assault and 
the abandonment of the children. 

Nice Work! 

G 

BE SURE TO: lock your car doors and remove valu- 
ables, boxes, bags and other enticing items. This week, 
car breaks were up considerably but many times it can be 
linked to unlocked doors. These types of breaks are usu- 
ally done by kids looking for money, but take other items 
of value that they may be able to sell. 

There are more unreported breaks out there, but the 
owners do not contact the Police because nothing, or 
something of low value is missing. 

The Police Department encourages all victims to call 
so that we may be able to gather additional information, 
iwhich may lead to the apprehension of the thieves. . 



QUINCY POLICE HOT SPOTS 





$15 Men's Haircut 
$12 Haircnt for Boys 
VBlioUted Tanning; $20/nAontli 
$5 Drop-Off Shoe Shine 

(Wa3id for New CnttonMrs & W«d. Only) 

Op«a Mon.-Sat. • Free Internet Caft 
1212 Hanoock Street, Quincy Next to Cltizeas Bank 

617-934-4920 www.caewcutzquiricy.com^ 



QUINCY POLICE STATIST ICS: JUNE 19 - 26 

Total Calls for Service : U14 

Total Arrests : 40 

Total Stolen Motor Vehicles : None 

FRIDAY, JUNE 19 

LARCENY, 1:39 pjn., 24 Gladstone St. Past. Nail 
gun. Complaint for larceny less. 

LARCENY, 3:56 p jn., 195 Burgin Parkway. Wallet/ 
past. Wallet around one week ago, has suspect info and 
location of wallet. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 20 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 8:57 a jn., McDonald's, 
473 Southern Artery. In progress inside. 784 states a 
party down on the lawn. No EMS transport. 784 wants 
xray to return for someone complaining of "neck pain." 
One to QMC. Disorder to Assault and Battery. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 9:56 a.m., 
Louis Crossing, 1269 Sea St. Business. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:56 p jn., 18 Charles- 
mount Ave. To car. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:59 p jn., 77 Adams St . 
Motor vehicle. Caller said they never got in. 2001 Toyota 
Corolla, color blue. 

LARCENY, 7:29 p jn., Dunkin Donuts, 550 Adams 
St. See manager. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 21 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 3:08 
p.m., 67 Verchild St. Male. Caller states someone just 
broke into his house and when he noticed someone was 
home he left. 5' 10", black hair, dark skin. Unknown cloth- 
ing description. K-9 track ended at 8 Bennington St. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:41 p.m., 7 Canton 
Rd. Driver's side window. 

MONDAY, JUNE 22 

LARCENY, 11:08 a.m., 1515 Hancock St. Lap top. 

LARCENY, 1:29 p.m., 97 Macy St. Past. Items stolen 
in the past. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 2:29 p jn., 166 Billings 
Rd. Neighbor. 

LARCENY, 3:47 p.m., 83 Woodcliff Rd. Past. Lar 
ceny of wallet past. 

LARCENY, 4:03 p.m., 495 Southern Artery Run 
ning. Arrest made. One behind Wendy's, one in store. 
White male, black sweatshirt. Shoplift to larceny. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 10 p.m., O'Rourke 
Playground, 503 Quarry St. Jumped. Two youths all 
bloody went into business stated they were jumped. Two 
male victims: one has several lacerations to the face and 
near the eye; second has a bump on his head. Both ran 
into Firefly's, two transported to QMC. 

TUESDAY. JUNE 23 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY,9:21 ajn.,975 Southern 
Artery. Broken window. Driver's window smashed. 

INDECENT EXPOSURE, 2:29 pjn., 259 BUlings 
Rd. Male. Navy blue Jeep. Suspect motor vehicle located 
on Hamilton St. Arrest for open and gross lewdness. 

LARCENY, 6: 17 pjn.. Quarry Hills Animal Hospi- 
tal, 406 WiUard St. By check. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:12 a.m., Canniff 
Monument Co., 34 Intervale St. Monuments. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:45 ajn., Sew Fisti- 
cated Fabrics, 97 Beale St. Graffiti on sign on side of 
building. On Newport Avenue side of building. Private 
property: billboard. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:08 pjn., 11 Harrison 
St. Motor vehicle. Spray painted car. 

THURSDAY. nJNE 25 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 1:13 ajn.. Cottage Ave. 
and Hancock St. Head injury. Male bleeding from the 



head. Male fled through the alley towards the Parkingway ; 
dark jacket, white male, mid 20s, jeans, black jacket. Vic- 
tim to QMC, report on A&B. Appears suspect knocked 
victim over with no other purpose. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 1 :57 ajn., 90 
Quarry St. Dwelling. Can't tell if anything is missing but 
doesn't believe so. Nothing taken. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 8:04 a.m., 
Kentucky Fried Chicken, 707 Hancock St. Business. 
Freezer door open, money missing. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 9:29 a.m., 
17 Richard St. Dwelling. Laptop and jewelry known 
missing. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 10:06 
a.m., 19 Richard St. Dwelling. White male, 20-30 years 
old, 155 pounds, no shirt, missing some teeth was try- 
ing to break in when confronted by victim. Suspect then 
pulled a knife. 

LARCENY, 10:49 ajn., 235 South St. Past X Box 
360, game, iPod. Male suspect appears currently homeless 
but was residing in Hull. Complaint submitted. 

LARCENY, 12:20 p.m.. Captain's Cove Marina, 
100 Coveway. Lobster traps. Two were stolen sometime 
between June 22 and June 24. 

LARCENY, 2:36 pjn., 18 Yardarm Ln. Past. Bag 
with very important things taken. Blue nylon backpack 
containing $ 1 1 cash and a sidekick cell phone stolen from 
rear steps. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:57 pjn., 42 Harrison 
St. Basement. Broken windows; graffiti on walls. No 
charges at this time. Parents advised. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 3:38 pjn., 18 
Miriam St. Dwelling . Sony 47-inch TV and jar of change 
known missing 

LARCENY, 3:50 p.m., 130 Faxon Rd Past. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 5:43 p.m.,87 Garfield 
St. Broken windows. Reports someone threw a rock into 
a bedroom window. Has witness. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:40 p.m., 530 WiUard 
St. Vehicle. Two windows smashed out of vehicle. 

□ 

STOLEN MOTOR VEHICLES: None. 

□ 

CAR BREAKS: Bird Street, Weymouth Street, 
Clive Street, Webster Street, Walnut Street, Des 
Moines Road, Vassall Street, Quincy Street, Glover 
Avenue, Edwin Street, 100 block of Billings Street, 
Germain Avenue, Harvard Street, Brook Street, Whit- 
well Street, Prospect Avenue, Ryden Street, Martell 
Road, 200 block Independence Avenue. 

Q 

BREAKS AND ATTEMPTED BREAKS: Miri- 
am Street, Richards Street, 100 block Quarry Street, 
1200 block Sea Street. 



If you have information on the above crimes, drug 
activity or any crime, please call the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 617-745-5764 or log onto the 
following website: http://tinyiirl.com/ytf6td. 

If you wish to report suspicious drug activity, call 
the Itatig Hot-Line at 617-328-4527. You will not be 
required to identify yourself, but it could help. If you 
wish to make an appointment to view the R^pbstcTed 
Sex Offenders book, call Detective Cindy Walsh at 
617-745-5751. 

If you wish to contact the Crime PreveDtkm Officar 
for tips OT conmients, my direct line is 617-745-5719. 
My e-mail address is dniinton@cix]uincyjna.us 

"Lt. Dan Minton 



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Quincy, Ma 02169 



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Thursday, July 2, 2009 Xlie Q\&incy Stan Page 15 




FIRE SAFETY 

by Captain Tom Lydns 

Fire Prevention Bureau 
Quincy Fire Department 



Best Western Adams Inn Receives 
Director's Award For Quality 



Leave The Fireworks To Professionals 



In an effort to support 
the State Fire Marshal and 
his news conference on July 
l''^ with the President of the 
NFPA, Jim Shannon, I'll 
take some time to hi lite the 
pitfalls of using illegal fire- 
works. 

On July 4™, throughout 



It is illegal to transport know where year after year 
fireworks into Massachu- 1 am involved with much of 
setts, even if they are pur- the permitting process for 
chased legally elsewhere, those displays within this 
Illegal fireworks can be con- City. Even then, considering 
fiscated on the spot, as they the crowds and the nature 
can be as well if purchased of explosives, I must trust 
through the mail or on line. 
The private sale of fire- 

the country, more fires are works has its penalty, in- 
reported than on any other eluding imprisonment and 

day. Fireworks account for seizure. Possession does as 

half of those fires. Risk of well, while seizure is man- 
injury from fireworks is 2 !^ datory. 

times higher for children 5 In our own state there 

to 14 years of age. In 2007 have been multiple fatalities illegal fireworks. Enjoy your 

alone, nationwide, 9,800 over the years and numer- 

people were treated for ous serious bum incidents. 

fireworks related injuries at Unfortunately for most, the 

hospital emergency rooms, regrets occur after the dam- 

The year before, fireworks age is done. Illegal, unsu- 

caused an estimated 32,600 pervised, possibly used in a 

reported fires, including congested outing like atmo- 

1,700 structure fires, 600 sphere, fireworks can lead 

vehicle fires, 30,300 outside to circumstances no one can 

fires. There were 6 civil- anticipate, while they can be 

ian deaths and $34 million avoided. 1 recall hearing of 

in direct property damage one incident when a power- 

(NFPA Fireworks report, by ful firecracker was thrown, 

and a young child picked 
it up off of the ground as it 
exploded. I won't convey 
the outcome of the incident; 
suffice it to say however. 



The Best Western Adams 
Inn in Quincy recently re- 
ceived the Best Western Di 
rector's Award for outstand- 
ing quality standards. 

The award recognizes 
Best Western International 
Hotels scoring in the top 20 
percent of all 2,4(X) North 
American properties in 
cleanliness and maintenance. 
Hotels must also meet Best 
in the wisdom of State code Western's requirements for 
and the professionalism of ^^^'8" ^"^ ^igh customer 
those certified to conduct ^^^vice scores to quality for 
the display. I am always the distinction, 
relieved when a display is "The Director's Award is 

successful, but particularly an important symbol of sue- 
when it is over, cess," said Bob Galligan. 
Don't take a chance with Innkeeper. "This Award con- 
firms the Best Western Inn's 
holiday while celebrating commitment to providing 
it without a regrettable out- quality accommodations for 
come. Leave the fireworks our guests. Our housekeep- 



L< Rated at 29 Hancock 
St., the Best Western Adams 
Inn features 98 rooms and 7 
suites on the Neponset Riv- 
er, along with function and 
meeting space for up to 3(K) 
at the Gazebo (seasonally), 
and 2(K) people in the Con- 
stitution Pavilion. 

The Adams Pub and 
Deck is a water side res- 



Airport, free parking, free 
deluxe continental break- 
fast, free cable IV and 
HBO. Iaundr>-r()<)m on site, 
free 24-hour toffee cafe 

Best Western Interna- 
tional IS the worlds larg- 
est hotel chain, providing 
marketing, reservations and 
operational support to over 
43K) independent!) owned 



taurant featunng lunch and and operated member hotels 
dinner. 

Outside pool (seasonal), 
free shuttle service to and 
from Logan International 



in 80 countries and territo- 
ries worldwide For more 
information visit www. 
bestwestern com 



to the professionals. Happy 

41 HI 




John Hall). 

These aren't casual re- 
sults, nor should the acqui- 
sition of fireworks from an 
adjacent state be taken light- 



ly as well. Fireworks are il- that the consequences were 
legal in Massachusetts. The permanent. That outcome 



possession and use of all 
fireworks by private citizens 
of this state is illegal. This 
includes sparklers which 
burn at 1800 degrees Fahr- 
enheit. 



wasn't anticipated when 
someone decided to display 
fireworks illegally. 

The precautions associ- 
ated with a professional dis- 
play alone are extensive. I 




Quincy Typewriter Serme 

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SUMMER SPECIAL 

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Starting at $229®« and up while they last! 

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YOGA 

ON The Beach 

Join us for gentle yoga 

2 mornings a week at 2 

great locations in Quincy: 

Post Island Road 

Tues.,June 30-Sept. 15 



Merrymount Beach 

Thurs., July 2-Sept. 17 

Time: 

6:30-7:30am 

Cost: 

MO drop in* 

(please bring a mat, towel & water) 

For more info, contact 
Christine Way-Cotter 

{certified Kripclu yoi^a teacher) 

617-472-7550 

'A portion of the proceeds 

will be donated to the Post 

Island and MerryYnount Beach 

Association and The Quincv 

Environmental Network 



ing and maintenance depart- 
ments have worked hard to 
achieve this level of excel- 
lence." 




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Massage 



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7I)a>s 



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See Manet's Prenatal Team 



Marl ha Karchcrc, M I ) 
Director oj Maternal and Child Health 



.lennifer Sabir, Ml) 

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FOOTTNOTES 

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Diplomate, American Board of Podiatrk Surgery 
Dipioinate, AiierkM IhMnI of Podiatrk Orthopedics 

THE ROOT CAUSE OF MOST FOOT PROBLEMS 

In 20 years, many feet way to prevent the oblitera- 
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sinus tarsi, which Is located 
between the talus and cal- 
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Since we average up 



tice. It is done at a local 
hospital in day surgery. The 
patient is back in shoes or 
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Check out wwwhyprcure. 



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Page 16 Tlie Qi&incy S\ut Thursday, July 2, 2009 




JOSEPH ODECJARDE reads patriotic poems and tributes to 
firefighters and police officers as well as veterans and other 
service men and women at St. Ann's School. 



PRE-KINDERGARTEN CLASS at St. Ann's School shows 
their patriotism with American Flags and singing *'I Love My 



Flag." The singing performance was among the highlights at 
the school's "Hero Celebration Dav." Photos B\ Paul Coletti 



St. Ann's School Hosts 'Hero Celebration Day' 



St. Ann's School in Wol- 
laston recently hosted a 
"Hero Celebration Day" in 
honor of the many heroes 
who protect the citizenry 
each and every day from 
harm. 

Every day heroes are 
amongst us, yet, they are 
seldom, if ever, formally 
thanked. 

Mrs. Lois Carme, who 
is both the art and music 
teacher at St. Ann's School, 
prepared the nearly 300 stu- 
dents in an extensive music 
and art program to honor 
the several different cat- 
egories of heroes. The stu- 
dents committed to memory 
nine patriotic songs and 
prayers, honoring the difter- 
ent branches of service, law 
enforcement, police and fire 
departments. 



Mrs. Carme contacted the 
Boston and Quincy Fire De- 
partments, the Boston and 
Quincy Police Departments, 
veterans of World War 11 
and the Korean War, mem- 
bers of the Army, Navy, Air 
Force, Coast Guard, Nation- 
al Guard and the Reserves. 

Seventeen heroes re- 
sponded and were in atten- 
dance as honored guests. 
Nay of these heroes are fam- 
ily members of students who 
attend St. Ann's School. 

The heroes were escorted 
into the auditorium by two 
first grade students and were 
seated in a special white- 
ribboned area. At the end of 
this wonderful program, the 
heroes were escorted from 
the auditorium to the strains 
of "America The Beauti- 
ful." 




Honored Guests At Flag Day, 
Hero Recognition Assembly 

Armed Forces 



MASTERS OF CEREMONIES Richard Chadhaury and 
Devin O'Brien, recently graduated eighth grade students at St. 
Ann's School, returned to the school for the heroes program. 



St. Ann's School in Wol- 
laston honored the follow- 
ing guests at its recent Flag 
Day/Hero Recognition As- 
sembly. 

Quincy, Boston 
Fire Departments 
Firefighter Paul Keams 
Firefighter William Knox 
Lt. George Wirtz 
Firefighter Edward Nardone 
Firefighter Timothy Ho 
Firefighter Joseph Montoya 

Quincy, Boston 
Police Departments 
Lt. Gerard Bailey 
Office David Coiletti 
D.A.R.E. Officer John 
Grazioso 
Sgt. Gary Ryan 
Officer Joseph Keaveney 
Officer William Mitchell 



Representatives 

Serving in the U .S . Army: 
Robert Noble, veteran of 
World War II, member of 
the 87th Infantry, past State 
Commander of the Ameri- 
can Prisoners of War. 

Serving in both the Army 
and the Marines: 

Eugene O'Meara, served 
in the Army and Marines 
during World War II and 
Korean War. 

Sgt. Camille Bastien 

Serving in the Navy: 

Ralph Dearde©» JCorean 
War 

Thomas Carroll. Subma- 
rine Squadron 10 

Lt. Erik Edstrom, yvbo is 
serving in Afghai^stan 




LOIS CARME, music and art director at St. Ann's School, coordinated the school's recent Flag 
Day/Hero Recognition Day. In the foreground are some of the heroes who were honored guests 
at the assembly. 




POLICEMAN'S PRAYER is recited by students in Grade 1-5 at St. Ann's School. 




ROBERT NOBLE, a VS. Army veteran and former Prisoner of War, and Eugene O'Meara, 

Army and Marine Corps veteran of Worid War and Korea, salute at St. Ann's Hero Celebra- aN HONORED GUEST is escorted from the auditorium at the end of the Hero Celebration Day 
tion Day. program held recently at St. Ann's School in WoUaston. 



' • ■.I 



rhursda> . July 2, 2(K>9 Tlie Qiiincy Sixn Pagi 1 7 



Adams Walk, Fountain Dedicated At Merry mount Park 



More than 120 years af- 
ter Charles Francis Adams 
II donated Merrymount Park 
to the people of Quincy, his 
vision for a beautiful, pas- 
sive place for the communi- 
ty to enjoy has been realized 
after the recent dedication 
of the long-planned formal 
garden. 

The centerpiece gran- 
ite fountain, donated by 
the Quincy Partnership, is 
running and the public is 
welcome to enjoy the new 
walkways, the re-location of 
several memorials, benches, 
a new treescape and flowers 
that are part of the project. 

The new project - called 
Adams Walk - is being 
funded by a $100,000 state 
grant secured by state Rep. 
Ronald Mariano and a park 
improvement bond through 
the city's hotel room tax, ac- 



cording to Mayor Thomas 
Koch, who restarted the 
dormant park restoration 
shortly after taking office. 

"It is truly a beautiful 
spot and a wonderful testa- 
ment to the Adams family 
vision for the park and all 
the people who donated so 
much to make it happen, 
Koch said, who recognized 
several residents who con- 
tributed to the project. 

Planning for the park 
started more than 10 years 
ago. 

Edward Keohane, chair- 
man of the Quincy Partner- 
ship, said the park's long- 
term impact was worth the 
wait. 

"This will be something 
that generations of Quincy 
residents will be able to en- 
joy," Keohane said. 




MEMBERS OF THE Quincy Partnership in front of the gran- 
ite fountain, the centerpiece of the recently dedicated Adams 
Walk Park at Merrymount Park with fountain sculptor Ed- 
ward Monti (fourth from left) of Monti C>ranite. With Monti 



';;y®iSffii 



are (from left): Mayor Tom Koch, Bob ( urr>. Mark Bertman. 
Bob (iailigan. .Mike .McFarland. Edward Keohane. .hte Shea. 
Sandra Williams, .jim .Mullane> and Marianne Peak. The 
fountain wa.s donated by the Quincv Partnership. 

I'hotos h\ Alu ia (iardner 





WREATH IS PLACED at the World War 11 Memorial h> 1 homas Stansbur\ (left), director ot 
Quincy Veterans Services, and Robert Noble, a veteran of World War 11. In the backsround is 
the Morrisette American Legion Po.st Color (iuard. 




QUINCY PUBLIC SCHOOL Music Department chairw(»man Iracy <)"Sulli\an sinjjs the Na- 
tional .Anthem at the recent dedication of the formal jjarden and granite fountain at \Urr> 
mount Park. .Vt right is Ma>or 1 homas Koch and Kristen Powers. e\ecuti%e director of the 
Quincy Park, Forestry and Cemetery Department. 



GRANITE FOUNTAIN, the centerpiece of the recently dedicated formal garden at Merry- 
mount Park, in operation. 





LOCAL RESIDENTS ATTENDED the recent dedication of the formal garden at Merrymount 
Park. 



QUINCY PARK BOARD gather at the recently dedicated fountain. From left: Recreation Direc- 
tor Barry Welch, State. Rep. Ron Mariano. Park Board Chairman Connie Driscoll, Park Board 
member Josephine Shea, Board member Brvant Carter, former Board member Gerard Coletta, 
Mayor Tom Koch, Board member Brad Croall, Board member Jay Steams. Board member 
David McCarthy, Park Commissioner Kristen Powei-s and Board member Jack Nigro. 



Page 16 The Q^Lincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 2009 




JOSEPH ODEGARDE reads patriotic poems and tributes to 
firefighters and police officers as well as veterans and other 
service men and women at St. Ann's School. 



PRE-KINDERGARTEN CLASS at St. Ann's School shows 
their patriotism with American Flags and singing "I Love My 



Flag." The singing performance was among the highlights at 
the school's "Hero Celebration Dav." Photos B\ Paul Coletri 



St. Ann's School Hosts 'Hero Celebration Day' 



St. Ann's School in Wol- 
laston recently hosted a 
"Hero Celebration Day" in 
honor of the many heroes 
who protect the citizenry 
each and every day from 
harm. 

Every day heroes are 
amongst us, yet, they are 
seldom, if ever, formally 
thanked. 

Mrs. Lois Carme, who 
is both the art and music 
teacher at St. Ann's School, 
prepared the nearly 300 stu- 
dents in an extensive music 
and art program to honor 
the several different cat- 
egories of heroes. The stu- 
dents committed to memory 
nine patriotic songs and 
prayers, honoring the difter- 
ent branches of service, /aw 
enforcement, police and fire 
departments. 



Mrs. Cari tie co ntacted the 
Boston and Quincy Fire De- 
partments, the Boston and 
Quincy Police Departments, 
veterans of World War II 
and the Korean War, mem- 
bers of the Army, Navy, Air 
Force, Coast Guard, Nation- 
al Guard and the Reserves. 

Seventeen heroes re- 
sponded and were in atten- 
dance as honored guests. 
Nay of these heroes are fam- 
ily members of students who 
attend St. Ann's School. 

The heroes were escorted 
into the auditorium by two 
first grade students and were 
seated in a special white- 
ribboned area. At the end of 
this wonderful program, the 
heroes were escorted from 
the auditorium to the strains 
of "America The Beauti- 
ful." 




Honored Guests At Flag Day, 
Hero Recognition Assembly 



MASTERS OF CEREMONIES Richard Chadhaury and 
Devin O'Brien, recently graduated eighth grade students at St. 
Ann's School, returned to the school for the heroes program. 



St. Ann's School in Wol- 
laston honored the follow- 
ing guests at its recent Flag 
Day/Hero Recognition As- 
sembly. 

Quincy, Boston 
Fire Departments 
Firefighter Paul Keams 
Firefighter William Knox 
Lt. George Wirtz 
Firefighter Edward Nardone 
Firefighter Timothy Ho 
Firefighter Joseph Montoya 

Quincy, Boston 
Police Departments 
Lt. Gerard Bailey 
Office David Colletti 
D.A.R.E. Officer John 
Grazioso 
Sgt. Gary Ryan 
Officer Joseph Keaveney 
Officer William Mitchell 



Armed Forces 
Representatives 

Serving in the U .S . Army: 
Robert Noble, veteran of 
Worid War II, member of 
the 87th Infantry, past State 
Commander of the Ameri- 
can Prisoners of War. 

Serving in both the Army 
and the Marines: 

Eugene O'Meara, served 
in the Army and Marines 
during Worid War II and 
Korean War. 

Sgt. Camille Bastien 

Serving in the Navy: 

Ralph Oearde^,, Xorean 
War 

Thomas Carroll, Subma- 
rine Squadron 10 

Lt. Erik Edstrom, yfiho is 
serving in Afghanistan 




LOIS CARME, music and art director at St. Ann's School, coordinated the school s recent Flag 
Day/Hero Recognition Day. In the foreground are some of the heroes who were honored guests 
at the assembly. 




POLICEMAN'S PRAYER is recited by students in Grade 1-5 at St. Ann's School. 





ROBERT NOBLE, a VS. Army veteran and former Prisoner of War, and Eugene O'Meara, 

Army and Marine Corps veteran of World War and Korea, salute at St. Ann's Hero Celebra- AN HONORED GUEST is 'eicJrt^fi^th7 auditorium at the end of the Hero Celebration Day 

tion Day. program held recently at St. Ann's School in WoUaston. 



Thursda>,Jul> 2,20«9 Tbe Qixincv Sun Pajit 17 



Adams Walk, Fountain Dedicated At Merry mount Park 



More than 120 years af- 
ter Charles Francis Adams 
II donated Merrymount Park 
to the people of Quincy, his 
vision for a beautiful, pas- 
sive place for the communi- 
ty to enjoy has been realized 
after the recent dedication 
of the long-planned formal 
garden. 

The centerpiece gran- 
ite fountain, donated by 
the Quincy Partnership, is 
running and the public is 
welcome to enjoy the new 
walkways, the re-location of 
several memorials, benches, 
a new treescape and flowers 
that are part of the project. 

The new project - called 
Adams Walk - is being 
funded by a $100,000 state 
grant secured by state Rep. 
Ronald Mariano and a park 
improvement bond through 
the city's hotel room tax, ac- 



cording to Mayor Thomas 
Koch, who restarted the 
dormant park restoration 
shortly after taking ofHce. 

"It is truly a beautiful 
spot and a wonderful testa- 
ment to the Adams family 
vision for the park and all 
the people who donated so 
much to make it happen, 
Koch said, who recognized 
several residents who con- 
tributed to the project. 

Planning for the park 
started more than 10 years 
ago. 

Edward Keohane, chair- 
man of the Quincy Partner- 
ship, said the park's long- 
term impact was worth the 
wait. 

"This will be something 
that generations of Quincy 
residents will be able to en- 
joy," Keohane said. 




MEMBERS OF THE Quincy Partnership in front of the gran- 
ite fountain, the centerpiece of the recently dedicated Adams 
Walk Park at Merrymount Park with fountain sculptor Ed- 
ward Monti (fourth from left) of Monti (>ranite. With Monti 



are (from left): Mayor Tom Koch, Bob C'urr>. Mark Bertman. 
Bob Galligan. Mike McFarland, Edward Keohane. Joe .Shea. 
Sandra Williams, .lim Mullaney and .Marianne Peak, f hi 
fountain was donated b> the Quincv Partnership. 

f'lu'tns h\ Aliaa fiardnrr 





WREATH IS PLACED at the World War H Memorial by 1 homas Slansbur> (left), director ol 
Quincy Veterans Services, and Robert Noble, a veteran of W()rld War 11. In the backjiround is 
the Morrisette American Legion Post t olor (iuard. 




QUINCY PUBLIC SCHOOL Music Department chairwoman I racy OSullr>aii sinn" «ht Na- 
tional Anthem at the recent dedication of the formal garden and granite fountain at Merry 
mount Park. At right is Mayor Thomas Koch and Kristen Powers. executiM director ol thi 
Quincy Park. Forestry and Cemetery Department. 



GRANITE FOUNTAIN, the centerpiece of the recently dedicated formal garden at Merry- 
mount Park, in operation. 






i^:^'mm-^ 





fef:: 



LOCAL RESIDENTS ATTENDED the recent dedication of the formal garden ^k .\urr>mount 
Park. 



QUINCY PARK BOARD gather at the recently dedicated fountain. Frtim left: Recreati<m Direc- 
tor Barry Welch, State. Rep. Ron Mariano, Park Board Chairman Connie Driscoll, Park Board 
member Josephine Shea, Board member Bryant Carter, former Board member (Jerard Coletta, 
Mayor Tom Koch, Board member Brad Croall, Board member Jay Steams. Board member 
David McCarthy, Park Commissioner Kristen Powers and Board member Jack Nigro. 



Page 18 Tl&e QiUncy Sun Thursday, July 2, 2009 



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Dollars 
and $en$e 

by David Uffington 

Going 
"Green" One 
Step at a Time 

Along with reducing your 
impact on the earth's re- 
sources, "going green" can 
often save you money. And 
it doesn't necessarily have 
to involve a big lifestyle 
change. Here are some sim- 
ple steps you can take to live 
a bit "greener." 

At Home: 

• Buy local meats, dairy 
products and vegetables. 
Wash clothes in cold water 
and dry them on a line out- 
side. Shop garage sales or 
buy used instead of new. Buy 
a faucet filter and stop buying 
bottled water. Install ceiling 
fans and turn off the A/C. 

• Install a low-flow show- 
er head. Use a water drum to 
collect roof rainwater for wa- 
tering the garden and lawn. 

• Instead of using pesti- 
cides that contain chemicals, 
look for cheaper and safer 
alternatives. For example, 
sugar and boric acid is said to 
kill ants. 

At Work: 

The greenest way to go 
to work is not to go to work. 
Telecommuting saves on 
clothing costs, eating out, ve- 
hicle use and so much more. 
But if you have to show up, 
there are ways to "go green" 
at work. 



• Don't buy office supplies 
until you're sure you can't 
make do with what you have. 
Print double-sided pages. 
Make your own scratch pa- 
per out of the reverse side of 
paper that would ordinarily 
end up in the trash. Decide if 
software upgrades would let 
you get another six months or 
a year out of your computers. 
Lower (or raise) the thermo- 
stat one degree. 

• For commuting, keep 
your car tuned up to reduce 
emissions and increase your 
gas mileage. Reduce your 
highway speeds to save gas. 
Use public transportation, 
if possible, or walk, bike or 
carpxx)!. 

Not everything "green" is 
a money saver, however. 

• Compact fluorescent 
light bulbs cost more when 
you buy them, and you might 
have a problem getting rid of 
them later if stores in your 
area aren't signed up to col- 
lect and dispxjse of CFLs. 

• Green cleaning products 
cost more and are thought 
not to work as well. Look for 
products you can make your- 
self with simple ingredients. 

You don't have to "go 
green" all at once. Take it a 
few steps at a time and you 
could end up with a bonus: a 
less-expensive lifestyle. 

David Uffington regrets that he 
cannot personally answer reader 
questions, but will incorporate 
them into his column whenever 
possible. Write to him in care oj 
King Features Weekly Service. 
P.O. Box 536475. Orlando. FL 
32853-6475. or send e-mail to col- 
umnreply@gmail.com . 

© 2009 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



Adding, Upgrading A Deck: 
An Alternative To Vacation Spending 



of 



Instead 
pricey vaca 



Building Products, Inc. termites, insects and fungal rial because it is attractive, 
"When selecting your future decay. The wood product is easy to work with and is 
decking material, research placed into a depressurized naturally rot- and insect-re- 
all of your options to ensure cylinder. The cylinder is sistant. Cedar wood decking 
you're purchasing material filled with preservatives un- material has less than half 
yards. Upgrading or adding that best meets your needs." der high pressure that forces the swelling and shrinking 
a deck is a great way to take When making a decision them deeply into the wood, tendencies of other domes- 
advantage of outdoor living on your available decking When the process ends, the tic softwoods, 
spaces. options, you may want to cylinder is drained and the If cedar wood goes un- 



(ARA) - 
spending on 
tions, more Americans are 
turning to money-saving al- 
ternatives in their own back- 



Homeowners today are 
viewing their outdoor liv- 
ing space as extensions of 
their home. Among the 40 
million homeowners who 
have an available outdoor 



consider the three common 
types of decking material: 
Composite 
Representing 40 to 60 
percent of new decks, com- 
posite decking is the latest 



remaining preservative is treated, over time it will 

reused. Applying preserva- lose its natural golden hue 

tives is an attempt to slow and may turn a silver grey 

drying which means less color. The average lifespan 



shrinkage occurs and the 
surface of the wood remains 
smoother longer. 

Although pressure-treat- 
ed wood 



of cedar is roughly 10 years 
and, in order to double the 
living space, less than one- trend in outdoor living spac- smoother longer. lifespan, regular applica- 
third prep their decks appro- es. Composite decking is Although pressure-treat- tions of staining and water- 
priately for the season, ac- made from a blend of woods ed wood is usually found proofing are highly recom- 
cording to a Glidden brand and recycled plastic, vinyl at relatively low cost, it is mended, 
survey. If you're planning or acrylic materials that at high risk for moisture When you're ready to 
on using your outdoor living prolong the life of the deck, damage. In order to pro- begin creating or improving 
space this season, you may Although the initial price of tect a pressure-treated deck your outdoor living space, 
want to consider improving composite decking may be against weather and pre- research your options. Be 
or upgrading your current higher compared to other mature aging, the wood re- sure you're picking the best 
deck. types of wood, the expected quires regular power wash- available material to en- 
Although it now may lifespan can save money in ing and yearly application of sure your deck will last you 
seem like a challenging time the long run. stain and sealer. many more summer months 
to invest in your home, en- Many homeowners are Cedar to come, 
hancing your outdoor living attracted to composite deck- Cedar is another com- Courtesy ofARA content 
space can be cost-effective, ing because it provides the monly used decking mate- 
Exterior and replacement appearance of real wood. 



projects bring homeowners 
the best return on invest- 
ment, according to Remod- 
eling Magazine's annual 
Cost vs. Value report. 



requires little maintenance 
and typically comes with a 
longer warranty period. For 
example, TAMKO's Ever- 
Grain is backed by a 25 -year 



FLAVIN & FLAVIN REALf Y 

Spotlights 

Jim Murphy 

Member of the Sales Staff 



"Outdoor living has be- limited warranty, 
come an increasingly popu- "Composite decking re- 

lar trend over the last few quires no painting or stain- 
years," says Stephen Mc- ing which allows home- 
Nally, vice president of sales owners to spend more time 
and marketing for TAMKO enjoying their decks rather 

than working to maintain 

them," says McNally. 
Pressure-treated 
Pressure-treated wood 
contains preservatives that 
provide protection against 




Flavin & Flavin, a long-established, family-owned business since Febru- 
ary 1 925 located in Quincy Center is pleased to spotlight Jim Murphy as a 
Member of its Sales Staff. Jim is offering Seller and Buyer Representation as 
well as Rental assistance. 

Jim Murphy taught in the Business Department at North Quincy High School 
for 33 years retiring in 2003. He joined Flavin & Flavin 5 years ago and 
has had much success selling properties all over the South Shore and in 
Boston. 

Since 1925, Flavin & Flavin has provided friendly, quality and excellent 
services in Real Estate, Insurancfe, Apartment Rentals, Appraising, Property 
Investment and ManagementYou hiay contact Jim at 339-235-0856 or for more 
information, make a friendly call to Flavin & Flavin at 6 1 7-479- 1 000. 



income, these seminars are 
educational and recom- 
mended for all potential first 



Orriiqc 



49 Beale St., Quincy, MA 02170 
617-472-4330 

Afvwx RvoNy, inc. www.c2 1 annex .com 

Over 70 Seller and Buyer Agents 

specializing in Residential, Commercial 

Real Estate, Bank Owned Properties, 

Short Sales and Rentals 



Annex Real Estate School 

Offering Salesperson's, Broker's and Continuing Ed. classes 



\« 



Still Number One' 



Flavin & Flavin Realty 

M'SS HiiiKHK'k St..QmiK\ Cciilci' 



uwu !] 



617-479-1000 




Patrick J. Mulkern 

Happy 4th of July I 

Call me for a FREE opinion of Value! 

Office 617-773-5588 . CeU 617-590-9168 
www.cityviewrealestatc.com 



Neighborhood Housing Services 

Homebuying Workshop 

Set For July 14-16 

Buying your first home? time homebuyers. Partici- 
Not sure wiiere to begin? pants will have the opportu- 
What kind of mortgage is nity to speak with a lender 
right for you? How much to discuss many mortgage 
can you afford? options. 

Get these answers and Also covered at the 

many others when you at- workshop will be the legal 
tend one of our workshops, aspects of buying a home, 
Open to all, regardless of importance of home and 

lead inspections and other 
information. 

This workshop is a pre- 
requisite for first time home- 
buyers mortgage and grant 
programs, and is open to ev- 
eryone throughout the state, 
regardless of income. Our 
next workshop, sponsored 
by The Randolph Banking 
Collaborative, is scheduled 
for Tuesday, July 14 from 
5-9 p.m. and Thursday, July 
16 from 5-9 p.m. There is a 
$15 fee per person. 

The workshop will be 
held at Randolph Sav- 
ings Bank, 10 Cabot Place, 
Stoughton. 

Attendance at both ses- 
sions is necessary to receive 
your homebuying certifi- 
cate. 

Call 617-770-2227, ext. 
31 or visit www.neighbor- 
hoodhousin g.com for addi- 
tional information. 



CilUHew leil Estate 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Thursday, July 2, 2009 Tl&e QvLincy Sun Page 19 



FLYNN AUCTIONS 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

Auction to be held on the premises 

24 Temahigan Avenue, Oak Bluffs, MA 



July 2, 2009 @ 1 1 AM 




Classic Vineyard Dream Home sits on two and a half acres of oceanfront and includes a 
private beach and a 100' dock. It boasts spectacular views of West Chop Lighthouse, evening 
sunsets and active ferry/boating channel. Recent renovations have preserved classic elegance. 
The 3,000 square foot home features a total of 1 1 rooms; 4 bedrooms (including master 
suite), 5 total baths, 2 fireplaces, heated in-ground pool, spa and hot tubs. Expansive sunroom 
and deck overlook superb grounds, elaborate stonework and manicured landscaping. 

TERMS: $50,CXX) deposit in cash, certified or bank check at sale. Balance due withm thirty (30) days. Other terms, ^f any, an- 
nounced at sale. Robinson & Cole, L 1. P. One Boston Place, Boston MA 02 ' 08, Atty for Mortgagee Dukes County Registry of 
Deeds, Boot: 955 Page' 396 M/v i r «300 



PRIVATE SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION 

Auction to be held on the premises 

I I Bayberry Lane, Weston, MA 



Custom gated estate colonial with over 6100 sq ft of living space on 1 ,3 manicured, landscaped 
acres. Privately sited on culde-sac this beautiful home offers a lighted tennis/basketball court, 
spectacular bluestone patio, steam bath with shower, gourmet kitchen, game room, five bed- 
rooms, five full and two half baths. Incredible 10 ft ceilings, detailed moldings, open floor plan, 
enclosed yard, and more. Convenient to downtown Boston, major routes and schools 

1% Broker Participation • 6% Buyer's Premium • MA LiC #300 



FLYNN PROPERTIES 




Quincy - 1 3,863 SF commercial building on 24,200 SF lot. Fully 
occupied. Includes 90'xl 10' warehouse w/16' clearance. 35x20' 
refngerated space with 2 loading doors and dock, five pnvate 
offices totalling 800 +/- SF. Modem, updated, fully occupied. Off 
Rte. 3A near Southenn Artery. Offered at $ 1 ,350,000. 



[ 



FOR SALE or LEASE 




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Quincy - <oai ana Auto noay inop. 3,600+/- SF building. 
1 2' walls, 4 drive-in doors, steel tanks, full service Vita 
Root reporting system, Outside Kiosks, Gilbarco dispens- 
ers/5 Blend, Spray booth and frame machine. 




South Boston Seaport - 2,400 SF of Office/Commercial 
Space. Class B office Space. 2 onsite parking spaces. MBTA 
accessible via Silver Line from South Station. Sublet with 5 
years remaining. Below market @ $20/FT. 



NEED CASH FASTI 

SELL NOW AT AUCTION! 

Call for a quick assessment! 




Marshfield - Brand New Office Condos. Several units for sale. 
Ideal for medical/prof offices. 8 1 Car Parking, Elevator, Handicap 
lavatones. Central Air, Basement Storage, Excellent access just 
off exit 1 2 on Route 3. 5 layouts to choose from. Call for floor 
plans. Prices start at $269,000, 



[for LEASE 



Quincy- Multiple suites available in premier Cnown Colony Park loca- 
tion. Four suites available of Z247 SF 3,331 SF, 3.500 SF, arxj 7, 1 00 SF 
Contiguous to 1 0,43 1 SF Amenities indude fxitds. banking, shuttle 
service food service, health dub and mons. Parkng ratio is 35/ 1 .000 
FGF. Some turrvkey space availabte. Flexible terms, competrt^/e rents 




Quincy - Office Space for Lease. Premier space walking 
distance to Wollaston T Station. Space from 1 ,400+/- SF to 
1 2,400+/- SF full floor surtes, featunng creative design wrthm 
professional atmosphere. Below market rents. Full fee paid to 
cooperating brokers. 



Braintree - Office- v^uiiui,. v.," xic v...ui-trr. •/ j l.ia- ^'"ilc. 
749 SF located at 409 Pond at Gramte and Pond. Three execu- 
tive offices and an open admm/sales area good for 3 employees 
Pnvate entrance and bath. Storage space m unit plus basement 
space. Pnce Reduced to $157,500. 



v~ ^^ w% ^mii~ i^A^^v 1 


FOR SALE or LEASE] 












Weymouth - Industrial Complex featunng 3 Ind. buildings on 2 
+/- Acne comer lot Two attached buildings combine for a total of 
19,938 SR 16,795+/- sf ofwarehouse/manufactunng, 3,143+/- sf 
of office space plus 1 ,500 SF storage bidg. Active indus. park near 
exrts on Rte 3. High ceilings. Call for leasing terms. $ 1 .75 Million. 



Raynham - Located on Rte. 44 Auto mile close to Rts. 24 & 
495. 14,523 +/- SF building on approxiamately 2.5 acres featunng 
multiple sales offices, upper mezzanine offices, open show room & 
customer ser/ice area and large automotive sen/ice area. Offened 
at^l7000/monthNNN. 



(617) 479-9000 • DJFIynn.com • 1495 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 



Daniel 



^FlTnn 



Page 20 Tl&e Quiz&cy Siui Thursday, July 2, 2009 



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niiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mil iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii nil I iir 

Tips To T\irn Your Rental Space From Bland To Grand 



(ARA) - Moving into 
a new rental property and 
wondering how much your 
landlord will allow you to 
decorate to make it feel 
like your own? You're not 
alone. According to a recent 
Apartments.com survey, 90 
percent of renters will deco- 
rate when moving to a new 
apartment; with 81 percent 
decorating within the first 
three months of the move. 

Luckily, there are many 
landlord-approved updates 
that can turn the bland white 
walls of a rental into a warm 
and personal space. 

Living large 

In the living room, acces- 
sories such as clocks and art 
work will add personal style 
and a splash of color. Stra- 
tegically placed mirrors can 
also help the room appear 
larger in size. 

Worried about nail holes? 
New wall hooks from com- 
panies such as 3M attach 
using a removable adhesive 



that won't damage the walls. 
Or, vinyl wall stickers, like 
those from www.wisedecor. 
com, are another option to 
add design and color to the 
walls - and they peel off 
easily when you move out. 

Finally, focus on floors 
and windows. If your rental 
has less-than-perfect hard- 
wood floors or carpeted ar- 
eas, throw rugs are a perfect 
solution to add a soft touch, 
a hint of color throughout 
your space, or to cover up 
blemishes. Hanging curtains 
or drapes, such as the Hutlet 
drape from IKEA, can also 
be an inexpensive way to 
add soft texture and make a 
personal design statement. 
Add beauty to the bath 
As one of the most used 
rooms, the bath should be a 
beautiful and inviting space. 
However, most rental bath- 
rooms are small and border 
on the blah side. Installing 
a Moen curved shower rod, 
hanging a new shower cur- 



tain and accessorizing with 
plush towels can pull the 
look of the bathroom togeth- 
er, provide more space and 
give a more upscale feel. 

Swapping out your show- 
erhead is another option that 
not only creates a more en- 
joyable spa-like showering 
experience, but can also save 
water. Moen's new Nurture 
water-efficient shower- 
heads, available at Lowe's, 
feature three distinct settings 
to suit any mood - and they 
use up to 30 percent less 
water while still providing 
a superior, full -body shower 
experience. They're a great 
way to help you enjoy your 
daily shower and lower your 
monthly bills. 

Kitchen rental re-do 
Cook up some style in 
the kitchen by adding color- 
ful placemats and a center- 
piece, such as plant or glass 
vase, on the kitchen table or 
breakfast bar. Posting pic- 
tures of family, friends and 



pets on the refrigerator can 
also help make your rental 
feel more like home. Final- 
ly, add a decorative chalk- 
board or dry-erase board to 
help spruce up the kitchen 
walls and provide a clutter- 
less place for notes, recipes 
and grocery lists. 

Love to cook? Start by 
purchasing quality knives 
and a cutting board to keep 
the countertops safe. Next, 
add compact - yet multi- 
functional appliances - such 
as a Cuisinart Griddler Jr. to 
allow you to grill burgers or 
paninis indoors. 

Finally, upgrade the 
kitchen faucet to a high- 
arc, pulldown model. It 
will make a beautiful focal 
point in the kitchen. It will 
also make cleaning or fill- 
ing large pots and pans, and 
cleaning fresh produce easy, 
while also allowing you to 
reach outside the sink to wa- 
ter plants or fill a bucket. 

Soon after moving in, 



your rental space will go 
from bland to grand and will 
feel like home in no time. 

For more information 
about showerheads, faucets 



and accessories from Moen, 
visit moen.com, or call (800) 
BUY-MOEN. 

Courtesy ofARAcontent 



Charles Pages Joins 
Century 21 Annex Realty 



Phyllis Rudnick and Ar- 
thur Foley, Broker/owners 
of Century 21 Annex Real- 
ty, Inc. in Quincy, announce 
Charles Pages has joined the 
company. 

Pages has been a real es- 
tate agent for 17 years. He 
has also worked more than 
15 years as a mortgage loan 
originator. 

Pages has experience 
selling and financing resi- 
dential real estate in the 
Greater Boston market. He 
also has an in-depth knowl- 
edge of construction prac- 
tices and costs. He grew up 
in a family who worked in 
all types of construction. 

Pages went to school at 




CHARLES PAGES 

the University of Wisconsin 
in Economics. 

He lives in Rockland 
with his wife. 

Pages is bilingual and 
he can speak English and 
French. 



Earn Tax Credits For Your Green Home Improvements 



(NU) - Consumers mak- 
ing substantial home reno- 
vations can receive a tidy 
tax credit from Uncle Sam if 
they shop and buy carefully. 

The American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 allows home owners 
to receive tax credits when 
they improve the energy ef- 
ficiency of their home. 

Tax credits are different 
from tax deductions. A tax 
credit is figured after you 
determine your tax bracket 
and how much you should 
owe in taxes. A tax deduc- 
tion reduces how much you 
owe in taxes by decreasing 
your taxable income. The 



amount of a tax credit is the 
same for everyone, while 
tax deductions are not. 

To receive the tax credits, 
homeowners should make 
sure their improvements ad- 
here to the IRS guidelines: 

1. Must be "placed in 
service" from Jan. 1, 2009 
through Dec. 31,2010. 

2. Must be for taxpayer's 
principal residence, except 
for geothermal heat pumps, 
solar water heaters, solar 
panels, and small wind en- 
ergy systems (where second 
homes and rentals qualify.) 

3. $1,500 is the maxi- 
mum total amount that can 
be claimed for all products 



REALTY 7 

371 BUUngs Rd., Quincy 02170 
617-472-7700 




Working for you 
7 days a week 




Tom McMahon 



realty7.biz 
toin@realty7.biz 



placed in service in 2009 
and 2010 for most home im- 
provements, except for geo- 
thermal heat pumps, solar 
water heaters, solar panels, 
fuel cells, and small wind 
energy systems, which are 
not subject to this cap, and 
are in effect through 2016. 

4. Must have a "Manu- 
facturer Certification State- 
ment" to qualify. 

5. For record keeping, 
save your receipts and the 
Manufacturer Certification 
Statement. 

6. Improvements made 
in 2009 will be claimed on 
your 2009 taxes (filed by 
April 15, 2010) - use IRS 
Tax Form 5695 (2009 ver- 
sion) - it will be available 



late this year or early 2010. 

An example of a product 
that can certify purchasers 
for a tax credit up to $ 1 ^(X) 
is the Comfortex Comfor- 
Track Plus Energy Saving 
Sidetrack Insulation Sys- 
tem. The window insulation 
system, which consists of a 
double honey-comb cellular 
.shade and removable side- 
tracks, helps homeowners 
save money and energy. The 
sidetracks completely close 
the gap between the window 
and its shade, preventing 
heat loss in the winter and 
solar heat gain in the sum- 
mer. 

To leam more about the 
tax credit, visit www.irs.gov 
or talk to a talk advisor. 




THIS 
ISA 



By Samantha Mazzotta 

Troubleshooting something else is prevent- 

Faulty Porch Light 

I have an out- 



ing current from reaching 
the fixture. If there is cur- 
rent, the fixture may be 



\J^ • door light just faulty. Swap it out at the 
above my back entrance home-improvement store 
that for a long time had a for a new one . 



broken socket. TVo weeks 
ago I completely replaced 
the fixture with a nice 
brass and glass one from 
the home-improvement 



Another possibility is 
the wall switch. Before 
you head back to the store, 
make sure that current is 
getting to the switch by 



QUINCY 



store. The light came on testing with a voltage tester 

fine at first, but the next or multimeter. 
day it didn't work. I re- Look for any electri- 

placed the bulb, checked cal damage to the switch 

the wires to make sure or fixture. Are there black 

they're hooked up, but no smudge marks on the 

dice. Any ideas? - Jack switch cover or fixture 



M^rwv^. 



stamosandstamosrealtors 



FLAVIN 



Insurance 
Agency 



Stamos & Stanios Realtors 

"4" Kast Suantiim Si. 
Squantum, MA ()21~1 ^ 

61 ".328.0 4()() 



.com 



Complete Insurance Service Since 1925 

AUTO • HOME * CONDO 

BUSINESS ♦ FLOOD 

UMBRELLA • APARTMENTS 

OfTering New Lower Auto Rates 

Discounts for Auto and Homeowners 

CalJ for Premium Quote 



Miixin tV M;i\in 



617-479-1000 



Realty Pros ^^ 

Buying, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY -(617): 

On the Web visit McFarlan 


m 


m^. 


)28-3200 

dproperties.com 



M., Buffalo, N.Y. 

A ^ First, start with 
• the obvious ~ 
check the fuse box to make 
sure the circuit is closed. If 
the circuit is broken, or if 
after you close it the circuit 
breaks again, some electri- 
cal fault is occurring. 
Next, check to make 



plate? Any frayed or dam- 
aged wires visible? 

If everything seems 
OK, check switches and 
receptacles along the entire 
circuit for any visible dam- 
age. 

HOME TIP: Trying to 
make sure a circuit is on or 
off but don't have a helper? 



sure the wiring is hooked piug a portable radio into a 
up properly, with the receptacle along the cir- 



grounding wire in place 
and all connections nice 
and snug. 

Check the wires with a 
voltage tester or multim- 
eter to ensure that current 
is running through them. 
If there is no current ~ 
and the circuit is closed ~ 



cuit and crank the volume, 
so you can hear when it 
switchesoff or on. 

Send questions or home-repair 
tips to home guru2000@ Hotmail, 
com, or write This Is a Hammer, 
do King Features Weekly Ser- 
vice. P.O. Box 536475, Orlando. 
FL 32853-6475. 

© 2009 King Features Synd.lnc. 



Thursday, July 2, 2009 TT&e Qi;Lincy Sun Page 21 



■MMMMMif I ' „„^.-^JJ^,,-,,.^,. ,.. .^ ^ .^ 





o<xxx>o<x><xx><xx<xx 



Sun Sports 




'y>o^yyy>c<y>ooooo<><yy>o^>o<>o^y>oo'y^o^yyyy^^ 



QUINCY U16 TRAVEL SOCCER: Front row from left: Kay la Thymen, Tara Sullivan, Emily 
Sullivan, Sara Gardiner, Shannon Coleman, Maggie Lynch, Jillian Carchedi, Courtney Byrne, 
Shannon Buckley and Winnie Akory. Back row: Head Coach Bob Keezer, Gina Maurano, 
Mackenzie Irvin, Kaleen Campo, Sara Gilbert, Jillian Keezer, Sara Sullivan, Courtney Tim- 
mons and assistant coach Larry Carchedi. 

Quincy Sun photo/Larry Carchedi 

Season Ends With 3-1 Loss To North Andover 

QYS Under- 16 Travel Team 
Takes Third-Place At MTOC 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

The Quincy Youth Soc- 
cer Under- 16 Girls Travel 
team made their presence 
felt on the state soccer 
scene this past weekend at 
the annual Massachusetts 
Tournament of Champions 
(MTOC) held in Lancaster; 
a state soccer tournament 
that is comprised of ten 
league champions^^and two 
wild card teams from all 
around Massachusetts. 

The 17-member team 
finished in third-place in the 
12-team tourney, losing in 
the semifinals, 3-1 , to even- 
tual state champion North 
Andover. Quincy advanced 
to the final four round by 
capturing first-place in its 
MTOC division. Before 
the final four round, the 12 
teams made up three four- 
team divisions and played in 
a round robin format, with 
the three division champs 
and one wild card team ad- 
vancing. 

Quincy earned its ticket 
to the semifinals by going 
1-1-1 in its division, which 
also included U16 teams 
from Springfield (a 3-1 
win), Wilmington (a 0-0 
tie) and Barnstable (a 2-1 
loss). Quincy advanced on 
tiebreakers. 

In the semifinals, the 
team actually held a 1-0 
lead through the first 52 
minutes of an 80-minute 
game, but North Andover, 
which hadn't allowed a 
goal against all tournament 
stormed back to win by 
two goals. Still, with over 
100 teams throughout the 
state (playing in 14 sepa- 
rate leagues) competing 
for the state championship 
throughout the spring, Quin- 
cy's third-place finish was a 
great accomplishment. 

The MTOC consists of 
travel teams from leagues 
including BAYS (Boston 
Area Youth Soccer), Berk- 
shire, Coastal Youth Soc- 
cer League, Essex County 



Youth Soccer Association, 
Midland Area Youth Soc- 
cer, Middlesex Youth Soc- 
cer League, Nashoba Valley 
Youth Soccer League, Pio- 
neer Valley Junior Soccer 
League, South Coast Soccer 
League and the South Shore 
Youth Soccer League. 

"This was the best group 
of girls 1 have ever coached 
in my many years coach- 
ing in Quincy Youth Soc- 
cer," said longtime head 
coach Bob Keezer about 
his 2009 team. "They have 
been together preparing for 
this season since back in 
January and when the sea- 
son started back in April 
they just played so well all 
season in the South Shore 
League. 

"We started the year by 
losing our first two games, 
but didn't lose the rest of 
the year and even ended the 
season with three consecu- 
tive shutouts." 

Quincy, which does 
play in the eight-team 
South Shore League (SSL) 
against teams from Eas- 
ton, Holbrook-Avon, Wey- 
mouth, Whitman, Braintree, 
Bridgewater and Brockton, 
qualified for the MTOC by 
earning a wild card invite 
after finishing as the final- 
ist in the SSL playoffs two 
weekends ago in Bridgewa- 
ter. Quincy finished the SSL 
playoffs by defeating Hol- 
brook-Avon, 5-2 in over- 
time, and losing to Easton, 
4-2. 

"Congratulations to Bob 
Keezer who has been a coach 
in Quincy Youth Soccer for 
over 16 years," said assis- 
tant coach Larry Carchedi. 
"He is a very committed 
parent and coach who has 
always been around to man- 
age and coach these players. 
Both the players and coach- 
es had a great time and rep- 
resented Quincy well over 
the weekend. Last year the 
team finished in the bottom 
of the league; this year's 



team is the #3 team in the 
state. Needless to say, quite 
an accomplishment."' 

Coach Keezer was quick 
to recognize the importance 
of QYS and the efforts put in 
by everyone involved with 
the league and the team. 

"1 want to compliment 
Quincy Youth Soccer for 
their absolute support and 
efforts for youth soccer pro- 
grams in Quincy," he stated. 
"The league officials did a 
great job and displayed ex- 
treme professionalism that 
all other leagues in the state 
should follow. 

"A special thanks to 
Dana Santilli, the vice-pres- 
ident of travel for QYS, for 
his extraordinary support of 
all the teams in the league." 

Carchedi also recognized 
the work done by Mr. San- 
tilli over the years as a vital 
member of the South Shore 
League. 

"Dana should also re- 
ceive recognition as VP 
of travel for QYS. He has 
worked very hard to support 
the youth players in Quincy 
for travel soccer. He is also 
on the SSL board and puts 
in endless hours and should 
be recognized for his com- 
mitment to travel soccer and 
all of his efforts. Having a 
Quincy team get to the state 
tournament is an accom- 
plishment for the players 
as well as Dana, who was 
like a proud father over the 
weekend with the Under- 
16's in the tournament." 

The 2009 U16 Quincy 
team roster includes the fol- 
lowing players: Kayla Thy- 
men, Tara Sullivan, Em- 
ily Sullivan, Sara Gardiner, 
Shannon Coleman, Maggie 
Lynch, Jillian Carchedi. 
Courtney Byrne, Shannon 
Buckley, Winnie Akory, 
Gina Maurano, Mackenzie 
Irvin, Kaleen Campo, Sara 
Gilbert, Jillian Keezer, Sara 
Sullivan and Courtney Tim- 
mons. 



Three-Win Week; Record Stands At 8-4 

Morrisette Defeats 
Holbrook & Hyde Park 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

Morrisette Legion fin 
ished last week with a 
perfect 3-0 record. The 
week started with a con- 
vincing 11-4 victory over 
Holbrook Legion, and the 
team followed that victory 
with consecutive wins over 
Hyde Park Legion (an 1 1-3 
thrashing and a victory by 
forfeit). 

As of press time, Mor- 
risette was sitting pretty in 
the District 6 East Ameri- 
can Legion standings with 
an 8-4 overall record (16 
total points), two points 
behind division leader Ja- 
maica Plain Legion. 

"We are playing good 
hall at the moment."' said 
Morrisette"s Bill Marchand. 
"The whole lineup, from 
top-to-bottom, is hitting and 
our pitching and defense 
have been real solid. 

"We have ten games left 
in our schedule, but with 
the bad weather, some of 
our games this week may 
have to be rescheduled. 
But with 16 points so far. 
our chances of making the 
playoffs look good." 

The team was set to play 
the second of two games 
against Hyde Park this week 
on Saturday but the opposi- 
tion did not have enough 
players to field a team. As a 
result, Morrisette earned its 
easiest win of the season. 

"They only had six play- 
ers show up and as a result, 
we won by forfeit," added 
Marchand. "It would have 
been nice to play the game 
because we are starting to 
really heat up at the plate, 
but we will take any victory 
we can get at this point." 

Maybe Hyde Park just 
wanted to avoid a similar 
fate as the one that was 



given to them on I riday 
evening. 

Behind the stellar pitch- 
ing of Kevin Magoon (six 
innings. five hits, five strike- 
outs, two earned runs) and 
Jimmy Vialpando (one hit. 
two strikeouts), .Morrisette 
beat Hyde Park 11-3. 

The team jumped out to 
the early lead on Friday w ith 
a big first inning. Leadoff 
hitter Danny Russell hom- 
ered to get the scoring rally 
started and he was followed 
by a bevy of productive at- 
bats. Colin Ryan reached 
after being hit by a pitch; 
John Ainslev walked; .Matt 
Rodrique/. hit a RBI single 
(scoring Rvan); R\an Louis 
doubled home .Ainslcv and 
Alex rrageilis doubled 
home Rodriquez. .After an 
inning of play. .Morrisette 
led 4-0. 

In the second inning, 
Russell singled and scored 
on a RBI hit from Ro- 
driquez. 

Morrisette would score 
again in the fourth inning 
following a single and sto- 
len base from Greg Nelson 
and another RBI base hit 
from Rodriquez and again 
in the fifth inning after Lou- 
is doubled and scored on a 
base hit from Nelson. 

In the sixth inning. Mor- 
risette scored three more 
times. Rodriquez had a RBI 
hit and Salvucci had a tuo- 
run homer. 

"We kept the line mov- 
ing against Hyde Park and 
that first inning really set 
the tone for the game." said 
Marchand. "When we have 
our lineup from top to bot- 
tom hitting on all cylinders 
we can be tough to beat." 

Earlier in the week Mor- 
risette knocked off Hol- 
brook Legion by a score of 



1 1 -4. R\an Louis picked up 
his fourth win on the hill b\ 
throwing five innings, al- 
lowing five hits, three walks 
and striking out six batters. 
Joe Ldgerly allowed four 
hits and three runs in relief. 

In the first inning. Ryan 
walked: Ainsley singled: 
Rodriquez walked and 
Ricky Salvucci drove in 
Ryan with a RBI single 
The team continued to pour 
It on offensively in the third. 
Rodriquez tripled: Salvucci 
drove him in with a RBI 
single, stole second and 
advanced to third base on 
a passed ball: Louis walked 
and stole second (Salvucci 
scored on a delated steal of 
home I : Ben Leah> reached 
on an error and Nelson 
drove in Louis with a RBI 
hit. 

.Morrisette would score 
twice more in the fourth 
and three more times in the 
seventh, including Salvucci 
knocking in his fifth run of 
the game. 

"Ricky is killing the ball 
right now," said Marchand. 
"With him and Matty Ro- 
driquez and R\an Louis hit- 
ting they wa\ the\ are we 
are scoring runs at a good 
pace. If the top of the lineup 
continues to get on base we 
feel good about these three 
driving them in. It was an- 
other good week for the 
team."" 

Notes: Rick\ Salvucci 
leads the team with 21 RBI 
and Matt Rodriquez has 
13 RBI... Morrisette and 
Quincy Legion were sched- 
uled to pla> at .Adams Field 
Wednesday night... Quinc) 
Legion defeated Weymouth 
9-8 in extra innings last 
week...Quinc\ Legion's 
overall record stands at 
3-8. 



QEN Presents Taddle for 
the Environment' July 11 



The Quincy Environ- 
mental Network (QEN) 
will present "Paddle for 
the Environment," an after- 
noon of boating activities 
and family fun. on Satur- 
day, July II from 12 noon 
to 4:30 p.m. at the Recre- 
ation Boathouse on Black's 
Creek behind Pageant 
Field. 

The rain date for this 
event is scheduled for Sat- 
urday, July 18 from 9 a.m. 
to 1:30 p.m. 

Some of the highlights 
of the day's events include 
excifing canoe and kayak 



relay races for boaters tif 
all experience levels: kids" 
activities including the 
New England Touch Tank, 
a bubble station and more: 
free guided walking tours 
of Merrymount Park and 
canoe and kayak tours of 
Black's Creek: and a cook- 
out (race participants will 
enjoy a free lunch). 

The Quincy Police De- 
partment and the Quincy 
Recreation Department will 
also be present to provide 
facilities and safety patrol 
Food and refreshments will 
be for sale but all other ac- 



tiMties will be free 

Team Entry (>uidelines 
and Fees: 

Canoe Long Course: 
team of six people. Si 20 
team donation. 

Canoe Short Course: 
team of four people, $80 
team donation 

Kayak Long Course: 
team of three people. $60 
team donation 

Kayak Short Course: 
team of one person. $20 
team donation 

For more information, 
call 617-877-5975 or visit 
www.QENet.org. 



Page 22 Tlie QvdxxcY Siun Thursday, July 2, 2009 



Quincy Babe Ruth-District 
Tournament Results 



The Babe Ruth District Nazzaro (three hits), b. Mc- 
tournaments for the 13-15 Donough (two hits), Sam 
year olds got underway this Lawlor (hit) and Liuzzo (five 
past weekend; the following runs scored) paced the late- 
are the results of the Quincy game offensive attack. 
Babe Ruth participants. Nazzaro, Justin Coscia 



13- Year Olds 

On Saturday, Quincy, 
in an exciting come-from- 
behind victory, defeated Tri- 
Town 9-8. 

Quincy, down by two 



15- Year Olds 



and Tim Stille played well runs in the seventh inning. 



On Saturday, Quincy defensively for Quincy. 



The 15-year old roster 
includes Dan Higgins, Jus- 
tin Coscia, Bob Kozlowski, 
Adam Nazzaro, 2^ch Steams, 
Joe Alibrandi, Sam Lawlor, 
Ed McDonough, Lukas Mc- 

Gustin, 



battled back to tie the game 
and then scored two runs in 
the eighth inning to win the 
game. Ryan Maver and Matt 
Kerin were the offensive 
stars for Quincy and Stephen 
Beaton, John Marsinelli, Joe 
Critelli and Matt Baldwin all 



started distnct play with a 
5-0 win over Hanover. Joe 
Alibrandi pitched a gem. He 
allowed one hit and struck 
out 1 1 batters to earn the win 
on the hill. 

Lukas McDonough (two Donough, Torrey 

hits), Mike Stille (double), James Dunn, Ryan Doherty, played well for Quincy in the 

Sam Lawlor (double), Ed Tim Liuzzo, Andrew Ro- field. 

McDonough (single) and gantino and Mike Stille. The Barnwell threw seven in- 

Dan Higgins (single) led the coaching staff includes Tony nings allowing two hits and 

Quincy offense against Ha- Alibrandi, George Higgins, three walks and Kerin came 

nover. Tim Liuzzo and Ryan Dick Lombardi, Ray Coscia in to close out in the eighth 

Doherty played well defen- and Tom Nazzaro. inning, 
si vely for Quincy. 14- Year Olds On Sunday, Kingston 

On Sunday, Quincy ham- Hingham defeated Quin- topped Quincy 10-3 behind 

mered Hingham 20-8 behind cy 2-1 in a tightly played some strong pitching, 

the combined pitching of game. Matt Kerin, Ryan Maver 

Lukas McDonough and Tim Nick McGaughey (two and Ben Martin all pitched 

Liuzzo. hits). Bill Campbell (hit) and well for Quincy and John 

After falling behind 6-2 Alex Heffeman (RBI) played 
after four innings, Quincy 's well offensively for Quincy. 
bats came alive and the team Alex Loud was outstand- 
outscored Hingham 18-2 ing on the mound, giving up McGonagle, Madison Bam- 
over the last three innings, three hits and striking out well and Mike Camavalle all 
Alibrandi (two double, tri- three batters against a strong played well defensively for 
pie, four runs scored), Adam Hingham lineup. Quincy. 

At Broadmeadows MS and Joy Hanlon Field 

Joy's Sports Programs 

To Begin July 6 




THE DAVIS GROUP: The Davis Group defeated Wilson DeMarini 5-4 to win the Dorothj 
Quincy Girls Softball championship. Bottom row from the left: Brianna Sullivan, Meghar 
Davis, Meghan Greene and Angela McDonald. Second row: Coach Scott McDonald, Madisor 
Davis, Brianna Christiani, Katie McCormack, Alex Scanlan, Samantha Caldwell, Danielle Ma 
loney, Angela McDonald and Coach Jay Davis. Top row: Coach Kip Caldwell, Liz Bell, Eileer 
Devane, Hanna Donovan and Coach Fran Donovan. Not pictured: Pramilla Murray and Coacl 
Christine Sullivan. 

Davis Group Wins Dorothy 
Quincy Softball Title 



The 
Wilson 



Davis Group and 
DeMarini played 



Marsinelli and Matt Merin 
starred on offense. 
Brian Fisher, 



Conor 



motto has always been to take a 4-2 lead. 

have fun." Eileen Devane, Katie 

an extra inning affair in the The title game went into McCormack and Mary Katt 

championship game of the extra innings after Wilson Kilcommons each scored i 

Dorothy Quincy Softball DeMarini's Camille Mul- run for DG and Liz Bell anc 

Division (ages 9-12) recent- laney hit a two-out homerun Alex Scanlon had big hit; 

ly at Mitchell-McCoy Field; to tie the game in the bot- to lead the offensive attack 

the Davis Group won 5-4 as torn of the sixth inning after 

Brianna Christiani scored her teammate Katy Meehan 

the winning-run. scored a run earlier in the 

"Both teams played an frame. Molly Minton, Amy 

incredible two games," DG Tompson and Coleen Le- 

coach Jay Davis said after then all played well defen- 

winning the championship si vely for DeMarini. 

game of the double-elimi- Hannah Donovan 

nation tournament. "Each pitched a complete game 

game had great defense, and knocked in two runs for 

timely hitting and strong the Davis Group and An- 



Brianna Sullivan, Madisor 
Davis, Pramila Murray anc 
Hannah Donovan all playec 
well defensively for DG. 

Danielle Parry, Lucij 
Buzzell, Kiera Clifford 
Kelsey Dunn, Rhiannor 
Livingstone, Jillian Hal 
lisey, Lindsey North anc 
Kaitlyn Hart all played wel 
for Wilson DeMarini. Briar 



pitching. It is a tribute to the gela McDonald, Samantha Meehan and Bob Thompsor 



Joy's Sports Programs 
will hold basketball and 
soccer clinics, for boys and 
girls ages 6-14, beginning 
Monday, July 6 through Au- 
gust 8. 



The basketball clinic, 
which will be held at Broad- 
meadows Middle School, 
and the soccer clinic, to be 
held at Joy Hanlon Field in 
Quincy Point, will both be 



held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Cost is $105 per week and 
discounts are available. 

For additional informa- 
tion, call Rich Hanlon, Di- 
rector, at 617-827-8697. 



players that each game came 
down to the final batter. 

"The Davis Group is 
made up of 16 wonderful 
kids, who all contributed 



Caldwell and Nina McDon- 
ald had multiple hits to the 
lead the offense. Danielle 
Maloney, Meghan Davis 
and Meghan Greene pro- 



coached Wilson DeMarini. 
The Davis Group road tc 
the championship includec 
wins over Fitness Unlimited 
the McFarland Club, Tiffa 



throughout the season. We vided defensive support for ny Williams and Keohane's 
played as a team and our 



Quincy Youth Baseball/Softball and Frozen Ropes 

Summer 2009 Baseball & Softball 

Clinic Schedule 

Quincy Youth Baseball/Softball is pleased to announce that we have teamed up with 

Frozen Ropes this summer to offer a week long baseball clinic and a week long 

Softball clinic. Best of all. ..a portion of the clinic proceeds will directly benefit 

Quincy Youth Baseball/Softball League! 

Baseball Clinic 

Quarry Hills Little League Complex 

(players ages 5-12) 

July 27th. - July 31st. 9 am - 12 noon 



Softball Clinic 

McCoy/Mitchell field 

(players ages 7-12) 

August 3rd. - August 7th. 9 am - 12 noon 



Cost is $160.00 per week. 
Limited time Online Early Bird Special, register online and save $25.00. 



♦ Full-time professional instruction 

♦ Nationally recognized hitting/fielding drills 

♦ Controlled scrimmages to improve game skill 



♦ Low student/instmctor ratio 

♦ Free T-shirt 



Frozen Ropes 

340 Oak Street, Pembroke, MA 02359 

781-826-2234 or 508-830-1404 

www.frozenropes.com/pembroke 

'The Cutting Edge in Baseball and Softball Training'' 




Donovan. In addition to the players 

In the semifinal game, on the team. Coach Davif 

the Davis Group's Angela credited his team's success 

McDonald pitched out of a to the support of the play 

bases-loaded jam in the bot- ers' families and the work ol 



torn of the sixth inning to 
preserve a 4-3 win for DG 
over Wilson DeMarini. The 
Davis Group scored three 
runs in the fourth inning to 



assistant coaches Scott Mc 
Donald, Fran Donovan, Kip 
Caldwell, Joe Maloney anc 
Christine Sullivan. 



7* James P. Kenney III 
Fishing Derby July 10-11 



The T"" Annual James P. 
Kenney III Fishing Derby 
is scheduled to commence 
Friday evening, July 10 
at 6 p.m. and conclude at 



will go to the James P. Ken- 
ney III Trust Fund. A cook- 
out will be held at noon on 
July 11. 

The Kenney family began 



noontime the following day, running this annual fishing 
Saturday, July 1 1 from the tournament six years ago in 



Quincy Yacht Club. 

The event is in benefit 
of the James P. Kenney III 
Trust Fund, a fund that ben- 



Jim Kenney 's name to fund 
a scholarship for local stu- 
dents pursing maritime or 
environmental studies. Ken- 



efits Quincy residents at both ney worked on the ocean the 



high schools and at the col- 
lege level. Eligible students 
will be pursuing degrees in 
maritime or environmental 
studies. 

The fish caught during 



majority of his life and was 
an avid fisherman and over- 
all boat enthusiast. Over the 
years, the family has raised 
enough money to provide at 
least two students with size- 



the derby will be measured able scholarships to help al- 

by noontime on July 1 1 and leviate the cost of increasing 

prizes will be awarded for tuition, 
the three longest stripped For more information 

bass. In addition to the priz- about the derby, contact Dan 

es, a raffle will be drawn Kenney at 617-786-9067. 
where half of the proceeds 



Thursday, J uly 2, 2009 The Quincy Siua Page 23 



780 Students on NQHS 3rd Quarter Honor Roll 



North Quincy High Schtx)! 
lists 780 students on its third 
quarter honor roll. 

They are: 

Distinction 

Grade 12 

Scott Anderson, Eric Aron- 
son, Joseph Benoit, Emma 
Bonoli, Kyle Bricxiy, Ste- 
ven Cai, Monica Chan, Dan 
Chen, Winnie Chen, Kayla 
Chou, Stacey Chung, Megan 
Croake, Jessica Davis, Tina 
Dicarii, Sara Djerf, Jenny 
Do, Kerry Donaghey. Ellen 
Einsidler, Jane Esterquest. 
Frank Flora, Brittany Fol- 
kins, Feng Fenny Gao, Kelly 
Gardiner, Michel Gardiner, 
Vjosa Grillo, Dayna Guest, 
Jessica Howlett, Christopher 
Jo, Vishal Kapadnis, Shannon 
Keady, Daniel Keeley. 

Frederick Li , Chi -Ho I iem , 
Fang Lin, Tak Wai Lo, Anna 
Lu, Ricky Lu, Julie Lynch. 
Lily Man, Nicole Mann, Ste- 
phen Markarian, Jacqueline 
McAllister, Catherine McA- 
loon, Jenna McAuliffe, Jason 
Mei, Sara Morris, Brenna 
Morrissey, Melissa Mullaney, 
Julie Ni, Jillian O'Brien, Kev- 
in Pacheco, Emily Page, Don- 
ald Pound. Alysandra Quinn. 
Basem Sadaka. Kirsten Shel- 
ter. Christine Sorensen, Rob- 
ert Stetson, Jugera Sulejmani, 
Edmund Tang, May Tin, 
Richard Tsan, Carmen Tsang, 
Jamie Tse, Joseph Vialpando, 
Stanley Wong , Victoria Wong , 
Yao Sing Wong, Jillian Wor- 
ley, Jennifer Wu, Kathy Wu, 
Monica Yao, Lai Ying Yeung, 
Zong Yu, Elisa Yung, Em- 
ily Zarnoch, Richard Zhang, 
Guang Lin David Zheng and 
lie Zheng. 

Grade 11 

Carolyn Ainsley, Jessica 
Ainsley, James Barresi, Ida 
Bixho, Adam Cai, Giyan 
Chan, Henry Chan, Wanda 
Chan, Colin Chen, Diane 
Chen, Witney Chen, Diana 
Chen, William Chin, Cody 
Cot, Silas Debus, Dana Djerf. 
Lien Do, Christina Feeney, 
Kathleen Flaherty, Joshua 
Francois, Michael Ghossoub, 
Edward Gould. Bonita Huang. 
Thuy Anh Huynh, Bryan Jack- 
son, Matthew Jayne, Sophina 
Ji, April Kwong. Jenifer La, 
Samantha Lau. Linda Le. 
Drew Leahy, Rowena Leung, 
Justin Li, Amy Lo, Samantha 
Logue, Heather L(xiby, Hui 
Ling Lu, Steven Ly. 

Gregory McDouglas, Al- 
exandra Meighan.Adam Mo- 
reschi, Vicky Nguyen, Roshni 
Patel, Andy Quach, Sara Quil- 
lin, Timothy Riordan, Marisa 
Saraci , Mary Schwartz, Mabel 
Setow, Brianna Shelter, Carrie 
Sunde, Samantha To, Christine 
Tran, Tea Trebicka, Wing Na 
Tsoi, Oanh Vu, Haley Wong, 
Amy Worth, Clara Yee, Shiqi 
Zheng and Chen Zou. 

Grade 10 

Jade Arsenault, Tsz Ling 
Au, Robert Bennett, Jaclyn 
Bryson, Lisa Chan, Bin 
Chen, Joanne Ching, Ho 
Yeung Cot, Jacqueline Cun- 
niff, Danielle Denien, Jamie 
Diu, Brendan Dodd, Ahmed 
Yasser El Hamoumi, Teresa 
Fong, Sarah Gardiner, Mon- 
ika Gimius, Daniel Green, 
John Green, Joseph Grennon, 
Maggie He, Tony Huang, Eric 
Huynh, Francesca Huynh, 
Scott Knight, Bridget Kosil- 
la, Brenda Lam, Peter Lam, 
Mark Lee, Jennifer Li, Linda 
Li, Wei Liang. Lin Lin, Kevin 
liu, My Thanh Luc, Amy Ly, 



Christina Ly, Judy Ly, NgcK 
Ly. 

Montana McBirney, Ten 
ley McKee, Jason Ng, Trami 
Nguyen, Zhi Mei Pan, Mi 
chael Pizziferri, Kelsey Pow- 
ers, Leanna Santos, Ossama 
Senhaj, JiaBao Shang, Jia 
Qian Shi. Amy Tarrant, Chris- 
topher To, Alexandra Tran, 
Brenda Iran, Heidi Van, Mi 
chelle Walsh, Pei Ting Wang, 
Wei Wang. Yingqi Wang. Tina 
Weng, Doris Wong, Hillary 
Wong, Meng Yun Wu and Yi 
Xuan Yao. 
(;rade 9 

Omar Abo-Sido, Abrar 
Ahmed, Neil Adrian Banoey. 
Aris Bega, Kelsey Bina. Nam 
Bui. Anna Canavan, Andrea 
Chan. Jerry Chan. Michael 
Chan. Andy Chen. Anthony 
Chen, Bonnie Chen, Henry 
Chen. Jonathan Chin, Melanie 
Chin. Debby Chiu. Stephanie 
Cho. Tim Dang, Samantha 
Enbar-Salo. Ryan Evans. Jia 
Min Gao. Shirley Gao. Aman- 
da Granahan. Jennifer Grif- 
fith. Kenton Guan. Samantha 
Guan. Mark Hanna. Bond 
Ho, Gui Ming Huang. Kevin 
Huang. Michelle Huang. Tam- 
my Huang. Xiu Wen Wendy 
Huang. Christopher Hui. 

Tony Kwang. Jeffrey Law. 
Megan Leahy, Emily Lee. 
Maria Lei Zhang. Sean Lerk- 
vikarn. Edward Leung. Kelly 
Lew. Cai King Li. Hidy Li. 
Jeanie Li, Peter Lieu. Xing 
Jun Lin, Ji Tong Liu. Sandy 
Liu. William Lunny. Crystal 
Luo. Cindy Luu. Nguyet Ly. 
Mary McGough. Wei Ming 
Steven Mei. Ryann Melendy. 
Brendan Moreira, Christina 
Ng, Juliana Ng, Bao Tran 
Nguyen, Cindy Nguyen. 
Rene Norton, Shuyi Peng, 
Minh Pham. Cynthia Quach, 
Junx Tan, Michelle Tan. Bao 
Yi Tang, Hoi Chun Tong, 
Duyen Tran. Jose Vasquez. 
Yufeng Wang. Grace Wong, 
lok Teng Wong. Kevin Yong. 
Karen Yu. William Yu, Philip 
Zeng and Risheng Zeng. 
Hi gh Honors 
Grade 12 

Nora Canavan, David 
Chan. Frank Chan. Ka Man 
Chan. Alejandra Cri stales. 
Maureen Deady. Marisa For- 
rester, Ka Ling Hin. Matthew 
Jay. Amy Kelly, Ashley Ko- 
stka. Andrew Lam. Nicholas 
Lawless. Peter Lawlor, Ben- 
jamin Leahy, Dennis Leung. 
Jennifer Leung, Tracy Li, 
Dennis Lo, Kathleen Lynch. 
Matthew Manning, Brenna 
McGoff. Philip Mei, Jessica 
Moran, Tran Pham, Jason 
Power, Stanley Tarn, Keith 
Tarrant, Daniel Tsai, Sofjola 
Voskopoja, Bonnie Wong, 
Philip Wong, Cindy Wu, Zhuo 
Qiang Wu, Simon Yeung and 
Mu Zhu. 
Grade 11 

John Ainsley, Samantha 
Bonanni, Dan Ying Che, Alex 
Chen, Geoffrey Chen, Kwok 
Chung Chong, Jerry Chung, 
Carly Colantonio, Evan De- 
twiler, Oscar Diep, Martin 
Dunham, Anna Duong, Timo- 
thy Fitzgerald, Evan Fitzmau- 
rice, Michaela Flaherty, Han- 
nah Flattery, Lisa Gustavsen, 
Cindy Ho, Mariana Huang, 
Julie Huynh, Shantelle John- 
son, Jacquelene Kelley, Jes- 
sica Ketner, Brian Le, Tina 
Lei, Biao Li, Qian Jun Liang, 
Lawrence Liuzzo, Ying Tung 
Loo, Michael Medeiros, Hen- 
ry Nguyen, Leonidha Pulluqi, 
Alan Qiu, Alessandra Quillin, 



Dylan Rixrhe, Hong Xuan To, 
Samantha Iwitchell, Angela 
Wong. Christine Wong. Yi Kit 
Wong, and Victor Wu. 

Grade 10 

Tara alien. Gabriel Baysa. 
Ashley Bergonzi. Justin Cal- 
lahan. Ni Cao. Kevin Car- 
ney. Jr.. Shirley Chan, Emily 
Chapman. Kelly Chau. Jun 
Chen. Sharon Cheng. Wyn- 
nona Nicole Enano, Karan 
Eunni, Connor Flynn. Chris 
tina Gambon. Krisi Gjini, 
Kamilah Gonzales. Emily 
Gray. Albert Ha Le. Manani 
Hamada. William Ho, Flora 
Hu, Syndey Huynh. Kelsey 
Kelley, Kevin Liao. Anne liu. 
Jerry Liu. Justine Lomanno. 
Madeline McDonough. Shel- 
by Merchant. Thomas Nigl, 
Benjamin O'Brien. Victoria 
Phan. Nicole Regal, Shelby 
Rink, Julie Ross. Deanna 
Soricelli . You Da Tan, Shirley 
Van. Daniel Whcwley. Colin 
Wilson. Henry Wong, Jay 
Ming Wong. Karen Wong. 
Winnie Yu and 1 inson Zhu. 

Grade 9 

Emma Ainsley. Melissa 
Bouzan. Christina Chau. 
Rachel Chu. Randy Dennis. 
Christina Do. Samuel Doo- 
dy. Elizabeth Forde, Kristen 
Fung. Ilirjana Glozheni. Dan- 
ica Hahn-Anderson. Henry 
Hu. Jesse Huang. Richard 
Hui. Danielle Lapierre. Kath- 
ryn Leone. Benjamin Li. 
Rosemary Lo. Wilson Ly. Mi- 
chael Maranian. Patrick Mc- 
Combs. Richard McDonough. 
Amanda McEvilly. Gerald 
McNeil. Emily Mei. Shu Mei. 
Devin Melendy. Minh Nguy- 
en, Heidi Ochoa. Bridget 
O'Connor. Brielyn O'Leary. 
Kelly O'Neill. Sanjana Pan- 
nem. Brandon Robbs. Erica 
Setow, Elizabeth Spellberg, 
Jourdan Stivaletta. Elizabeth 
Sullivan. Adam Szeto. John 
Kai Yun Tarn. Kevin Tang. 
Courtney Timmins, Huy 
Due To, Thuy Huong Emily 
Truong. Ling Fei Wang. Re- 
gina Wu and Derek Yu. 

Grade 12 

Thomas Arnott. Kelsey 
Bannon. Alyssa Beach. Jillian 
Berry. Meaghan Bowe. Kasey 
Brown. Natalie Cay. Matthew 
Chan. Wilson Chen. Jessica 
Kustka, Caitlyn Labelie. Pat 
Lau. Jennifer Lee. Annie 
Li. Long Huang Lin. Paula 
Luong. Rebecca McBurnie. 
Brian McLean. Michael Mur- 
phy, Andy Ng. Jimmy Nguy- 
en, Shante Nixon. Catherine 
O'Connell, Skye Brittaney 
Ortiz, Parth Parikh. Michael 
Prioli, Shane Regan. Lind- 
say Reilly. Nicole Reppucci. 
Daniel Russell. Richard 
Ryan. Carmen Seto, Caleb 
Silverman, Lamonte Toombs, 
Kevin Tran, Evan Verhault, 
Jason Wong, Gordon Yu, 
Helen Yung, Jeffrey Zhen and 
Andy Zou. 

Grade 11 

Patrick Adduci, Jeffrey 
Alsip, Christopher Anderson, 
Daniel Austin, Jennifer Bar- 
rett, Michael Benoit, Andrew 
Chen, Simon Chen, Raymond 
Cheung, Anita Chung, Vic- 
toria Corbett, Christopher 
Delaney, Maria DiPietro, 
Kayla Dolan, Siobhan Dunn, 
Kristen Durette, Evangeline 
Earl, Michael Gates, Lung 
Giang, Timothy Gillis, Le.ih 
Glennon, Sean Harrington, 
Daniel Ho, Andrea Holcomb. 
Yan Huang. Devin Hudson. 
Kelsey Kenner, Brian Kil- 



cullen, Owen Kilcullen, Cal- 
vin Lam, Matthew Lapierre, 
Devin l^yden. Camille Lee. 
Rachel Lucier. Jonathan Lu- 
ong. 

Lindsey MacPherson. 
Melissa Mah, Jared Martin. 
Courtney McBrien. Sarah 
Minton. Nicole Mirabile. 
Kristen Moreno. Adrian 
Morfe. James Mullaney, Cara 
Murtagh. Tuyet Van Nguyen. 
Brian O'Connell. FLdward 
Oldham, Kristen Peterson. 
Thomas Petitti. Geoffrey 
Quach. Philip Quach, Trevor 
Richardson. Kathleen Sheri- 
dan. Adrian Si. Leah Sorren 
tino. Michael Stanton. Steph 
anie Sweeney. Jonathan Tarn. 
Jun Xiang Tan. Lina Tian. Ja 
clyn Tran, Nhi Tran. Bonnie 
Wong. Jeffrey Yeh. Ai Wen 
Yu and Wilson Zou. 

(;rade 10 

Winifred Akoury. An- 
thony Andronico. Katelyn 
Bergeron. Samuel Bill. Nich- 
olaus Bourgeois. Matthew 
Brean, Shannon Buckley. Eli- 
jah Bun. Peter Campbell. Jil 
lian Carchedi, Can Cay, Jaron 
Chan, Gina Christo. Michael 
Curran. Devin Djerf. Laurie 
Do. Kathryn DohertN. Julie 
Doyle. Linda Duong. Abigail 
Egan. Ping Fung. Nicholas 
Gillespie, Noelle Gobbi. Mi- 
chael Golden. Paul Gould. 
Dereck Graham. Alan Guan. 
Salvatore Gustin. Caroline 
Haskell. Jacqueline Hsia. Ka 
Long lu. Amy Ivy. Alexan- 
dra Keener. Garrett Kelley. 
Jonathan King. Joseph King. 
Matthew Layden. John Le- 
Clair. Franklin Lee. James 
Lee. Andrew I^eone. Kathleen 
Lesslie. Andrea Li. Cai Feng 
Li. Daniel Li. Carmen Liang. 
Edward Liang. Richard Long. 
Gary Lu. Hunag Lu. John Lu- 
ong. Maggie Lynch. 

Eric Mason, Frank Mas- 
trorilli. Kaleigh McKeon. 
Samantha Milano. Maureen 
Mullally. Andrew Nelson. 
Gregory Nelson, Connie Ng, 
Nicole Ng(Kin. Stephanie 
Nguyen. Kathleen Norti>n. 
Max Ohlinger. Josue Or- 
donez. Jennifer Palmer. Lind- 
say Pellegrini. Lee Piatelli. 
Paul Pieper. Ryan Pt>und. 
Kyle Ptak. Susan Quan Man. 
Colin Ryan. Natalie Scuzza- 
rella. Derek Seto. Alexandria 
Shuman. Gregory Smith. Ni- 
colette Soricelli. Victoria Tan. 
Khoa Tran. Steven Tran. Ed- 
die Tsai. Jaclyn Vanvoorhis. 
IJyen Vu. Sulaka Warsame. 
Sonia Weng. David Wong. 
Steven Zawaski. Victor Zhu, 
and Ya Zou . 



Matthew Mclnnis 
Pinewood Derby Winner 




MATTHEW MclNMS of Quinc\, a Tigercub of Pack 
Six, recently won first place in the Great Blue Hill Dis- 
trict Pinewood Derb\ >\hich took place at Larz .Ander- 
son Auto Museum in Brookline. Matthe>^, age 7. was 
the first from Pack .Six to win first place. He recently 
completed the first grade at the .Atherton Hough FJ- 
ementarv School. 



(;rade 9 

Clarissa Aliberti . Ghizlane 
Bandanya. Joshua Bergm. 
Maria Bixho. Kathryn Bra- 
dy. Molly Brennan. Amanda 
Brodeur. Joseph Brown. 
Christine Callahan. Bridget 
Campbell. Kaleen Campo. 
Michael Casinelli. Luan Vmh 
Cay. Marquis Chase. Charles 
Chen. Barry Chiu. Conor 
Clifford. John Clifford. Ma- 
thias Costa. David Daggett. 
Alanna Dean. Nathan Depi- 
na. Joshua Donnelly. Kelsey 
Downey. Kendel Evju. 
Mark Federico. Cynthia Fe- 
liz. Kelly Ferris. Lisa .Mane 
Flora. Elizabeth Folan. Juan 
Carlos Franco. Patrick Gor- 
man. Brittney Guerriero. Em 
ily Haines. Andrew Hallak. 
trie Huang. Jeffrey Hiiane. 
Joanne Huang. Jacqueline 
Hughes. I.m Hunter. Benson 
Huynh. Michaela Jones. Cur 
ran Jorgensen. Gurusripath 
Kadirvel. Seanius Keaveny. 
Emily Kelley. Colleen Kelly, 
Aya Kenawy. Ryan Ketner. 
Brandon K(ni. 

Christopher Lamont. J(v 
seph Lawlor. Wilson Lee. 
Yu Mei Li. Michael Litif. 



("hen Fei Liu. .Angei.i Lugo. 
Andrew .MacPhail. Annie 
Maloney. Devin Maloney. 
Timothy .Marks. Ian> Mar- 
tins. Timothy .McAuliffe. 
.Madison McBime\. Kiley 
McDonald. Matheu Mc- 
Donough. Tayk)r McKay.. Al- 
len Mo. Victor Mc^nterroso. 
.Megan Mornll. Li^rena Mu- 
rati. Julia Murphy. Michael 
.Murphy. Stephanie Ng. Ben 
son .Nguy. Nolan OBrien. 
Samantha O'Connell. Jes- 
sica ODonovan. Valerie 
ODriscoli, James PanNulli>. 
Georgia Papaconstadinou. 
Tara Parekh. Mark Pepin. 
Elaine Phomsou\andara. 
.Anna Qiu. Kara Reardon. 
Kevin Riordan. Bethany 
Routier. .Morgan Rowe. .Sa- 
hrina Santos. Tiinoth) Saun- 
ders. John Schwartz. Ryan 
Shidler. Elizabeth Smith. 
Erin Squarey. Zachary 
Stearns. William Storer. Sara 
Sullivan. .Midoriko lakeuchi. 
Annie Tang. Ryan Timcoe. 
Colin Todd. Olivia Toldness. 
Don Tran. Annie Trang. Andi 
Trebicka. Kimberly Tsang. 
Olivia Linoren. Maneesh 
Vemula and Cathleen \Vant: 



Ki*c|s classes Beginning Seconcl lA/eek of July 

Tuesctaiy July 7tb at 10:503m ages 11 and up 

Wednesday )u ly lOtb at 10:30a m Kids age 6 -10 

8Waksfer^75.00 

Yo^a is a fun way to encourage yotir child's awa'rness ofspirft an4 self-4iscipline wH'le 
cxccHsingthcbo4y,enchancing coordination, focus and balance ttaisohclpstoinci^easese!^- 
confidence and self-csteerr) Yog sis a gi-eat way ^ortidstogettoknowthernselvesfron inside- 

-physicaliy and ernotionaliy 

Adult K^li R^y Tri Yog4 CUssc ^ni Monthly VAbrksfiops 

For rryofc information or to register contact Donna Ch^put C.Y.T. at b'V-S/b 7379 

OK E-mail awa<en ngspifrtyo^a(?^rr)a;!con 

Classes hcis at. First ChtJi'chSqijantL.rT), 164 Scllevt^e Rcac. Qtincy, WK 

vs*w« Kail Kay '^riVoga com 



Page 24 Tl&e Qviincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 2009 




SPOTLK^HT 

on 



HEALTH and FITNESS 





Kids Say Spectacles Are Respectable 



STATE SENATOR Michael Morrissey (right) was awarded 
the Leadership in Healthcare Award by Quincy Medical Cen- 
ter (QMC) for his leadership in the advancement of healthcare 
policy and his commitment to the hospital. QMC President 
and CEO Gary Gibbons, MD, (left), presented the award to 
Morrissey at a recent evening of appreciation for the Quincy 
Medical Center medical staff. In presenting the award. Gib- 
bons thanked Morrissey for his leadership and advocacy on 
behalf of Quincy Medical Center. While accepting the award, 
Morrissey acknowledged the important role QMC plays in the 
community and vowed to continue his support. 

Using Fitness To Launch 
You To Better Success 



(NU) - Your journey 
through life should begin 
with one simple question: 
"What can I achieve with 
better health?" 

Health and fitness can 
impact your life, relation- 
ships and business ventures. 

Physical fitness can in- 
crease mental and emotional 
health, giving you more en- 
ergy and a clearer mind. 

Fitness expert Shawn 
Phillips recommends using 
the following fitness goals 
to launch your personal suc- 
cess: 

• Set goals for the next 90 
days as well as a vision for 
the next year. 

• Don't narrow your 
goals to just fitness, but also 
personal and professional 
goals. That way, you're not 
only getting into shape, but 



also improving your ability 
to excel in life. 

• Establish two quantifi- 
able goals, such as losing lo 
pounds of fat or gaining 10 
pounds of muscle; and two 
mental health goals, like 
improving a relationship or 
pursuing new interests. 

• Find ways to reinvigo- 
rate your mind and body, in- 
cluding eliminating refined 
foods, sugar and empty 
calories from your diet, get- 
ting restful sleep and taking 
up light exercise to help you 
get used to moving. 

"When you are strong, 
healthy and alive with en- 
ergy, you are more effective, 
more confident and more 
in control, Phillips says in 
SUCCESS magazine. "Your 
results in life will improve 
as you do." 



Kids who wear glasses 
used to beeasy targets for 
the classroom bully. 

Today, they are making 
as much of a fashion state- 
ment as an improvement to 
their vision. 

"Only a small percent- 
age of children who have to 
wear glasses are disappoint- 
ed about it," says Dr. Amy 
Walker, an optometrist with 
the University of Wisconsin 
Department of Ophthalmol- 
ogy. "Most children are ac- 
cepting of needing glasses 
because their friends or sib- 
lings wear glasses." 

Walker says that, un- 
like the very large or horn- 
rimmed glasses from de- 
cades ago, today's frame 
styles and thinner lenses 
have made glasses more at- 
tractive for kids, especially 
pre-teens. However, she 
says some children who 
want them may not neces- 
sarily need them. 

"I can tell if they are not 
trying hard enough when 
reading the eye chart," says 
Walker. "At the end of the 
exam, I give them plain 
lenses without a prescrip- 
tion , then have them read the 
eye chart again. Most of the 
time, they are able to read it 
better because they want to 
demonstrate to their parents 
the glasses helped them see 
better." 

In those cases. Walker 
discreetly tells parents not to 
be concerned; their children 
do not need glasses. But she 
says those experiences are 
never a waste of time. 

"I always mention this 



was a good time for an exam 
anyway," she says. "Some- 
times, 1 do pick up some- 
thing that may need atten- 
tion." 

While some kids may be 
eager lo get glasses. Walker 
says parents are less enthu- 
siastic about the idea as well 
as the cost. 

"Some parents will ask, 
'Does my child have to wear 
glasses now? Can't we put 
this off?'" she says. "They 
also control the purse strings, 
so they will choose the price 
range. Yet, 1 always encour- 
age parents to let the child 
have some type of say, be- 
cause they have to like them 
enough to wear them." 

Walker also offers these 
suggestions to parents 
whose children may require 
eyeglasses or contact 
lenses: 

• Go to establishments 
that treat a lot of children 
with eye problems. Usually, 
those places have opticians 
who are properly trained to 
fit glasses for children. 

• Make sure a child's 
eyeglasses are adjusted 
frequently. Walker says 
children's frames are 
typically made of plastic, 
and in time, facial heat 
could make them stretch out 
and not fit properly. 

• Make an appointment 
for an eye exam if a 
pediatrician detects potential 
vision problems. These may 
include strabismus (the 
misalignment of an eye 
so its line of vision is not 
pointed in the same direction 
as the other eye) and muscle 




for the 21st Century 

by Steven A Brustin, D.M.D. 



ANTIBIOTICS BEFORE 

Patients with hip prostheses 
may have heard that it is ad- 
visable to take antibiotics prior 
to undergoing tooth cleaning, 
scaling, and other procedures 
to address the potential release 
of bacteria into the bloodstream 
caused bythese treatments. For 
people with replacement joints, 
the concern is that bacteria in 
the bloodstream ("bacteremia") 
could cause an infection by at- 
taching to the artificial joint or 
surrounding tissues. However, 
such infections are quite rare. 
In fact, the American Dental As- 
sociation recommends against 
the use of antibiotics prior to 
dental procedures with the sole 
intention of preventing infec- 
tions in artificial joints. Excep- 
tions to this recommendation 
involve patients who are very 
susceptible to infection or are 
having a procedure that carries 
a higher risk of bacteremia. 
We are a caring, friendly 



DENTAL PROCEDURES? 

team of dental profession- 
als committed to providing a 
comfortable dental experience. 
This column has been brought 
to you in the interest of better 
dental health. We believe in 
an infomied patient approach 
to achieving optimum dental 
health We're located at 44 
Greenieaf Street, where we 
are dedicated to saving and 
restoring your teeth and help- 
ing you look your best. Call 
617-479-6220 to schedule an 
appointment for superior oral 
health. Beautiful smiles are a 
team effort. We offer the ser- 
vices of anesthesiology with a 
fully trained and qualified anes- 
thesiologist. Visit us on the web 
at www.quincydentist.com. 
PS. Pre-treatment antibiot- 
ics may be indicated for im- 
mune-compromised patients 
and those who have inflamma- 
tory arthritis, type 1 diabetes, or 
hemophilia. 



VOICE 

.r FOR 

f HEALTH 

by Dr. Gabrielle Freedman 

Chiropractor i 





ITCHING TO MAKE A CONNECTION 



Researchers recently 

underscored the major role 
the nervous system plays in 
controlling and conducting body 
functions when they undcrtcxjk to 
study a spinal nerve that transmits 
the "itch'" signal to the brain. 
They found that these nerves, 
which reach the brain from near 
the bottom of the rib cage, can 
differentiate when an itch needs 
to be relieved and when it does 
not. Once this determination 
in the spinal cord is made, the 
relief response to itching from 
scratching is set in motion. 
This study demonstrates how 
conditions seemingly unrelated to 
the brain and spinal column may 
respond to a chiropractor's stated 
goaJ of unblocking transmission 
of nerve signals. Once nerve 
energy flows freely, the body can 
perform as intended. 

Our mission is to give our 
patients and their families the 



truth about health, so they can get 
well and stay well. Talk to your 
diKtor of chiropractic about ways 
to improve your lifestyle. The 
chiropractic approach to health 
care is natural. We can help you 
learn more about your body and 
how to have greater responsibility 
and control over your personal 
health At FAMILY PRACTICE OF 
CHIROPRACTIC, we recommend 
a continuing schedule of regular 
chiropractic checkups, which can 
help detect, correct, and maintain 
ultimate spinal and nervous system 
function. Please call 617.472.4220 
to schedule an appointment and let 
us help you lead a healthier life. 
We're located at 112 McGrath 
Hwy.. Quincy. 

PS. The finding from the 
stud}' mentioned above is in step 
with other research that found that 
specific brain circuits are involved 
in the ability of scratching to stop 
itching 



www.freedmanchiro.coin 



^^ 


i lb Your 

iGood 

iHealth 


by f^ul G. Donohue, M.D, 



palsies, which can cause lenses can correct these 
double vision. Sometimes, problems, 
bifocals or other specialty 



it's OK for you to go on 
living just as you have been, 
if something was wrong, the 
doctor would be obliged to 
tell you so. 

Stress tests are done to de- 
tect coronary artery disease, 
the illness that brings on heart 
attacks. The btxiklet on that 
subject explains what coro- 
nary artery disease is, how it's 
detected and how it's treated. 
Readers can obtain a copy by 
writing: Dr. Donohue - No. 
101 W, Box 536475, Orlando, 
FL 32853-6475. Enclose a 
check or money order (no 
cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Cana- 
da, with the recipient's printed 
name and address. Please al- 
low four weeks for delivery. 

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: 
I was recently diagnosed 
with the swallowing disor- 
der Zenker's diverticulum. 
I am scheduled for surgery. 
Can you discuss it and its 
treatment? I am interested 
in the recovery process be- 
cause I am a teacher and use 
my voice all day. My doc- 
tor has chosen surgery that 
involves going through my 
mouth.- BJJ. 

ANSWER: A Zenker's 
diverticulum is a pouch that 
bulges from the lower part 
of the throat. The pouch can 
cause swallowing problems. 
Food can get caught in it and 
remain there. When it finally 
leaves the pouch, it has a most 
unpleasant cxlor. 

There are many surgi- 
cal procedures to remove the 
pouch and shore up the throat 
tissue. Scopes are used by 
some doctors. Recovery is 
quicker with the scope. Af- 
ter surgery, you will not be 
allowed to eat or drink for a 
day or so, longer for the stan- 
dard operation. The results 
are almost always excellent. 
The voice is not commonly 

affected. 

*** 

Dr. Donohue regrets that he is 
unable to an.swer individual let- 
ters, hut he will incorporate them 
in his column whenever possible. 
Readers may write him or request 
an order form of available health 
newsletters at P.O. Box 536475. 
Orlando. FL 32fi53-6475. 

'<! 2009 North America S> nd., Inc 
All Rights Reserved 



Stress Tests Help 

Detect Heart 

Disease 

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: 
I had an EKG in prepara- 
tion for surgery. The doctor 
said it was abnormal. I was 
sent for a stress test. I could 
not do the physical stress 
test, so I had a chemical one. 
I was told that the results 
were OK. 

No one told me why the 
EKG was abnormal. I am 
very concerned. Is it OK 
just to go on living as I have 
been, or do I need to do 
something? 

I have searched the In- 
ternet for information hut 
can find none. - MD. 

ANSWER: A resting EKG 
is a good test, but it's not the 
ultimate heart test. Things can 
look strange on a resting EKG . 
In order to find out if those 
strange-looking things are 
significant, the next step is to 
do a more sophisticated heart 
test, one that is more sensitive 
in detecting true changes and 
more specific in eliminating 
EKG changes that look odd 
but don't truly represent heart 
disease. 

That's where a stress test 
comes in. During a stress test, 
the person exercises, usually 
on a treadmill. AH during the 
test, an EKG mns. it shows 
changes if the stressed heart 
isn't getting enough blood 
when it has to pump harder. 
You didn't have the treadmill 
variety of a stress test; you 
had one where a drug stressed 
your heart. The end result is 
the same. 

Your stress test must have 
removed the suspicion of 
heart disease that arose from 
the resting EKG. Do you play 
cards? Your stress test trumped 
your resting EKG. 




AT HOME If 

ELDER Care 

Gold star Care for the Golden Years 

Bonded and Insured 
Reliable, Compassionate, Honest, Respectful 

State Certified CNA's & HNA's 
We offer 24/7 care and everything in between 

"There's No Place like Home." 
We Make it Possible to Stay There 

Braintree 781-843-7151 • Milton 617-698-9500 
www.athomeeldercareinc.com 



thursday. July 2, 2009 Tlie Q«&in<!y Stm Page 25 



Fourth Of July Cookout 
At Union Congregational 



The congregation of 
Union Congregational 

Church, 136 Rawson Rd., 
Wollaston, will enjoy a 
cookout on the church lawn 
Sunday following the 10 
a.m. service. 

The public is invited to 
join the church family for 



worship at 10 a.m. and at- 
tend the Fourth of July 
cookout following the wor- 
ship service. 

For more information and 
reservations for Sunday's 
cookout, call the church at 
617-479-6661. 



RELieiCN 

Children's Choir Camp 
At Sacred Heart Parish 



Community United Methodist 



Vacation Bible School At 
Squantum Christian Fellowship 



Squantum Christian Fel- 
lowship announces it will 
hold Vacation Bible School 
July 27-31. 

The theme of this year's 
school is "Croccxlile Dock." 
It will run from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon each day for children 
ages 4-11. 

The school will feature 
crafts, Bible songs, food and 
games. 

Kids will also experience 



a sense of purpose as they 
create fleecy Comfort Crit- 
ters for orphans in India. 
Kids will make one turtle to 
keep and one to give away. 

Parents are welcome to 
arrive before noon so they 
can enjoy the daily Firefly 
Finale with photos of their 
kids in action. 

For more information 
or to register, call 617-328- 
8771. 



Bureau Drawer Thrift 
Shop Sale July 13-17 



The Bureau Drawer 
Thrift Shop will hold a "Hot 
Summer Bag Sale" July 13- 
17 from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. 

The shop will be open 
Tuesday until 7 p.m. 

The thrift shop is located 



at Interfaith Social Services. 
105 Adams St., Quincy. 
(two blocks from the Quin- 
cy Center T Station). 

For more information, 
call 617-773-6203 ext. 21. 



The third annual Chil- 
dren's Choir-Fest, spon- 
sored by the music ministry 
of Sacred Heart Parish will 
be held from Aug. 10-14 
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
daily on the parish grounds. 
386 Hancock St. 

This year's camp theme 
is Moses and the Exodus. 

The program is for chil- 
dren entering grades three 
through seven as of Sept. 
2009. 

The goal of the Choir- 
Fet is to foster a better un- 
derstanding of the Church's 
liturgy and music. 

The week will include 
times for fun, games and 
crafts as well as singing and 
prayer. 

Boomwhackers (a gradu- 
ated series of tuned poles), 
recorders (flute-like instru- 
ments) and the parish's 
4-octave ChoirChimes set- 
will also be incorporated 
into the program. 

A hot lunch and two 
snacks will be provided 
daily, as well as dinner on 
Thursday evening. 



The week will culiminate 
Friday, Aug. 14 with a mu- 
sical of young voices about 
the Fxodus. "Moses and the 
Freedom Fanatics' by Hal 
H. Hopson. Following the 
perft)rmance, a "make your 
own sundae" party will be 
held. 

An extended day on 
Thursday, Aug. 13 is planned 
with final musical rehears- 
als, dinner, and a short hve- 
nmg Prayer liturgy. 

Choir-Fest openings are 
available until the deadline 
date of July 15. 

The cost is $1(X) per 
child and includes all work- 
books, music, crafts, lunch- 
es, snacks, and dinner on 
Thursday. 

A $25 deposit for each 
child is due with registra- 
tion, and the remainder paid 
in full by Aug. 1. 

For Choir-Fest reserva- 
tions or more information, 
contact Sacred Heart's rec- 
tory at 617-328-8666 for 
visit www.sacredheartquin- 
cy.org. 



Sunday worship at 
Quincy Community I'nited 
Methodist Church. 40 Beale 
St . Wollaston. will begin at 
10:30a.m with Rev Dr Su- 
san F. Jarek-Glidden. 

Adult Bible Study begins 
at 9 am 

Sunda) school for the 
children is alter the scrip- 



ture 

I 'shers are Paul and Lin- 
da DeKireco 

Coffee hour will be host- 
ed by Julie Walden, ShiHey 
Poore and Ann Giger 

All are welcome 

For more information, 
call the church at 617-773- 
3319 



Bethany Congregational 



Bethany Congregational 
Church 18 Spear St.. Quincy 
Center, will have a Sunday 
Communion Worship Ser- 
vice and Church School at 
10 a.m. 

Food items will be gath- 
ered for the ISS F(M)d Pan- 
try. 

The Re\ William C 
Harding will preach The 
Power of Jesus" 



Childcare will be avail 
able for infants and tod 
dlers 

Following the \\()rship 
service, there will be fel- 
lowship time in the .Allen 
ParK>r 

Light refreshments will 
be served 

All are welcome 

The church is handi- 
capped accessible. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Houghs Neck Congre- 
gational Church will mark 
Independence Day dunng 
its regular worship service 
Sunday, July 5 at 9:30 am 

All are welcome to attend 



the service and the fellow- 
ship coffee hour following 
worship. 

Pastor John Castncum 
will preach the sermon. 
"W hat IS Freedom'.'" 



First Church Of Squantum 

follow the service in the par- 



Sunday worship service 
at First Church of Squan- 
tum. 164 Bellevue Rd . 
Squantum begins at 10 a.m. 

Coffee and refreshments 



lor. 



.Men's breakfast is held 
downstairs Saturdays at 8 
am in Fellowship Hall. 



Assemblies of God 



158 Washiir^on SCQuincy 

phone: 773-9797 
Rev. Selwyn Bodley, Senior Pastor 

Sunday Worship. 10:30 a.m. 

Christian Ed: Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

Youth Group: Sunday 6 p.m. 

JYouth & Children's Ministry 
^•Contemporary Worship 
H •Marriage & Family Croup 
H flntematlonal Fellowship 



Quincy "ReCigion JDirectorym 



Evangelical 



Catholic 



St. Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 617-773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 11:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 



ST. AGATHA CHURCH 
MILTON-QUINCY 

432 Adams Street 

Milton, MA 02 1 86 • 6 1 7-698-2439 

Schedule of Masses 

Saturday: 4:30pm 

Sunday: 7: 30aiTi, 9:00am (Family Mass), 

10:30am,* 12 ncxin, 5:00pm 

Weekday Masses: 7:00am and 9:00am 

' Interpreted ASL Mass every 2nd Sunday at 

12 ntx)n & assistive devices for the hearing 

impaired avariable in Sacristy before Masses. 

Handicapped Accessible, handicapped 

parking, elevator to Upper/Lx)wer Churches 

air-conditioned 



Catholic 



SERVICES <fe ACTIVITIES 



Congregational 



Sacred Heart Church 

"A Roman Cattiolic Community walking together 

in Faith. Worship. Education and Service' 

386 Hancock St., North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617) 328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) and 5pm 

12 noon at Star of Sea Church 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



Catholic 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST 

44 School St., Quincy 

617-773-1021 
Weekend Mass Schedule 

Saturday, 4 p.m. 

Sunday, 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 

11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 

Weekday Masses 

Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. 
Handicapped Accessible 



St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 
SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 

Weel<day l\/lasses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:00-3:30 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditioned 



HOUGH'S NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue 

617-479-8778 

www.hncong.org 

Sunday Service 9:30am 

Pastor John Castricum 
matisFreedoin?" 



Congregational 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock St., Wollaston 
617-479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. John J. Ronaghan 

Weekend Mass Schedule: 

Saturday 4:00 PM 

Sunday 7:00, 9:00, 11:30AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairlift Available 



Methodist 



A 



QUINCY COMMUNITY ^ 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St.. Wollaston 

617-773-3319 

10:30 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Dr. Susan Jarek-Glidden, Pastor 




Bethany 

C()N(;RE(iATIONAL 

Church 

Spear & Coddington Streets 
Quincy Center, 617-479-7300 

WWW.yUINCYBKTHANYCHURCH.()R(; 

Sunday Communion Worship 
Service & Church School at 10 am 

Rev. William C. Harding 
will preach The Power of Jesus' 

ALL ARE WELCOME! 
Child Care Available 

Fellowship Time in Allen Parlor 
Light Refreshments 

Church is handicapped accessible 



WOLLASTON 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 
United Church of Christ 

48 WinthropAve. • 617-773-7432 

Sunday Worship 10 AM 

Rev. Dr. Mary Louise Gifford, 

Senior Pastor ■'The 9th Hat" 

Beginning Sunday, July 5, 2009 
Summer Worship at 9:00 am 



uantum Christian Fellowship 

f Questions'^ Come pursue answers. 
Sunday Worship 10 a.m. 

with Pastor Michael Fehan 

CniiOrens Teaching ^OntJ 

50 HucKins Ave 

I Hanaicapoea Accessible) 

Bidle Discuss/on Groups 

Call 617-773-58^8 or irLfQ'2'sauantumcf org 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd.. Wollaston 

Rev. John Swanson. Pastor 

Sunday Worship Service 10 AM 

Church Office (61 7) 479-6661 



Nazarene 



Congregational 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington St . • 617-773-6424 

Worship and Church School 10 am 

Rev. Ann Suzedell, Pastor 

visit us at www.QPCC.org 



Wollaston Church 
of the Nazarene 

37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston ,^^1^ 

(617)472-5669 

On The Campus Of 

Eastern Nazarene College 

Pastor: Rev. Fred. Fullerton 

Sunday S&yiQSS 

8:30 am - Holy Communion 

9:45 am - Adult & Children's 

Sunday School 

11 a.m. ■ Blended Worship Sen/ice 

Come Worstiip witti Us' 



EVAN(;ELI( AL 
CONGRE(;.AriONAL ( HI RCH 

^1*^ .\e\^bur> .Ave . N. Quincv .\1.A n:]"! 

Phone (S1-S4-4444 

Rev. Franc■|^ Balla. Pastor 

C'ontemporar> VVop.hip: Sundav 10 30 am 

Web site: http:/'www.eccquinc\.c(»m 



Christian Science 




First Church of 
Christ, Scientist 



10:30 AM Sijnda> Service 
& Sunday School 

Wednesday Evening Meeting 

20 Creenleaf Street, Quincy 
off Hancock Street 

617-472-0055 



Jewish 



Salvationist 



THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St.. Quincy • 617-472-2345 

9 45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

BRASS BAND MUSIC 

6PM TEEN SALVATION MEETING 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 



Temple Beth El 

1001 Hancock Street 

Quincy, M.A 02169 

617-479-4309 

Shabbat services — ^: 15 

Sunday - 9:00 

An egalitarian c(>ngregaliun 




To Advertise in this Directory, 
Call 617-471-3100 



Page 26 Tli« Qiilncy Sun Thursday, July 2, 2009 





Phyllis A. Swan, 61 

Insurance Analyst 

A funeral Mass for Phyl- 
lis A. Swan, 61, of Wey- 
mouth, formerly of Quincy, 
was celebrated June 27 in 
St. Albert's Church, Wey- 
mouth. 

Ms . Swan died June 1 8 at 
Quincy Medical Center. 

Born in Dorchester, she 
had lived in Quincy for 
50 years, graduating from 
Quincy High School. She 
moved to Weymouth with (Bradley) of Brockton; 
her sister, Catherine Swan, daughter of the late Ruth 
ten years ago. C. and Joseph P. Swan of 

An insurance analyst, she Quincy; aunt of Megan and 
had recently celebrated her Katelin Swan of Brockton. 
40'*' anniversary with Lib- Funeral arrangements 

erty Mutual Insurance and were made by the Lydon 
had planned on retiring in Chapel for Funerals, Quin- 
November. cy. 

She was an avid Red Memorial donations 

Sox and Patriots fan and en- may be made in her name 
joyed taking trips to Florida to The Jimmy Fund, Dana- 
for Red Sox spring training Farber Cancer institute, 



John A. Washington, III 

Worked For G.E., U^. Navy Veteran 



PHYLLIS A. SWAN 



A private funeral service 
for John Augustine Wash- 
ington 111, of Quincy, was 
held recently. 

Mr. Washington died 
June 20. 

Born in Miami, Florida, 
he served in the United 
States Navy for six years 
and had been employed by 
General Electric Company 
for 25 years as an MRl En- 
gineer. He was also an avid 
boatsman and navigator. 

He was also a highly 
skilled technical wreck- 
diver and all-around sports 
diver. 

Son of Virginia D. 
O'Neill; husband of Theresa 
L. Washington; brother of 
Max Stell. 



Norman F. Forde, 80 

World War II, Korean War Veteran 
Community Activist, Executive 




JOHN A. WASHINGTON 

He is also survived by 
many nieces, nephews and 
cousins. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hamel, 
Wickens & Troupe Funeral 
Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in his name to the 
Quincy Veterans Helping 
Veterans, 24 High School 
Ave, Quincy, MA 02169. 



camp. 

Sister of Catherine Swan 
of Weymouth and Joseph 
Swan and his wife Jane 



10 Brookline Place West, 
6"' Floor, Brookline, MA 
02445-7226, attn: Contribu- 
tion Services. 



Walter A. Bullock, 59 

U.S. Army Veteran 



A funeral service for Wal- 
ter A. Bullock, 59, of East 
Boston, formeriy of Quincy, 
was conducted June 26 at 
the MA National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Mr. Bullock died June 22 
at the VA Medical Center, 
West Roxbury. 

Bom in Quincy, he was a 
United States Army veteran 
of the Vietnam War. 

Son of the late Irene F. 
(Regan) and Arthur F. Bull- 
ock, Sr.; brother of Thomas 
Bullock of Quincy, Arthur F. 



Bullock, Jr. and his Frankie 
of CA, Cathie E. McCallum 
and her husband William of 
N. Quincy and Carol J. Bull- 
ock of FL; fiance of Marie 
Hruska of East Boston. 

He is also survived by 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment with Military 
Honors was in the MA Na- 
tional Cemetery, Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hamel, 
Wickens & Troupe Funeral 
Home, 26 Adams St., Quin- 
cy Center. 



Mary D'Ambrosia, 94 

Worked In Garment Industry 

A funeral Mass for Mary D'Ambrosia; stepmother of 

(Maligno) D'Ambrosia, 94, Judith Rose and her husband 

of Weymouth, formerly of Robert of PA; sister of Anna 

Quincy, was celebrated June Alongi of Quincy and the 

25 in St. John's Church, late Cari, Charies "Matty" 

Quincy. and Michael Maligno and 

Mrs. D'Ambrosia died Millie Ciapetti; sister in-law 

June 22 at the Marina Bay of Millie Maligno of Quincy 

Skilled Nursing Facility, and Inez Maligno of Somer- 



Quincy. 

Bom in Quincy, she had 
lived in Weymouth since 
1957. She retired from the 
garment industry after many 
years. She was a member 
of the Ladies International 
Garment Union Workers 
and a member of St John's 
Senior Citizen Club. 

Wife of the late Adam 



ville. 

She is also survived by 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in St. 
Francis Xavier Cemetery, 
Weymouth. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
Quincy. 



Frank E. Pineau 




DON McCarthy 

Managing Director 



A Thought 
For Th£ ^hk 

FREEDOM - what a wonderful, 
meaningful word! One synonym 
for the word is privilege. . . 

And privileged we are ... In our 
American way of life, we have more 
privileges than any other people 
on earth. We are privileged to wor- 
ship where and when we wish . . . 
privileged to work where we choose . . . privileged to 
educate ourselves to any degree we wish . . . privileged 
to seek and earn better living conditions. . . privileged 
to travel where and when we wish . . . privileged to 
express our thoughts, to agree or disagree with our 
fellow men . . . privileged to be able to vote the way 
we wish and for whom we wish. . . 

INDEPENDENCE . . . FREEDOM ... is a day by 
day privilege that must be earned. It is not a conces- 
sion we can take for granted. And so, on this 4th of 
July, would it not be fitting and proper for all of us to 
bend our knees and fold our hands and give thanks 
for the privilege of being an AMERICAN? 

Deware Funeral Home 

Service Beyond Expectations 
Wollaston Chapel 
576 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 

(617) 472-1137 

Affordability Plus Service 

Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 

A Service Family J^liate ofAFFS and Service Corp. Int. 

492 Rock Street • Fall River. MA 02720 • (508) 676-2454 




Visiting hours for Frank 
E. "Farmer" Pineau, of 
Quincy, were conducted 
June 25 in the Lydon Chapel 
for Funerals, Quincy. 

Mr. Pineau died June 23. 

Husband of Elaine Levine 
Pineau; father of Cheryl 
Donovan and her husband 
James of Plymouth, Debo- 
rah DiGravio of Falmouth, 
Christopher Pineau and his 
wife Donna of Hanover, 
Stephanie Pineau of Wey- 
mouth, Stacey Pineau of 
Falmouth and Gary and Beth 
Levine of Braintree; brother 



of Donald Pineau and his 
wife Shirley of Weymouth, 
Gene Pineau and his wife 
Virginia of Maiden, Frank 
Glynn of Quincy and the 
late Eddie "Pepper" Glynn, 
Vernon Glynn and Ruth Fra- 
zier; brother in-law of James 
Frazier of GA . 

He is also survived by 
nine grandchildren and three 
great grandchildren. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in his name to the 
Hospice of the South Shore, 
100 Bay State Drive, Brain- 
tree, MA 021 84. 



A Mass of Christian 
Burial for Norman F. Forde, 
80, of Middleborough, for- 
merly of Wollaston, a Ma- 
rine Corps veteran of two 
wars and a Quincy com- 
munity activist, was cele- 
brated Monday in St. Ann's 
Church, Wollaston. 

Mr. Ford died unexpect- 
edly but peacefully in his 
sleep at home June. 25. 

He had lived in Wollaston 
for 44 years before moving 
to Middleborough in 2005. 

Bom in Boston, he was 
raised in Milton. 

He attended Boston Col- 
lege High School. 

A member of the U.S. 
Marine Corps, Mr. Forde 
was a veteran of World War 
II and the Korean War. He 
was honorably discharged 
in 1951. 

Throughout his life, Mr. 
Forde approached his pro- 
fessional and community ac- 
tivities with the same energy 
and enthusiasm that charac- 
terized his family life. 

He was a successful ex- 
ecutive for several decades 
in the tire and sporting 
goods industries. 

A well-known activist 
in Quincy, he was the co- 
founder of Faxon House at 
Quincy City Hospital, one 
of the first alcohol detoxi- 
fication centers in Massa- 
chusetts. He also chaired the 
Governor's Advisory Coun- 
cil on Alcoholism and served 
on the City of Quincy 's Rent 
Grievance Board. 

More recently, Mr. Forde 
served as the assistant coach 
of the sailing team at St. 
Sebastian's School in Need- 
ham. 

He greatly enjoyed life 
and had many interests, in- 



^^^^^^^^^^^m ' ^^^^^^^^^^1 


1 


r A^f ^^ 





NORMAN F. FORDE 

eluding skiing, sailing, gar- 
dening and spirited political 
debate. 

He is survived by his 
beloved wife, Joan L. (Mo- 
riarty) Forde; his children, 
Suzanne Ford Rynne and 
her husband, Christopher 
Rynne, M.D. of Scituate, 
Timothy Ford and his wife 
Gail Bernstein of Bethesda, 
MD, Jerry Ford and his wife 
Ann Marie (O'Malley) Ford 
of Quincy and Laura Forde 
of New York, N.Y. 

He was also the devoted 
grandfather of Deirdre, 
Bridget and Patrick Rynne, 
Christina, Kathleen, Ste- 
phen and Elizabeth Ford, 
and Benjamin, Alexander 
and Emma Forde. 

Mr. Forde was the be- 
loved brother of Marion 
Blanchard, Dorothy Pike, 
Virginia Wells, Stephen 
Forde, Jr., and the late John 
Forde. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 Han- 
cock St., Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Father Bill's 
Mainspring, 38 Broad St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



Christopher J. Berryman 



Visiting hours for Chris- 
topher J. Berryman, of 
Weymouth, formerly of 
Winthrop and Revere, were 
conducted June 28 at the 
Hamel, Wickens & Troupe 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

He was a longtime mem- 
ber of the Ancient Free and 



Over 60 Years 
Of Personalized Service 

SWEENEY BROTHERS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. • FRANCIS M. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

(617)472-6344 



Accepted Masons. 

Father of Amy (Kate) 
Berryman of Quincy; son 
of the late Chester and Edna 
(Christopher) Berryman of 
Revere; former husband of 
Sylvia Saidel of Randolph. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in his name to the 
South Humane Society. 

r > 

Hamel, Wickens & 

IVoupe Funeral 

Home 

Honored Providers of: 

B Veterans 
Funeral Care" 

PHONE TOLL FREE 

(800) 696-5887 

26 Adams Street 

Quincy, Ma 02169 

www.HamelFuneralCare.con] 



Th'ursdky, July 2, 2009 Tl»e QviiAcy SUn Pm 27 



Ann M. Brady 

Bank Officer 



A funeral Mass for Ann 
M. Brady, of Quincy, for- 
merly of Dorchester, was 
celebrated Wednesday in 
Sacred Heart Church, North 
Quincy. 

Ms. Brady died June 26. 

Born in Boston, she spent 
several years in Dorchester 
before moving to Quincy 39 
years ago. She worked as a 
bank officer for Boston Safe 
Deposit & Trust and later 
worked for Bank of Boston . 
She was proud of her Irish 
heritage and loved to travel 
to Ireland. She also enjoyed 
trips to Italy, Bermuda, Eu- 
rope and Cape Cod. 

Ms. Brady was a fan of 
both the Red Sox and Pa- 
triots and she volunteered 
at Sacred Heart Church in 
North Quincy. 

Daughter of the late Ed- 
ward and Mary (Murphy) 
Brady; cousin of Mary 
Clark and her husband Dick 
of Milton, Sara Murphy of 
NY and Helen McGee of Ja- 
maica Plain; friend of Joan 




ANN M. BRADY 

Corkery of Quincy, Mary 
Warren of Weymouth and 
Arlene McFarland of Mil- 
ton. 

She is also survived by 
cousins in Boston and Ire- 
land. 

Interment was in Blue 
Hill Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in her name to 
Sacred Heart Church. 386 
Hancock St., North Quincy. 
MA 02171. 



Jeanne Rathgeb-Ryan, 51 

Sales Manager 



A Mass of Christian 
Burial for Jeanne Rathgeb- 
Ryan, 51, of Plantation, 
Florida, formerly of Quincy, 
was celebrated June 27 in 
St. Agatha Church, Milton. 

Mrs. Rathgeb-Ryan died 
June 17. 

Born in Boston, she 



Joseph P. Rathgeb and his 
wife Elaine of Foxboro and 
Susan M. Coulter and her 
husband Blair of Wrentham; 
aunt of Samantha, Alison. 
Caroline, Blair, Ryan and 
Jack; niece of Thomas and 
Gerri Hayes, Bernard. Car- 
olyn and the late Francis 



graduated from Archbishop Hayes and Gertrude and the 
Williams HS in 1976 and late Paul McCabe. 



Simmons College in 1980. 
She worked as a sales man- 
ager in radio advertising in 
Florida. 

Daughter of the late Jo- 
seph A. and Marguerite 



She is also survived by 
many cousins. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dolan Fu- 
neral Home, Milton. 

Interment was in Mt. 



(Hayes) Rathgeb; sister of Benedict Cemetery. 

Dorothy Ross, 98 

Bookkeeper 



Private funerals services 
for Dorothy (Porter) Ross, 
98, of Quincy, were con- 
ducted recently. 

Mrs. Ross died June 18 
at the Marina Bay Skilled 
Nursing and Rehabilitation 
Center, Quincy. 

Bom in Holden, she was 
raised and educated in Hold- 
en schools and graduated 
from Holden High School. 
She had lived in Quincy 
most of her life and worked 
as a bookkeeper for many 
years at the former Hard- 
ing Welding Company of 



Quincy. 

She was a member of the 
Eastern Star and had many 
hobbies including garden- 
ing, knitting and crocheting. 

Wife of the late Charles 
A. Ross; sister of Muriel Ja- 
siak of Holden and the late 
Annie Bell, Arthur Porter, 
Jr. and Pricilla Brady. 

She is also survived by 
many nieces, nephews, 
grandnieces and grandneph- 
ews and many friends. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funer- 
als, Quincy. 



Denise Marie McManus, 39 



A prayer service for De- 
nise Marie McManus, 39, of 
Weymouth and Quincy, was 
conducted June 26 in the 
Chapman, Cole & Gleason 
Funeral Home, Milton. 

Mrs. McManus died June 
22. 

Mother of Paul Kelly of 
Weymouth; friend of John 
Palermo of Weymouth; 
daughter of Karen (Conroy) 
Burke of Quincy and the 



late Edward McManus and 
Papa Joe Higgins of Quin- 
cy; sister of Lynn Lawlor of 
Marshfield, Maureen Mc- 
Manus of Quincy and Debo- 
rah McManus of Canton. 

She is also survived by 
several nieces and nephews. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in her name to the 
American Cancer Soci- 
ety, 1115 W. Chestnut St., 
Brockton, MA 02301. 



James A. Morgan III, 60 

President Boston Chassis & Trailer Repair 



Ashley Varieur, 22 



Nurse's Aide 



A funeral Mass for James 
A. Morgan III, 60, of Wey- 
mouth, formerly of North 
Quincy and South Boston, 
was celebrated June 26 in 
St. Albert the Great Church, 
Weymouth. 



of North Quincy and the late 
Sean Morgan and his wife 
Debra Flemming of Wey- 
mouth; grandfather of Va- 
larie. Timothy, Kenley. Sha- 
mus. Matthew and James A 
(Shamus); great-grandfather 



Mr. Morgan died June of Lily Rose; brother in-law 
23. of Brenda Green of Lynn 

and Lisa and Kenneth Sails- 
man; uncle of James Lucas 
111. Angela Lucas. Christine 
Pena and Shanel M. Sails- 
man. 

He is also survived by 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Blue 
Hill Cemetery. Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the McDon- 
ald Funeral Home. South 
Weymouth. 

Memorial donations 



Born in South Boston, he 
was raised in North Quincy 
and had lived in Weymouth 
for the past 25 years. He was 
a US Army veteran and was 
the founder and president of 
Boston Chassis & Trailer 
Repair in Weymouth. 

Husband of Lucinda 
"Cindy" A. (Cook) Mor- 
gan; father of James A. IV 
and his wife Kerri Morgan 
of Rockland. Christine A. 
Blankney of TN. Adam P. 
Morgan of Weymouth and may be made to the James 
Dina M. Morgan of Wey- A. Morgan 111 Scholarship 



mouth; brother of William 
Morgan (MD) and his wife 
Colleen of Boylston. Denise 
and her husband Tom Burke 



Fund, c/o Crayon College, 
24 Main St., Kingston. MA 
02364. 



William H. Boyd 

Accountant, USAF Veteran 



A funeral Mass for Wil- 
liam H. Boyd, of Braintree. 
formerly of Quincy. was 
celebrated Monday in St. 
Francis of Assisi Church. 
Braintree. 

Mr. Boyd died June 24 at 



Mr. Boyd was a retired 
accountant and auditor for 
the United Shoe Machinery 
Company in Boston, which 
later became Black & Deck- 
er Company of Hartford. 
CT. He worked for the firm 



South Shore Hospital . Wey- for more than 40 years. 



mouth. 

Born in Quincy, he grad- 
uated from Quincy High 
School and Bentley School 
of Accounting in Boston. 
He had lived in Braintree 
since 1986. He was a Com- 
municant of St. Francis of 
Assisi Parish and a former 
Communicant of St. Jo- 
seph s Church in Quincy. 
Mr. Boyd was also formerly 
active in the Knights of Co- 
lumbus and the St. Vincent 
de Paul Society in Quincy. 

He served in World War 
11 overseaii in France. Ger- 
many and Central Europe 
in the US Air Force. He 
received several medals in- 
cluding the Air Medal with 
six bronze stars. 



Husband of the late Mary 
(Conlon) Boyd; brother of 
Mary F. Boyd of Braintree 
and the late John A. Boyd 
and Gertrude (Boyd) Sha- 
nahan; brother in-law of 
Frances Conlon of West 
Roxbury. 

He is also survived b\ 
several nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Old 
North Cemetery, Wey- 
mouth. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Mortimer 
N. Peck-Russell Peck Fu- 
neral Home, Braintree. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in his name to St. 
Francis of Assisi Church, 
856 Washington St.. Brain- 
tree, MA 02184. 



Marion Lacerenzo, 85 

Secretary 

A funeral Mass for Mar- 
ion (Dempsey) Lacerenzo, 
85. of Quincy. was celebrat- 
ed June 27 in St. Joseph's 
Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Lacerenzo died 
June 23 at Quincy Medical 
Center. 

Born in Quincy, she was 
raised and educated in Quin- 
cy schools and was gradu- 
ate of Quincy High School. 
She was a lifelong Quincy 
resident. She was a former 
secretary with the Common- als, Quincy 
wealth of Massachusetts, re- 



tiring many years ago. 

Wife of the late Nor- 
man Lacerenzo; sister of 
Anne Santo of CA, Barbara 
Gurnis of TX and Kathleen 
Reynolds of TN. 

She is also survived by 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery. West Quin- 
cy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funer- 




Honor Your 
Loved One's 

Memory 
With Flowers 

cIiffords.com 

1.800.441.8884 



A funeral Mass for Ash- 
ley Varieur. 22. of Palm 
Springs, CA, formeriy ot 
Quincy and Weymouth, 
was celebrated luesday in 
Our Lady of Good Counsel 
Church. Quincy 

Ms. Varieur died June 
21. 

Born m Boston, she had 
lived in Quinc> and We)- 
mouth and had moved to 
California last year A grad 
uateofQuinc) High School, 
she worked as a certified 
nurse's aide at Quincy Nurs- 
ing and Rehab She was a 
fun-loving, active and ad- 
venturous woman and wiji 
be missed by many of her 
friends 

Daughter of Kathleen .\1 
Pitts of Quincy and Ldward 
L. Varieur of Waltham; sis- 
ter of Jason Snaith of Wev- 
mouth; granddaughter of 
Herbert and Nancy (John- 
ston) Pitts of Quinc) and 
Louis and the late .Mary 
Vaneur of Leominster; girl- 




ASHLKYVARIKIR 

friend ot Walter Parker of 
CA 

She IS also survived b\ 
manv aunts, uncles and 
cousins 

Funeral arrangements 
were made bv the Dennis 
Sweene> Funeral Home, 
Quincy. 

.Memonal donations may 
be made in her name to the 
Juvenile Diabetes Research 
Foundation. 12(J Wall St.. 
19"' Floor. New York. NY 
|(KJ(J5. 



Mary T. Sheehan 

Worked For Bank Of Boston 



A 

Mary 



funeral Mass for 
T. (Heaney) Shee- 
han, of Quincy, formeriv oi' 
Dorchester, was celebrated 
June 26 in Sacred Heart 
Church, North Quincy. 

Mrs. Sheehan died June 
23. 

She had worked at Bank 
of Boston in Dorchester for 
many years before retiring 
and enjoyed baking, trav- 
eling and cake decorating 
Her familv was the most im- 
pt)rtant part of her life. 

Wife of the late William 
Sheehan; mother of Mar\ 
Pratt and her husband Kevin 
of Quincy. William "Jeff" 
Sheehan and his wife Liza- 
beth of GA. Donna Flynn 
and her husband Thomas of 
Plymouth. Kathleen Drew 
and her husband Paul of 



Bostor, Richard Sheehan of 
Quincy and Francis "Fran" 
Sheehan of "Waltham; sister 
of the late Ow en and .Martin 
Francis Heanev ; grandmoth- 
er of Jonathan and Kern 
Sheehan of GA , Christopher 
and Debra FIvnn of Plvm- 
outh, Keiiv .McQuillen of 
Boston, William Drew of 
NY and Carissa Falzarano 
of Boston. 

Interment was in Ce- 
dar Grove Cemetery. 
Dorchester. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made bv the Keohane 
Funeral Home. Quincv 

.Memorial donations 

may be made in her name 
to the Dana-Farber Cancer 
Institute Breast Cancer Re- 
search. 10 Brookline Place. 
Brookline. MA 02445. 



More Obituaries On Page 29 




DOLAN 

FUNERAL SERVICES 
' Ca ring fo r your I ife 's jo iirney" 

♦ Funerals 

♦ Cremations 

♦ Pre-Arrangements 

Senicc times and directions at: 
www.dolanfuneral.com 



THE POL^N FAMILY 
VV. Craig 
Paul F. " 
Frederick |. 
Courtney 



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literature 




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cousin 


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block name 


23 


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e-mail 


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place 


51 


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27 


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15 Yuletide 


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rendition 


53 


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16 Joan of — 




towel 


32 


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33 


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minute sort 


39 


Jed Clampett 


30 Convent 


3 


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portrayer 


denizen 


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42 


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31 Actor Sharif 




work, with 




speaker 


32 Lair 




"The" 


43 


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order 


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34 Writer Tan 


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container 


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ritual 


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© 2009 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



Wishing m Well 




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HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will give you a 
message every day. It's a numerical puzzle designed to spell 
out your fortune. Count the letters in your first name. If the 
number of letters is 6 or more, subtract 4. If the number is less 
than 6, add 3. The result is your key number Start at the up- 
per left-hand comer and check one of your key numbers, left 
to right. Then read the message the letters under the 
checked figures give you. 

e 2009 King Feature* Syndfcale. Inc World rights reserved. 



BY 
HENRY BOLTINOFF 




Find at least six differences in details between panels. I 




0) 

To 

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SI i|9q aqoH 2 luajayip ajB SBLuefed s.Aog t saouajsjiio 




Trivid 

test byPifil 
Rodnguez 



1 ASTRONOMY: The adjec- 
tive "Jovian" is used in refer- 
ence to which of the planets 
in our solar system? 

2. TELEVISION: Who is the 
voice of Moe the bartender 
on "The Simpsons"? 

3. MOVIES: Who plays the 
human mother of Spook in 
the 2009 movie version of 
"Star Trek"? 

4. MYTHOLOGY: In Greek 
mythology, who rules the un- 
derworld? 

5. U.S. PRESIDENTS: 
Which U.S. president died of 
pneumonia only 32 days after 
taking office? 

6. LITERATURE: When was 
the novel "Goodbye, Colum- 
bus" by Phillip Roth pub- 
lished? 



7. FOOD & DRINK: What 
kind of food is a peanut 
(which isn't really a nut)? 

8. EARTH SCIENCE: How 
much of the Earth's surface is 
covered by the oceans? 

9. LANGUAGE: What is an- 
other name for a lexicon? 

10. MATH: How many dif- 
ferent symbols are used in 
Roman numerals? 

Answers 

1 . Jupiter 

2. HankAzaria 

3. Wmona Ryder 

4. Hades 

5. William Henry Harrison 

6. 1959 

7 . A legume 

8. 71 percent 

9. Dictionary 
10. Seven 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



MAGIC MAZE • FATHER — 

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forward, backward, up, down and diagonally. 

And son Figure In-law Symbol 

Brown Flanagan Land Time 

Christmas Hood Of his country Winter 

Confessor Image Surrogate 

£ 2009 Khg Features Syndicate, Inc. MorU righis reserved 



SaloiTK's 

Stars 



ARIES (March 21 to April 19) 
Get your facts together and be- 
come familiar with them before 
you have to face up to that in- 
terview. The better prepared you 
are, the easier it will be to make 
that important impression. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 
20) New information might war- 
rant changing your mind about 
a recently made decision. Never 
mind the temporaiy confusion it 
might cau.se. Acting on the truth 
is always preferable. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) 
Creating a loving atmosphere for 
those you care for could pay off 
in many ways. Expect to hear 
some unexpected but very wel- 
come news that can make a big 
difference in your life. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) Stepping away from an old 
and seemingly insoluble problem 
might be helpful. Use the time 
to take a new look at the situa- 
tion and perhaps work out a new 
methcxl of dealing with it. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
You're still in a favorable goal- 
setting mode. However, you 
might need to be a little more re- 
alistic about some of your aims. 
Best to reach for what is currently 
doable. The rest will follow. 

VIRGO (August 23 to Sep- 
tember 22) A setback is never 
easy to deal with. But it could 
be a boon in disguise. Recheck 
your proposal, and strengthen 
the weak spots. Seek advice from 
someone who has "been there 
and done that." 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Coming up with a 
new way of handling a tedious 



job-regulated chore could lead to 
more than just a congratulatory 
memo once the word reaches the 
"right people." Good luck. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) What you might 
call determination someone else 
might regard as stubtwrnness. 
Lcx)k for ways to reach a com- 
promise that won't require a ma- 
jor shift of views on your part. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 
22 to December 21) You're still 
in a vulnerable mcxie vis-a-vis 
"offers" that sound tot^ gcxxi to 
be true. So continue to be skepti- 
cal about anything that can't be 
backed up with provable facts. 

CAPRICORN (December 
22 to January 19) Thrift is still 
dominant this week. What you 
don't spend on what you don't 
need will be available for you to 
draw on should a possible (albeit 
temporary) money crunch hit. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) Staying close to 
home early in the week allows 
for some introspection about your 
social life. Sort out your feelings 
before rejoining your fun-time 
fellows on the weekend. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) It can be a bit daunt- 
ing as well as exciting to find 
yourself finally taking action on a 
long-delayed move for a change. 
It helps to stay with it when oth- 
ers rally to support you. 

BORN THIS WEEK: Your 
love of home and family provide 
you with the emotional support 
you need to find success in the 
outside worid. 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



CryptoQuip 

This is a simple substitution cipher in which each letter used stands 

for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal throughout 

the puzzle. Solution is accomplished by thai and error. 

Clue: Y equals U 

AX NMY JARL 

WMG ID JAQLI DVGD 

WMQDAQYL XMC KAJLI, 



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) 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



King Crossword 

ANSWERS 

Solution time: 25 mins. 



Magic Maze 
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Tbur>da>,Jul.v2,20O9 Tlte Qxtincy Sian Page 29 



• • * On The Campaign Trail - City Election 2009 • * * 



With the campaign season underway for this fall's city election, The Quincy Sun 
will publish, from time to time and when space is available, press releases submit- 
ted from candidates and their committees. 

The Sun wants its readers to know the releases are not written by Quincy Sun 
staff. The Sun retains the right to edit releases for space purposes. 

Telephone Workers, Plumbers, Gasfitters 
Endorse Davis For Ward 4 Councillor 



Ward 4 Council Candidate Palmucci 
Submits Nearly 400 Nomination Signatures 



Two unions - Telephone 
Workers Union Local 2222 
and Plumbers and Gasfitters 
Local 12 - have endorsed 
Ward 4 Council lor Jay Davis 
in his bid for re-election. 

P.J. Foley, chairman 
of the Telephone Workers 
IBEW Local 2222 's Com- 
mittee on Political Educa- 
tion, said, "Jay Davis recog- 
nizes that working families 



are the heart and soul of any 
great city. From day one, 
his support for our union 
on quality of life issues 
has been unmatched. For 
that reason," Foley added, 
"IBEW Local 2222 has 
endorsed Jay Davis in the 
Ward 4 Councillor's race." 
At a recent membership 
meeting, the members of 
Plumbers and Gasfitters, 



Local 12 voted to endorse 
Davis. 

"We have a lot of mem- 
bers who live in Ward 4," 
said Kevin Cotter, Local 12 
Business Manager. "It was 
an easy vote. They know 
that Councillor Davis has 
consistently worked on the 
behalf of people who get up 
every day and go to work." 



Ward 4 City Council 
candidate Brian Palmucci 
announces he has officially 
qualified for the 2009 city 
election ballot. 

Palmucci said he is 
poised to challenge incum- 
bent Ward 4 Councillor Jay 
Davis, who has never been 
opposed. 

"I'm honored to be on 
the ballot," says Palmucci. 
a former Assistant District 
Attorney and current state 
prosecutor. 

"It has been a long time 
since Ward 4 voters have had 
a choice about who should 
represent them on the City 



Council, and 1 believe West 
Quincy needs a change for 
the better " 

Palmucci said his cam- 
paign delivered "a whop- 
ping 180 certified voter sig- 
natures" to the City Clerk's 
office, far exceeding the 
50-signature requirement. 

In addition. Palmucci 
said his campaign also sub- 
mitted an additional 204 sig- 
natures to the City Clerk's 
office July 26. and is await- 
ing their certification 

Palmucci said he collect- 
ed the signatures himself, 
personally canvassing cit\ 
neighborhoods and bring- 



ing his views and campaign 
platform to the front doors 
of the voters. 

"This IS going to be a 
grassrcxjts campaign from 
start to finish, and the best 
way to wage a grassroots 
campaign is b> hitting the 
streets and talking directly 
to the voters," said Palmuc- 
ci, a Willard Street resident 

"1 will continue to go 
door-to-door throughout the 
campaign, as I have been 
doing since December I 
look forward to talking with 
residents about the issues 
that are important to them "' 



Obituaries 



Kimberly A. Mario, 41 



Deborah J. Ferrante, 59 



A funeral Mass for Kim- 
berly A . (Connor) Mario, 4 1 , 
of Northborough, formerly 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
June 27 in St. Bemadette's 
Church, Northborough. 

Mrs. Mario died June 22. 

Bom and raised in Quin- 
cy, she graduated from North 
Quincy High School in 1986 
and earned her Bachelor's 
degree from Suffolk Uni- 
versity. She had lived in 
Northborough for the past 
nine years. 

Mrs. Mario most recent- 
ly worked at the law firm 
of Bowditch and Dewey in 
Worcester before choosing 
to stay at home and raise her 
family. Earlier in her career, 
she had worked for Beacon 
Residential Management 
and Mintz, Levin, Cohn, 

Peter D. 
George 

Inventor, 
US Navy Veteran 

A funeral service for Peter 
D. George, of Hollywood, 
Florida, formeriy of Quincy, 
was conducted Wednesday 
at Mount Auburn Cemetery, 
Cambridge. 

Mr. George died May 9. 

Bom in Springfield, MA 
he was a graduate of Went- 
worth Institute and was a 
member of the Black and 
Gold Society. He was presi- 
dent and owner of the PM 
Instrument Company of 
Cambridge and Florida. 

Mr. George was an inven- 
tor and held many patents 
on his inventions and many 
of those inventions aided the 
medical field. 

He was a United States 
Navy veteran of World War 
II, having served with the 
submarine service. 

Father of Maureen 
Burke, Peter M. George 
and his stepson Robert D. 
Whitney; brother of Sophie 
Vergados and George M. 
George; grandfather of Jo- 
seph Burke and Deborah 
Gallagher; husband of the 
late Sally Naser. 



Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, 
PC both in Boston. 

Wife of Scott L. Mario; 
mother of Christian A. and 
Cole C. Mario of Northbor- 
ough; daughter of Paul and 
Rosalie (Gulinello) Connor 
of Marlborough; sister of 
Jeffrey Connor of Wash- 
ington, DC and Christopher 
Connor of NY; daughter in- 
law of Louis and Beverly 
Mario of Revere; grand- 
daughter of Anthony and 
Helen Gulinello of Brock- 
ton; goddaughter of Chris- 
tine Heath of Duxbury and 
Paul Gulinello of Boston. 

She is also survived by 
many aunts, uncles, cousins, 
nieces and nephews. 



Interment was in Howard 
Street Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hays Fu- 
neral Home, Northborough. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in her name to The 
Massachusetts Society for 
the Prevention of Cmelty to 
Animals (MSPCA-Angell), 
attn: Donations, 350 South 
Hunfington Ave, Boston, 
MA 02130. 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR APPOINTMENT 

OF CONSERVATOR 

Docket No. NO09P0148CV 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

35 Shawmut Road 

Canton, MA 02021 

In the matter of: 

Yan C. Lau 
Of: QUINCY, MA 
To the above named per- 
son, his/her spouse, and 
heirs apparent or presump- 
tive, a petition has been filed 
in the above captioned mat- 
ter alleging that the subject 
named above, by reason of: 
mental weakness is unable to 
properly care for his/her prop- 
erty and requesting that Wal 
Fong Lau Leung of Quincy, 
MA or some other suitable 
person be appointed his/her 
conservator to serve. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO. YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT: 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
Au gust 4, 2009 . 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court. 

Date: June 22, 2009. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of ProlMte 
7/2/09 



NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR APPOINTMENT 
OF GUARDIAN 
OF MENTALLY 
RETARDED PERSON 
Docket No. N009P1348GD 
Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 
The Trial Court 
Probate and Family Court 
35 Shawmut Road 
Canton, MA 02021 
In the matter of: 
Johanna Gallop 
Of: Quincy, MA 
To the above named ward, 
her spouse, and heirs appar- 
ent or presumptive, a petition 
has been filed in the above 
captioned matter alleging 
that said ward of Quincy, 
MA is a mentally retarded 
person to the degree that 
she is incapable of making 
informed decisions with re- 
spect to the conduct of her 
personal affairs and request- 
ing that David B. Arnold of 
Hingham, MA or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
guardian of the person: and 
property - with authority to 
administer antipsychotic 
medications in accordance 
with the treatment plan: to 
serve Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO. YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT: 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
Oa/ 1 8/200 9 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court 

Date: June 15, 2009. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
7/2/09 



A funeral Mass for Debo- 
rah J. Ferrante, 59, of East 
Bridgewater, formerly of 
Quincy, Medfield, Taunton 
and Abington, was celebrat- 
ed Tuesday in St. Marys 
Church, West Quincy. 

Mrs. Ferrante died June 
25. 

Bom in Quincy, she had 
previously lived in Medfield, 
Taunton and Abington. 

Daughter of the late 
Ralph J. Ferrante and Cath- 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
Docket No. NO09P1542EA 
Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 
The Trial Court 
Probate and Family Court 
35 Shawmut Road 
Canton, MA 02021 
In the Estate of: 
John B. Coyne 
Late of: Quincy, MA 02169 
Date of Death: 12/12/2006 
To ail persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, a 
petition has been presented 
requesting that a document 
purporting to be the last will 
of said decedent be proved 
and allowed and that Jose- 
phine T. Coyne of Braintree, 
MA be appointed executor/ 
trix, named in the will to serve 
Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT: 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
8/0 5/2009 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) In accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court. 
Date June 23, 2009 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 

7/2/09 



erine J. (Vissa) Ferrante 
Doyle; niece of Madeline 
Wood of Hingham. Angeli- 
na Varrasso of Braintree and 
the late Gino Vissa. 

She is also survived buy 
many cousins and fnends. 

Interment was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 



Quinc) 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
Docket No. NO09P1533EA 
Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 
The Trial Court 
Probate and Family Court 
35 Shawmut Road 
Canton, MA 02021 
In the Estate of: 
Josephine Demeo 
Late of: Quincy, MA 02169 
Date of Death: 05/04/2009 
To all persons interested 
in the above captioned es- 
tate, a petition has been 
presented requesting that a 
document purporting to be 
the last will of said dece- 
dent be proved and allowed 
and that Anthony R. Demeo 
of Abington, MA, Elaine M. 
Demeo of Quincy, MA and 
John E. Demeo of Braintree, 
MA be appointed executor/ 
trix, named In the will to serve 
Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT: 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
08/05/2009 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) In accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court 

Date: June 22, 2009 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
7/2/09 



LEGAL NOTICE 



Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family 

Court Department 

Norfolk Division 

DocketNo01P2903GI 
Notice of 
Fiduciary's Account 

To the persons interested 
in the estate of Oliver Lus- 
sler of Quincy, in the county 
of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass R Civ. 
P Rule 72 that the lst-7th 
and final account(s) of Fam- 
ily Service Association as 
permanent guardian (the 
fiduciary) of said property of 
said Oliver Lussier has been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objec- 
tion to said account(s), you 
or your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Canton on or before 
the 8th day of July, 2009 the 
return day of this citation. You 
may upon written request 
by registered or certified 
mail to the fiduciary or to 
the attorney of the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you must, 
in addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such Item 
together with the grounds 
for each objection thereto, a 
copy to be sen/ed upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P Rule 5 

WITNESS. Robert W 
Langlois, ESQUIRE, FIRST 
JUSTICE of said Court at 
Canton this 28th day of May. 
2009 

PATRICK W McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 

From Office of: 

Susan Mandra Thompson, 

Esquire 

Guardianship Program 

Family Service Association 

101 Rock Street 

Fail River. MA 02720 

7/2/09 



rase.30 m^eQuvlsuvr^Sw^ T^ursdi|y^July^.;Ul|99 



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FOR SALE 



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CEMETERY 

Single lot for 2 burials incl. 

2 custom built vaults 

1 bronze memorial 

321-474-2374 

7/16 



FOR SALE- 2005 

HONDA SHADOW 750 

Dark blue and black with chrome 
8,000 miles, saddle bags and 

windshield. Mint condition 
$5500 - John 617-773-4761 
'Smart people ride a bike' 

IK 



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3 are maple cabinet 

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(can he used in a kitchen) 

4, 4x5 mirrors 

included... $300 

2 lighted glass 
display cases... $100 

1 lighted glass tower 
display case... $150 

All are in excellent condition 

Call Nanci at 781-956-6903 



WANTED 



OLD HAND TOOLS 
& BOOKS WANTED 

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machinist, and sheetmetai tools, 

calipers, clamps, anvils, vises. 

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military, hunting and fishing items. 

LIBERTY TOOL CO. 

888-405-2007 

Davisto\vnmuseuin.org 

e-Store & antique sale! 1 1 



PERSONAL 



IN MEMORY 

of 

BETTY LAURETTO 

4th Anniversary 

Died July 3, 2005 

We love you and miss you. 

Husband Dan and Family 

111 



SERVICES 



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QUINCY HIGH 
SCHOOL '55 

Looking to purchase a QHS 
yearbook 1954 or 1955. 
Call Ken 617-338-0472 



7/2 



Happy Birthday 
Dob & Barbara 

from Mom ,a 



FOR SALE 



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respecitively. Complete Sets 

617-481-1579 





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Robert Mattie 
617-786-1648 



BBB 

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



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7/30 



MISCELLANEOUS 



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For top notch hunters & 
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Many more 



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com/NECAN 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-044 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 
21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy, 
MA 021 69. On the application of Costas Blathras for a Finding 
to expand the residential living use into an existing 11'x18' 
portion of the rear dwelling in violation of Title 1 7 as amended 
Chapter 1 7.24.020 (alterations, nonconforming) on the prem- 
ises numbered 37 RAWSON ROAD, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09, 7/9/09 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-046 

Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 

MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 

Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 

21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 



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Number: 1-877-281-7305 
over 1 8+ Years Only. 

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Kayak pools Looking for 
Demo Home sites SAVE 



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ROOM SET in origi- 
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Original price $3,000, 
sacrifice $975. Call Bill 
857-453-7764 

RESORT 

Boothbay Harbor, 

Maine oceanfront re- 



Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy, Ambassadorpools.com 



MA 02169. On the application of Samir Shenonda for a Vari- 
ance to construct a third story addition in violation of Title 1 7 
as amended Chapter 1 7.20.040 (dimensional) on the premises 
numbered 133 EDGEWATER DRIVE, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09, 7/9/09 



rt.^.-««. .- o sort B&B Special. 

$1500! Free Survey $i49/night, double oc- 

cupancy. June 20- July 
11. Includes breakfast, 



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CHERRY BEDROOM use of resort facilities, 

SET. Solid Wood, never kids under 10 free, 866- 

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ry boxes. English Dove- bayresort.com 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-045 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 
21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor In the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy, 
MA 02169. On the application of Ken Wong for a Finding to 
change the use from a convenient store to a learning center 
in violation of Title 17 as amended Chapter 17.24.020 (non- 
conforming structure) on the premises numbered 488-492 
HANCOCK STREET QUINCY 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 

7/2/09, 7/9/09 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-048 

Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 1 7 of the QUINCY 

MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-047 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 

MUNICIPAL CODEas amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 

Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 

21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor In the Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy, 

Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA MA 02169. On the application of Sprint Spectrum L.P. and its 

021 69. On the application of Donna Flemming for a Variance/ affiliate Clear Wireless, LLC for a Special Permit to modify its 

Finding to legalize an existing independent basement unit in existing installation to add two (2) wireless backhaul dishes 

violation of Title 17 as amended Chapter 17.16 (use regula- on the rooftop in violation of Title 17 as amended Chapter 



tions) and Chapter 17.28 (off street parking) on the premises 
numbered 265 WINTHROP STREET QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09. 7/9/09 



1 7.06.040 (wireless) on the premises numbered 1 000 SOUTH- 
ERN ARTERY QUINCY 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09, 7/9/09 



Hiir^JnlytHM Tb^'Ofttf^c^dtlA f>iig«'^Y 



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617-472-5900 

www.QuincySOIxom k 



MISC. SERVICES 



Edward A. Mcallister 

Justice OF THE Peace 

Tel.617-773-0114 
email: edmcallister@comcast.net 
www.presidentcityweddings.com 



7/2 



MORRISETTE 
LEGION POST " 

81-83 Liberty St., Quincy 

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617-770-4876 

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City & Ocean Views ^^^^ 



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Home heating repairs & service 
Radiant Floor heating 

Quincy 
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Dave 617-328-3007 

Emergencies 61 7-792-4054 
Master l.ic M 1374«y m 



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REPAIRS 

NEW INSTALLATIONS 

GAS FITTING, HEATING 



7/2 



AMERICAN LEGION POST 380 

1116 SEA STREET, QllNCY 
HALL FOR RENT 

Full Liquor License 
Kitchen Facilities available 
Contact: Functions Manager 
617-479-6149 '> 



Bearde's Gulf Station 

447 So. Artery, Quincy, MA 02169 

24 hr. Towing & Road Service, 
Lockout Service, Auto Service. 
State inspection •617-472-5818 



Save Gas & Money 
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WANTED 



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AND 

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617-733-7987 

QUINCY 



IMAGE A 
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SERVICES 



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72 



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call 774-240-7140 72 




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(617)472-3335 



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X/20 



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Page 32 Tlte Qi&incy Sxua. Thursday, July 2, 2009 




AT A RECENT meeting of the Quincy City Council, councillors honored various members of 
Quincy's public safety teams for their efforts in a March 26 fire at 100 Robertson St. From left 
to right are: Matthew Hogan, Fallon EMT-Basic; Fire Chief Joseph Barron; Fallon EMT Chad 
Costa; Fallon Paramedic Michelle Pruden; Fallon Paramedic Paul Belham; EMT Julie Pace; 
Paramedic Joshua King; Fallon Captain/Field Supervisor Cheryl Cowan; Paramedic Richard 
Centralla; Quincy Police Chief Paul Keenan; and Peter Racicot, Senior Vice President at Fallon 
Ambulance Service. 



ORGANIZERS AND VOLUNTEERS with just a few of the boxes of items collected. From left: 
Milton Republican Murray Regan; Paul Nephew, commander of the Heritage Hall American 
Legion Post; Quincy Republicans Chairwoman Jennifer Logue; and Milton Republicans Chair- 



man Richard Pilla. 



Amv Kelly Photos 



For Efforts In March 26 Fire 



Care Package Drive 
Collects Items For Troops 



Fallon Emergency Medical 
Response Team Honored 



Fallon Ambulance Ser- 
vice Paramedics and EMTs 
were honored by the City 
Quincy Council at their June 
15 meeting, for Fallon's as- 
sistance in a March 26 fire at 
100 Robertson St. 

The fire claimed the 
lives of a man and his two 
infant sons, but the man's 
wife survived the basement 
fire. Fallon's EMTs and 



Paramedics were cited for 
their bravery and efforts, as 
were members of the Quin- 
cy Police and Quincy Fire 
Departments. More than 35 
emergency personnel from 
all three departments were 
presented citations of thanks 
from the City Council. 

Peter Racicot, Senior 
Vice President at Fallon 
Ambulance, said, "We are 



Quincy Police Announce 

Guidelines For July 3rd 

Houghs Neck Celebration 



As the Independence Day 
Holiday approaches on July 
4, Police Chief Paul Keenan 
announces guidelines for the 
Houghs Neck celebration to 
be held Friday, July 3. 

Due to the heavy volume 
of vehicular and pedestrian 
traffic on many of the nar- 
row streets, extra parking 
restrictions will be in effect 
and certain areas will be 



posted "No Parking." 

In addition to motor ve- 
hicle violations, police of- 
ficers will be out enforcing 
underage drinking, open 
container violations as well 
as using or possessing ille- 
gal fireworks. 

"These steps are being 
taken so that all can enjoy 
the holiday safely. Happy 
4'** of July," Keenan said. 



very proud of the work of 
our EMTs and Paramedics. 
They are heroes who put 
their training to the test in 
life-and-death situation and 
who understand that se- 
conds count in emergency 
situations." 

He added, "We are gra- 
teful for their bravery and 
their dedication. 

"We also have a tremen- 
dous respect for the coura- 
geous work of the Quincy 
Fire and Police Departments 
and are proud to work with 
them." He continued, "One 
tragedy is one too many, but 
the residents of Quincy can 
be assured that they have a 
strong, capable emergency 
response team ready when 
needed." 

Council President Jay 
Davis was joined by other 
city councillors in making 
the presentation to Fallon's 
EMT and Paramedics, as 
well as members of the Po- 
lice and Fire Departments. 




Local residents showed 
their support for U.S. troops 
in Iraq and Afghanistan Sa- 
turday, when a care package 
drive collected scores of 
boxes of items - enough to 
assemble several hundred 
care packages for U.S. sol- 
diers. 

Organized by the Quin- 
cy and Milton Republican 
committees, the care packa- 
ge drive - held at the Heri- 
tage Hall American Legion 
Post in Milton - also collec- 
ted $1,500 in donations for 
Weymouth non-profit Care- 
Packs to help offset the cost 
of shipping the care packa- 
ges to the Middle East. 

Throughout the day, re- 
sidents streamed into the 
legion post, which donated 
the use of its facilities for 
the drive. Student volun- 
teers from Milton and Quin- 
cy helped sort and pack the 
donated items, and helped 
drum up support by holding 
signs in front of the hall. 

Donated items included 
soap, toiletries, sunscreen, 
insect repellent, clothing, 
non-perishable snacks, 

books, magazines and cards 
and letters thanking the 
troops for their service. Mil- 
ton resident John Hajjar also 
presented a donation of two 




JOHN KELLY, a student at Quincy's Beechwood Knoll Scho- 
oL helps sort items for the troops. 

dozen golf clubs on behalf items for the troops." Pilla 

of the WoIIaston Golf Club. said. "It was particularly 

Steve Doyle, executive nice to see so many kids 

director of CarePacks, said participating, and to receive 

the golf clubs will be sent assistance and support from 

to "country clubs" set up in local businesses." 



Iraq and Afghanistan that 
provide some much-needed 
"R&R" for U.S. troops. 

"This event was a great 
success," Doyle said. "We 
are so grateful to all the 
people who volunteered for 



Local organizations and 
businesses that supported the 
drive include Quincy Credit 
Union, Quincy Firefigh- 
ters Association, William J. 
Sullivan Insurance Agency, 
Fitness Unlimited, Atlan- 



helping us to let our troops tic Insurance Group, Tino's 

know they are not forgot- Pizzo, Radio Coffee House, 

ten." Montilio's and Costco. 

Quincy Republicans "We hope to make this 

chairperson Jennifer Logue drive an annual event," Lo- 

thanked the many residents, gue said. "What better way 

businesses and organiza- to celebrate American inde- 



tions that supported the col- 
lection drive. 

"It was so nice to see 
people taking time out from 
their weekend to drop off 



pendence than by thanking 
the men and women who 
put their lives on the line 
every day to preserve our 
freedom?" 



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The Quizicy 



Historic Quinc\;'s Hometown Weekly Newspaper Since 1968 




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VOL 41 No. 43 



Thursday, July 9, 2009 



A Fabuloiis Fourth 



■> 




SQUANTUM COMMUNITY YOUTH Choir won first prize for their float, "Celebrates 
Broadway" in the Squantum 100th anniversary July 4th Parade Saturday. Other photos 
from the centennial celebration appear on Page 14. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble 




MISS MERRYMOUNT - Jackie Pitts (center) was crowned Miss Merrymount at the Mer- 
rymount Fourth of July Parade Saturday. With her are attendants Jaycee Crowley (left) and 
Renee' Patten. 




MEET THE FLINTSTONES - This contingent of Merrymount residents "rocks" the Mer- 
rymount Fourth of July Parade on Chickatobot Road in their Flintstones' float. Other Mer- 
rymount Parade photos appear on Page 28. 



Business Seen 'LeveT Compared To 2008 

Surge In International 
Visitors Buoys Tourism 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

June's statistics arent 
finalized yet but the city's 
tourism business appears to 
be steady despite the sag- 
ging economy and the soggy 
spring. 

*i would say it's level or 
close to the level from last 
year," said Tourism Director 
Mark Carey, adding. "The 
international (number) is 
up" 

Carey credits the surge 



in international visitors for 
keeping the city's tourists 
spots busy and said several 
restaurants have seen an 
"uptick" in business, thanks 
to visitors from such coun- 
tries as Germany, England. 
Korea, and the Netherlands 
One restaurant ran out of 
fish and clams at the citv "s 
beachfront shops are a big 
draw, according to Carey 
who said he enjoys hearing 
the medley of languages and 



accents that's occurring in 
his office so often now 

Care\ "s assessment is 
similar to that of Caroline 
Keinalh. Deputy Superin- 
tendent of the Adams Na- 
tional Historical Park 

■The) re remaining 

similar to last \ear I'm sus- 
pecting that the_\ ha\en"t 
grown." said Keinath 

"We're seeing lots of 
families." said Marianne 

Cont'd On f'(ii.'c S 



Cahill Switches Party 
Affiliation To Independent 



By ROBERT BOS WORTH 

State Treasurer Timothy 
Cahill. who launched his 
political career as a Quincy 
city councillor 22 years ago. 
was expected in City Hall as 
early as Wednesday to of- 
ficially change his party af- 
filiation from Democrat to 
unenrolled. 

On Tuesday. Cahill - a 
longtime Democrat - said, 
"After serious consider- 
ation, I've come to the con- 
clusion that the Democratic 
Party leadership no longer 
reflects my fiscal values or 




TIM CAHILL 

those of the working fami- 
lies of the Commonwealth. 
1 believe 1 can best repre- 



sent the taxpa\ers oi the 
Commonwealth, not from 
reaching across the aisle as 
a Democrat or Republican, 
but from within the aisle 

"Later this week, 1 intend 
to register as an unenrt)lled 
independent voter, as so 
many other taxpayers have 
already done before me " 

Cahill 's decision to 
switch to independent or 
unenrolled. political observ- 
ers say. can be interpreted 
as the state treasurer's de- 
cision to challenge (jov 

Com d On Fane 2> 



Graffiti Offenders Face Crackdown 



Mayor Thomas Koch and 
Police Chief Paul Keenan 
have a warning for would- 
be graffiti artists around the 
City -you will be caught and 
you will be charged with a 
felony as part of an ongoing 
crackdown on the crime. 

"We are going to hold 
people accountable, and 



when we find them, we will 
be looking to charge offend- 
ers with a felonv, regard- 
less of how old they are." 
Keenan said. 

Police recently tiled 
criminal charges against 
three youths in connection 
with a graffiti spree in Quin- 
cy Point, and Keenan said 



investigators are actively 
pursuing leads in several 
other incidents. 

"Graffiti is a senous 
quality -of-life crime, and it 
will not be tolerated." Koch 
said "The police, under the 
leadership of Chief Keenan. 
have been extremelv vigi- 

Cont'd On fii^e S 



Library Closed Saturdays, Sundays This Summer 



Due to budget reduc- 
tions, the Thomas Crane 
Public Library, 40 Wash- 
ington St.. Quincy. will be 
closed on Saturdays and 
Sundays through Labor Day 
weekend. 



The library will reopen 
with regular hours Tuesday. 
Sept. 8. 

During the summer, the 
main library will be open 
Monday through Thursday. 
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Friday, 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



Quincv's branch librar- 
ies in Adams Shore, North 
Quincv and Wollaston will 
be open during regular Mon- 
day to Fnday hours through- 
out the summer 

For more information, 
call 617-376-1301. 




4 S 7 • "0 • 8 1 




Page 2 Tlie Qulx&cy Sun Thursday, July 9, 2009 



Open For 18,000 Senior Citizens 



Delahunt, Koch, Joe Kennedy, III Dedicate Senior Center 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

Cong. William Delahunt 
and Joseph Kennedy, ill, 
joined Mayor Thomas Koch 
in dedicating Kennedy Se- 
nior Center last Friday and, 
by Monday, the center was 
open for all. 

Council on Aging Di- 
rector Tom Clasby said the 
center was fully operating 
this week as seniors played 
volleyball in the renovated 
gymnasium while others 
trickled in to enjoy card 
games, coffee and a tour of 
the facility. 

Clasby served as master 
of ceremonies at the dedica- 
tion which opened with the 
singing of the national an- 
them by Quincy Police Sgt. 
Patrick Faherty. 

Delahunt and Kennedy 
were the featured speakers 
and each outlined the close 
ties between the Kennedy 
family, Quincy, and Koch. 

The red-headed 28-year 
old Joseph Kennedy, 111 
captivated the audience of 




MAYOR TOM KOCH speaks 
at the dedication of the city's 
new senior center named in 
honor of the Kennedy family. 

200, many of whom remem- 
bered well his late great-un- 
cle. President John F. Ken- 
nedy, and voted for another 
great uncle. Sen. Ted Ken- 
nedy. 

Kennedy is the son of 
former Congressman Jo- 
seph Kennedy, the grandson 
of the late Senator Robert 
Kennedy and the namesake 
of Joseph Kennedy, Jr., the 
Naval aviator killed on a se- 



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cret World War II mission. 

A June graduate of Har- 
vard School Law School, 
Kennedy is dipping his toes 
in political waters as an un- 
paid intern in Delahunt's of- 
fice while studying for his 
bar exam. 

The audience laughed 
as Kennedy bantered with 
Delahunt over his free labor 
and missing paychecks, then 
outlined the long "relation- 
ship between the City of 
Quincy and my family." 

Quincy is "a very special 
place," said Kennedy who 
traced the Kennedy Quincy 
connection back to World 
War I and 1918 when 
the family patriarch, Joseph 
Kennedy, ran the Fore River 
Shipyard and a Squantum 
annex for Bethlehem Steel. 

His great-grandfather 
made it the "most produc- 
tive shipyard in the country," 
said Kennedy who spoke of 
the war hero for whom he 
and his father are named. 

Less than a half mile 
from the senior center lies 
the site of the former Squan- 
tum Naval Base where Ken- 
nedy said, "My great Uncle 



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Joe learned to fly." 

Joseph Kennedy, Jr., 
was just 29 when his plane 
crashed during a sp>ecial 
mission in World War II. 
A Naval destroyer named 
in his honor was built and 
commissioned at Fore River 
in 1945. 

Kennedy praised the au- 
dience of senior citizens 
for the "tremendous lives 
you have led and all you 
have contributed." 

"There are 18,000 of us 
in this city," Delahunt said 
before lauding Koch and the 
city's efforts to offer senior 
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respect and great support." 

"I want to come here 
sometime and enjoy this 
wonderful facility. Save a 
spot for me." said Delahunt 
who is in his late 60's. 

Delahunt said he'd been 
with Senator Kennedy ear- 
lier that day and cited the 
senator's "special affection 
and love for this commu- 
nity. He obviously is facing 
a great challenge." 

For Koch, the center's 
opening represents the ful- 
fillment of a campaign prom- 
ise and a major achievement 
for his 1 8-month-old admin- 
istration. 



work for the elderly, calling 
"nothing short of miracu- 
lous, his work for the se- 
niors of this nation." 

"Everybody chipped in to 
make this happen," said 
Koch who commended 
COA Board of Directors, 
his staffers, Helen Murphy, 
Chief of Operations and 
Paul Hines, Assistant Plan- 
ner, the architectural firm of 
Jim Edwards, state legisla- 
tors, city councillors, vol- 
unteers and corporate spon- 
sors, such as Stop & Shop 
Companies, Marriott Hotel, 
and Key Office Interiors, the 
Quincy Rotary Club and pri- 
vate citizens. 

On hand for the dedica- 
tion were Sen. Michael Mor- 
rissey, Rep. Bruce Ayers and 



Koch started working for City Councillors Michael 

the city at John F. Kennedy McFarland, John Keenan, 

Health Center on Hancock Brian McNamee, Ward 6, 

Street which housed senior Kevin Coughlin, Ward 3, 

services before that building Douglas Gutro, Ward 5 , and 



which was sold to a private 
owner. 

Now, Koch said it is fit- 
ting to honor the Kenne- 
dys again through the se- 
nior center which features 
a montage of the Kennedy 
brothers in the foyer. 

Koch described Sena- 
tor Kennedy's tremendous 



Daniel Raymond!, Ward 2. 

The COA Board of Di- 
rectors are Chairman John 
Molloy, Mark Carey, John 
Chen, Jean Cristiani, Betty 
DeCristofaro, Leo Dono- 
van, Arthur Kennedy, Linda 
McPhail, Dr. Joseph Mc- 
Dermott, Frank Sweet and 
KenTarabelli. 




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Thursday. July 9, 200* Tlie Qulncy Sun Pact 3 



With Issues Of The Quincy Sun 

New Time Capsule To Be Buried 
Saturday In Abigail Adams Cairn 



Mayor Thomas Koch and 
Ward 2 Councillor Daniel 
Raymondi announced Tues- 
day that a new time capsule 
containing items from pres- 
ent-day Quincy will be bur- 
ied for a future generation 
to discover inside the newly 
restored Abigail Adams 
Cairn during a ceremony at 
1 1 a.m. on Saturday. 

Koch, Raymondi and the 
Quincy Historical Society 
will host the rededication 
at the Cairn site atop Penn's 
Hill that marks the location 
where Abigail Adams took 
young John Quincy Adams 
to watch the Battle of Bun- 
ker Hill in 1775. 

Workers performing 

emergency renovations to 
the Cairn last year discov- 



ered a time capsule bur- 
ied in.side the stone struc- 
ture that dated back to the 
Cairn's original construction 
in 1896. The time capsule 
revealed dozens of artifacts, 
including newspapers from 
the day, a parchment scroll 
signed by local dignitaries, a 
poem about Abigail Adams, 
a book offered by the Sons 
of the American Revolu- 
tion and other trinkets of the 
day. 

The new time capsule will 
be buried inside the Cairn 
and sealed as the finish- 
ing touch to the restoration 
project. Officials declined to 
reveal what would be in the 
capsule until Saturday's cer- 
emony, but confirmed that 
copies of The Quincy Sun 



WoUaston Business District 
Master Plan Topic Wednesday 



Sasaki Associates 'Intern- 
ship team were scheduled to 
make a presentation on a 
preliminary land use master 
plan for the Wollaston Busi- 
ness District Wednesday at 
5 p.m. at the Wollaston Li- 
brary, 41 Beale St. 

The team was to present 



an initial vision plan for the 
Wollaston Business Dis- 
trict. 

Mayor Tom Koch, Ward 
5 Councillor Doug Gutro 
and Planning Director Den- 
nis Harrington invited all in- 
terested parties to attend. 



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will be among the items. 

"We unearthed some 
wonderful history while try- 
ing to preserve a rich piece 
of our own history, and I am 
proud that our community 
will be leaving something 
for future generations to 
find," said Koch. "I cannot 
thank enough the Quincy 
Historical Society, Council- 
lor Raymondi and all the 
people who contributed to 
this effort." 

The Cairn underwent re- 
pairs last year after Koch and 
Raymondi worked together 
to declare its condition an 
emergency and secure fund- 
ing for the restoration. The 
Cairn was torn down and re- 
built using its original stone 
by expert masons. 

"We started this project 
largely as a public safety 
concern because of the con- 
dition of the Cairn, so I am 
thrilled that it turned into 
such a positive for the com- 
munity," said Raymondi. 




FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE - Dan Harrold, a ranger at Adams National Historical Park, 
points to the message of friendship on the bench which was sent to America from their friends 
in the Ural Mountains of Russia. Laura Gnffin Photo 

Mayor's Commission To Review Noise Issue 



Mayor Thomas Koch an- 
nounces his administration 
will embark on a full review 
of noise-related issues after 
a proposed city law to regu- 
late loudness in city neigh- 
borhoods failed to pass the 
City Council last week. 

Koch said he will appoint 
an ad-hoc Noise Commis- 
sion comprised of business 
owners and residents to re- 
view noise complaints and 
will obtain noise-measuring 
devices in an effort to obtain 



specific data on noise levels 
in city neighborhoods. 

"I am disappointed that 
a compromise on the ordi- 
nance could not be reached, 
but that does not mean we 
can not make real progress 
on this issue in the months 
ahead," Koch said. 

Koch said spending the 
summer working on the is- 
sue and gathering empin- 
cal data will be important 
should a new ordinance be 
debated by the City Council 



in the fall. 

Koch said the noise com- 
mission members would 
be a broad cross-section of 
people, from residents af- 
fected by noise issues to 
business owners who would 
be affected by any noise or- 
dinance to city officials. 

The City Council reject- 
ed a noise ordinance pro- 
posed by Ward 6 Councillor 
Brian McNamee after sev- 
eral meetings and attempts 
at compromise legislation. 



Colonial Federal 
has mortgage money 
to lend... 



In today's market, we are able to especially help. . . 

► First-time homebuyers who want a loan they 
can live with 

► Current homeowners who want to refinance 
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► Current homeowners who have a lender they're 
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Page 4 Tl^g Qiaincy Sim Thursday, July 9, 2009 



Tbe Quincy 




(USPS 453-060) 

Published Weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co., Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Robert H. Bosworth 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Boeworth, Jr. 

Founder 
1968-2009 

50c per copy $25.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$30.00 per year by mail outside Quincy - $38.00 out-of-state 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 Fax: 617-472-3963 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to: 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 021 69 

The Ouincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in 
advertisements but will reprint that pari of an advertisement In which the typographical 
error occurs 




Moments 
in time 



THE HISTORY CHANNEL 



•On July 11, 1656, Ann 

Austin and Mary Fisher, two 
Englishwomen, become the 
first Quakers to immigrate 
to Boston. Austin and Fisher, 
whose liberal teachings en- 
raged the Puritan colonial 
government, were arrested 
and jailed. After five years in 
prison, they were deported. 

• On July 8, 1776, in 
Philadelphia, the Liberty Bell 
rings out from the tower of 
the Pennsylvania State House 
(now known as Independence 
Hall), summoning citizens to 
the first public reading of the 
Declaration of Independence. 
Though the document was 
adopted by delegates on July 
4, the Liberty Bell was not 
rung until the Declaration of 
Independence returned from 
the printer on July 8. 

•On July 9, 1877, the All 

England Croquet and Lawn 
Tennis Club begins its first 
lawn tennis tournament at 
Wimbledon. The Wimble- 
don Championship is the 
only major tennis event still 
played on grass. 

• On July 7, 1928, the 

Chrysler Corporation intro- 
duces the Plymouth as its 
newest car. With a delivery 
price of $670, the Plymouth 
was an attractive buy, selling 
more than 80,000 units in its 
first year. 



• On July 6, 1942, in 

Nazi-occupied Holland, 13- 
year-old Jewish diarist Anne 
Frank and her family are 
forced to take refuge in a se- 
cret sealed-off area of an Am- 
sterdam warehouse, where 
they hide for two years. "The 
Diary of Anne Frank" has 
served as a literary testament 
to the 6 million Jews, includ- 
ing Anne herself, who were 
silenced in the Holocaust. 

• On July 12, 1962, at the 

Marquee Club in London, 
the Rolling Stones give their 
first public performance. The 
rock band's name came from 
a Muddy Waters song. Al- 
though now in their 60s, the 
Rolling Stones continue to 
tour, playing sold-out shows 
around the world. 

• On July 10, 1992, the 

Alaska court of appeals over- 
turns the conviction of Joseph 
Hazelwood, the former cap- 
tain of the oil tanker Exxon 
Valdez. Hazelwood had been 
found guilty of negligence 
for his role in the massive oil 
spill in Prince William Sound 
in 1989. The Exxon Valdez, 
renamed Sea River Medi- 
terranean, still transports 
oil, but is legally prohibited 
from entering Prince William 
Sound. 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



Internet Index Expanded 
At Registry Of Deeds 



Norfolk County Register 
of Deeds William G'Donnell 
announces the expansion of 
the internet accessible land 
records research available 
at the Norfolk County Reg- 
istry of Deeds at www.nor- 
folkdeeds.org. 

The ongoing project has 
extended and made avail- 
able all recorded land in- 
dexes and images from 1954 
back to and including 1947. 
"Recorded land records 
are referenced by a book 
and page number based on 
the traditional Common 
Law recording system," 
G'Donnell said. "This proj- 
ect has added online indexes 
back to 1 947 and has greatly 
enhanced our current inter- 



net accessible library. 

"This is a real benefit for 
the practitioner and con- 
sumer alike as indexed re- 
cords are the primary way to 
locate an applicable, but un- 
determined, book and page 
reference," O'Donnell said. 

The next phase of the ex- 
pansion will take the online 
indexing capacity back to 
the year 1911. 

"Our goal is to bring the 
Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds into the homes, mu- 
nicipalities and businesses 
of Norfolk County and to 
improve the usefulness of 
the system to both real es- 
tate professionals and the 
general public," O'Donnell 
added. 




Mayoral Preliminary Brewing? 




KOCH 



PHELAN 



The city' election calendar - to borrow a horse- 
racing term - is coming down the home stretch 
in terms of filing nomination papers. 

The last day and hour to submit nomination papers 
for certification to the Board of Registrars is Tuesday, 
Aug. 4 at 5 p.m. That's less than four weeks for po- 
tential candidates for mayor, councillor at-large, ward 
councillor and school committee to submit at least 50 
valid signatures. 

At this point, some 26 citizens have pulled papers 
for various offices in Quincy. And the prospects ap- 
pear pretty good there will be a preliminary election 
for mayor, school committee and Ward 4 councillor. 

In fact, the best 
chance for a pre- 
liminary may be in 
the race for mayor 
which is heating up 
between incumbent 
Tom Koch, who is 
seeking a second 
term, and former 

Mayor William Phelan, whom Koch unseated two 
years ago. Phelan announced his bid to win back the 
mayor's office in early June after exploring a potential 
candidacy earlier in the spring. 

Both Koch and Phelan have officially declared their 
candidacies and have held fundraisers to fuel their 
campaign war chests. 

So while the Koch-Phelan rematch stands to be the 
main bout this fall, the question remains if there will 
be other contenders on the mayoral card. 

As of Tuesday, three other potential candidates have 
pulled papers for mayor, according to the City's Elec- 
tion Department. 

And one of those would-be candidates says he is 
very serious about joining Koch and Phelan to force a 
preliminary election Tuesday, Sept. 22. 

Joseph O'Malley, 43, of 63 Island Ave., told The 
Sun he intends to campaign for the city's highest elect- 
ed office. 

"I will absolutely and positively collect enough sig- 
natures (to qualify for the ballot.) There's no doubt in 
my mind. I'm even going to ask Koch and Phelan to 
sign them," O'Malley said. 

"I'm serious about becoming a candidate. I am an 
exasperated taxpayer. My taxes keep going up and city 
services keep going down. I'm curious about where all 
our tax money is going." 

O'Malley is a letter carrier in Weymouth. He moved 
to Quincy six years ago. He also took papers out to 
run for mayor in 2005 but did not retum them. That 
was the year Phelan, mnning for a second term, was 
challenged by Ward 6 Councillor Joseph Newton and 
Quincy businessman Harvey Kertzman. 

But, O'Malley says, this year may be different. "I'm 
serious about running and I think I'm a level-headed 
guy. I'm just a frustrated taxpayer who believes resi- 
dents deserve a better choice than Koch and Phelan for 
mayor." 

The other two potential candidates who have pulled 
papers for mayor are Christopher Clark, age 42, of 359 
East Squantum St., who is a disc jockey for CBS radio; 
and Charles Dennehey, age 61 , of 610 Willard St., who 
lists his occupation as a driver. 

Dennehey pulled papers for mayor in 2005 and 
2007 but did not retum them. 

So, taking papers out doesn't necessarily mean 
those papers will be returned. 

But if just one other person submits papers for 
mayor and joins Koch and Phelan, then a preliminary 
election would be held Sept. 22 to pare the number 
of mayoral contenders to two. The winners Sept. 22 



would square off in the final election Nov. 3. 

G 

THE POTENTIAL FIELD for school committee is 
up to eight as four more would-be candidates have in- 
dicated their intentions to seek one of the three seats 
that are up this year. 

Two of those seats are open because current School 
Committeemen Ron Mariano and Nick Puleo are not 
seeking election this fall. 

Mariano, who is also a state representative, was 
named Assistant Majority Leader in the House of Rep- 
resentatives in February. He took himself out of the 
school race in early May so that he could focus on his 
legislative duties and additional responsibilities as as- 
sistant majority leader. 

Two weeks later, Puleo pulled out of the school 
race. He's decided to pursue a master's degree from 
Boston College on a scholarship studying ethics and 
the relationship between politics and religion. 

So, the only sitting School Committee member who 
will appear on this year's ballot is incumbent Anne 
Mahoney, age 43, of 12 Ferriter St., who announced 
her candidacy for a second four-year term last month. 

The latest entrants into the field are: 

Maureen Ann Durkin, age 52, of 125 Colonial Dr, 
a registered nurse; Michael Covais, age 5 1 , of 23 Pope 
St., a local attorney; Charles Adam Holtz, age 32, of 
40 Richie Rd., a school teacher; and Barbara Isola, age 
52, of 34 Randlett St., an assistant district attorney in 
Plymouth County. 

All four have pulled papers as of Tuesday, accord- 
ing to the city's Election Department. 

Covais ran four years ago for school committee. 
Durkin, Holtz and Isola would be making their first 
runs for public office in Quincy. 

The other three candidates for School Conmfiittee, 
all of whom declared their candidacies months ago, 
and have pulled papers, are: 

Karl Roos, age 41, of 8 Park St., who works in the 
pharmaceutical industry; Matthew Lockwood Mul- 
laney, 39, of 180 Glendale Rd., a market manager for 
Harvard Pilgrim's Massachusetts business; and Re- 
becca Mc Williams, 26, of 24 Newcomb St., a licensed 
architect. 

Seven candidates would be required for a school 
committee preliminary election. The top six candi- 
dates in the preliminary would vie for the three seats 
in the final election Nov. 3. 

Q 

IN WARD 4, incumbent councillor Jay Davis has 
at least one challenger: First-time candidate Brian Pal- 
mucci, age 31, of 138 Willard St., has already submit- 
ted enough signatures to qualify for the city election. 

Davis, a local attorney and current city council 
president, is seeking a fourth two-year term. Palmucci 
is a prosecutor for the State Department of Correction. 
He served on the Pembroke School Committee before 
moving to Quincy. 

But a third candidate may be jumping into the Ward 
4 race. Michael O'Connell, age 61, of 35 Ridge way 
Ln., has taken papers out. O'Connell is a lifelong 
Quincy resident and active in local youth hockey. He 
too would be a first-time candidate. 

a 

POLITICAL JUNKIES should circle another date 
on the city's election calendar: Monday, Sept. 14 at 5 
p.m. is the last day and hour for all candidates to file 
campaign finance reports with the City Clerk. Reports 
would indicate what money candidates have raised 
and spent from Jan. 1 through Aug. 31 of this year. 
Election observers believe a candidate's ability to raise 
money is a good barometer of support and potential 
success at the ballot box. 



Thursday, July 9, 2009 The Qiaincy Sw> Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 



Hancock Square, Quincy, Mass 




THIS 1908 POSTCARD shows Hancock Street looking 
south from Granite Street towards School Street. The 
only visible building in this view that is still extant is 
the large Durgin and Merrill block on the right. Built in 
1885, it was the second building in Quincy Center built 
with red bricks. Today its facade is covered with siding. 
The Greenleaf building just out of sight on the right was 
I built 10 years before. In 1915, the dirt roadway shown 



here was widened to 80 feet and paved with granite 
cobblestones. It was resurfaced with bituminous con- 
crete in 1920. Sanborn and Damon's Hardware store on 
the left was located here for over 60 years. On the street 
level at the right was the Quincy Department Store. To 
contact Tom Galvin, e-mail tmgalvin@verizon.net. 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Neighborhood Meeting Today On West Quincy Car Wash 



Ward 4 City Councillor 
Jay Davis will host a neigh- 
borhood meeting today 
(Thursday) regarding the 
late-night hours of opera- 
tion of the Super Clean Car 
Wash located at the intersec- 
tion of Copeland and Miller 
Streets in West Quincy. 

The meeting will be held 
today (Thursday) at 12:30 
p.m. in the Community 
Room of the Drohan Apart- 
ment Building at 170 Cope- 



land St. 

Davis said he has re- 
ceived complaints from 
neighbors regarding late- 
night activity taking place at 
the car wash. 

"It amazes me that busi- 
ness such as this are allowed 
to operate at all hours of the 
night without being held 
accountable," Davis said. 
The car wash was recently 
renovated and installed a car 
vacuum within feet of the 



Drohan Apartments, which 
houses a number of elderly 
residents. 

Because of the late-night 
activity of the business, Da- 
vis said he has requested that 
the licensing board investi- 
gate the matter and have the 
owners of the car wash ap- 
pear before the board. 

"There are no employ- 
ees at the business and the 
sign on the d(K>r directs one 
to call a Weymouth phone 



number," Davis said. "It ir- 
ritates me beyond belief that 
we have worked so hard to 
attract responsible business- 
es to West Quincy and we 
still have some businesses 
that could care less about 
working with neighbors." 

The meeting will allow 
neighbors to air their con- 
cerns, which in turn with 
be presented to the License 
Board. For more informa- 
tion, call 617-834-3945. 



Readers Forum 



Thanks Glennon, DriscoU Families For Volunteerism 



On June 6, the Squantum itude to Erin Glennon and 

Community Youth Choir Meghan Driscoll, as well as 

performed Annie Jr. at the their team of helpers. They 

Cove Auditorium. I wanted did an amazing job with the 

to express my sincerest grat- kids as well as all of the be- 

Darfur Project Raises 
In Donations 



hind the scenes things that 
make a show great! 

Their hard work and 
dedication to the children 



community service. 

I was so impressed with 
the dedication the Glennon 
and Driscoll families show 



Quincy' s 
Yesterdays 




Thomas McHugh 
Fifth Mayoral Candidate 



This Week 

1977 

32 Years Ago 



$600 



Several months ago, 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church collected 
donations for CooKits to 
help the women of Darfur, 
and a number of our fellow 
Quincy citizens sent dona- 
tions. 

In my letter thanking 
them, the amount raised was 
incorrect. 

Shortly after I sent in my 
letter, 1 was informed that 
the total amount raised was 
$600 - double the amount 1 
had initially reported. Isn't 
that wonderful? 

Again, thank you to ev- 
eryone who helped Quincy 
Community United Meth- 
odist Church with the Dar- 
fur Project. 



Rev. Dr. Susan F. 
Jarek-Glidden, Pastor 



in our community is to be our community through their 

commended. In a day when volunteerism with this en- 

so many negative influences deavor. Thank you to Erin, 

are at the disposal of our Meghan, and the Driscoll 

young people it's refreshing and Glennon Families for 

when there are groups such shanng your countless tal- 

as this that promote positive ents with us. 
outlets for the kids to ex- Quincy is a better place 

press themselves as well as because of people like you. 

Ann Marie Burke 



Quincy Community teaching them the spirit of 
United Methodist Church 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■■ 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



I 1 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
1 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 I ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
I 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 



By FRANK McCAULEY 

Ihe preliminary election is still some 10 weeks awas 
but there are already five candi- ____«« 
dates in the race for mavor plus 
contests for all seats on the city 
council except for the one in Ward 
Ih ree . ^^^^^^^^^^ 

The live mayoral candidates 
are: Incumbent Mayor Joseph J. LaRaia. Council Presi- 
dent Arthur H. Tobin. attorney Ihomas Barron, attornev 
George Tull and Thomas McHugh. 

SHEA THINKS CITY HALL 
ADDITION FEES A LITTLE HKJH' 
City Auditor Charles Shea has signed contracts total- 
ing $435,000 with an Architect and Construction Man- 
agement firm involved in the proposed city hall addition 
even though he feels the sum is "a little high." Shea said 
the architect's contracts totaled S227,(K)0 while the con- 
struction management contracts totaled $208,000. 

QUINCYISMS 
Mrs. Anneli Johnson and Mrs. Constance Stok- 
inger were elected to the Board of Directors of the 
Blue Hills Girl Scout Council... The "Let's Have Fun" 
Nursery School, 857 Hancock St.. Joan Picard. Direc- 
tor, was taking applications for September enrollment. 
Susan Callahan, 54 Lenox St . and Brian Murphy. 33 
Pawsey St. both of Houghs Neck, received American Le- 
gion Awards from Mary Timcoe. Commander, of the 
Houghs Neck Legion Post 380. The annual awards are 
given to two ninth-grade students for outstanding schol- 
arship, service and leadership. . . Quincy School Admin- 
istrators William Phinney and Richard Crystal were 
selected to attend a weeklong seminar on Critical Issues 
in Education, sponsored by the Institute for Development 
of Educational Activities in Dayton. Ohio... The Eighth 
Annual Sidewalk Bazaar was scheduled for Thursday. 
Friday and Saturday. July 14-16, The Miss Quincv Bay 
Beauty Pageant was scheduled for 9:30 p.m.. Fnda>. 
July 15 in front of Hancock Bank. . Kenneth P. Fallon 
was installed as president of the Quinc> Rotarv' Club 
for the year. June 1977-1978.. [he pinning ceremon> 
for 32 graduates of the Quincy Vocational -Technical 
School's Practical Nursing Program was scheduled lor 
Friday, July 15 at Broadmeadt)\vs Junior High School... 
Thomas M. McDonald. 24 Vershire St.. North Quincy. 
was elected State Junior Vice-(\immander of the .Mas- 
sachusetts Department of Veterans of Foreign Wars at the 
VFW Convention held in Springfield. . . Quincy residents 
Robert Curtis. 66 Ruggles St . Robert C. Greenblatt. 
422 Washington St.. both of Quincy Point, and Marie 
Keene, 102 Summit Ave. WoUaston. received Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy degrees frtim the Massachu- 
setts College of Pharmacy . . ■ Senator Arthur H. Tobin 
(D-Quincy) successfully sponsored an amendment to 
the State budget, which would provide $15 million to 
reimburse municipal hospitals for services to welfare 
patients. The legislation would benefit the Quinc\ City 
Hospital... Four top students gave speeches at Central 
Junior High School's final assembly. They included Elon 
Ezickson. John Kavanaugh. Thomas Rand and Mi- 
chael Ricciuti... Two Quincy students were named to 
the Dean's List at Bowdoin College, Brunswick. Maine. 
They are Carl L. Leininen. 8 South Junior Terrace. 
South Quincy and Christopher M. Toy. 79 Roberts St.. 
also of South Quincy. Both students were members of 
the senior class Congressman James A. Burke (D- 
Milton) was resting at home follow ing an eight-da> slay 
at Bethesda Naval Hospital for treatment of an infected 
foot. . . Paul D. Connor, Jr.. was installed as Commander 
of the Robert I. Nickerson Post #382 in Squantum. Fhe 
installation ceremonies were held at the post home. 20 
Moon Island Rd. Squantum. . The Peking Kitchen, (^hi- 
nese Food Take Out Only. 501 Washington St . Qumcy 
Point, was offering "Luncheon Special . S 1 55" . Quinc\ 
Lions Club members Arthur Gillis and Edward Den- 
neen recently participated in a Claucoma Clinic at the 
John F. Kennedy Health Center. Hancock St.. Quincy... 
Motobecomes Bicycle. 148 Parkingwav. Quincy Center, 
was offering '"Motobecomes, World's #1 Motorized Bi- 
cycle for as low as $319." 



Page 6 Tlie QiUncy Sun Thursday, July 9, 2009 



Arts & Ertertairnert 




Open House Saturday At 
Dorothy Quincy Homestead 



The Dorothy Quincy 
Homestead, a National 
Historic Landmark, will be 
open for public tours Satur- 
day, July 1 1 , between 1 and 
4 p.m. 

Tours will start on the 
hour and half hour begin- 
ning at 1 p.m. The last tour 
begins at 3:30 p.m. 

All tours are free, but a 
voluntary contribution is 
suggested. 



The Homestead is located 
on Butler Road at the comer 
of Hancock St., Quincy. 

Dating from 1686, the 
house is 322 years old. Dur- 
ing the 17th and 1 8th centu- 
ries, this mansion was con- 
sidered the grandest estate 
in Quincy. During the Revo- 
lutionary War era, it was a 
meeting place for such pa- 
triots as Josiah Quincy, John 
Hancock and John Adams. It 



was the childhood home of 
Dorothy Quincy Hancock, 
the wife of John Hancock. 

The Homestead is operat- 
ed by the Colonial Dames of 
Massachusetts in conjunc- 
tion with the Massachusetts 
Department of Conservation 
and Recreation (DCR). 

Additional public open 
house dates this season are 
Saturdays Aug. 1 and 22, 
Sept. 12 and Oct. 3. 



Taddle For The Environment' 
Features Canoe, Kayak Races 



QUINCY GIRL SCOUT Troop 74109 recently participated in the Girl Scouts' Babypalozza 
event at Cradles to Crayons. From left to right are: Ashleigh Wilson, Haly Di Cristofaro, Kas- 
sandra Dineen, Lauren Lo, and Nicole Sullivan. The girls collected baby items to be donated 
to Cradles to Crayons. Ashleigh Wilson and Lauren Lo also completed their Girl Scout Bronze 
Award project which is the highest honor a Junior Girl Scout can achieve. 

Free Screening Of ^Maxed Out' 
At Crane Library July 13 



Lunch will be provided for 
each participant. 

Those attending the fund- 
raiser are also invited to at- 
tend an aftertoon of family 
day Saturday, activities featuring the New 
England Aquarium's Touch 
Tank and guided tours of 



The Thomas Crane Pub- 
lic Library, 40 Washington 
St., Quincy Center, will host 
a free screening of the 2007 
documentary film "Maxed 
Out" Monday, July 1 3 . 

With coverage that spans 



from small American towns 
all the way to the White 
House, the film shows how 
the modem financial indus- 



us why the poor are getting 
poorer while the rich are 
getting richer. 

After the film, Financial 



the true definition of 
ferred customer" and 



Hgg 



pre- 
tells 

ii 




JOAN'S OLYMPIC GYM 

GYMNASTICS & D/VNCE SCHOOL 

WAS VOTED # 1 ON THE SOUTH SHORE 
Ages 2 - Adult gT 

NOW ACCEPTING 
SUMMER & FALL 
REGISTRATIONS! 

^ 781-843-9624 



"An Excellent Education 
Environment For Your Child" 



197 Quincy Avenue, Braintree ■ wvvw.joansolympicgym.com 



try really works, explains Literacy Coordinator Isaisas 

Sarmiento will share some 
resources about proper cred- 
it card use, credit counseling 
and debt management. 

The 90-minute film, writ- 
ten and directed by James D. 
Scurlock, is not rated. 

This is the first in a series 
of financial literacy presen- 
tations sponsored by the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary and Quincy Commu- 
nity Action Programs, Inc. 

For more information, 
call 617-376-1301. 



MB 



V 



4. 



The Quincy Environ- 
mental Network will host its 
first annual "Paddle for the 
Environment" fundraiser 
and environmental treasure 
awareness 
July 1 1 . 

The event will be held 
from noon to 4:30 p.m. at 
the Recreation Boathouse 
on Black's Creek behind 
Pageant Field in Quincy. 
Activities include canoe/ 
kayak races and family fun. 

The QEN is looking for 
both individuals and teams 
(3, 4, and 6 person crews) 
to Race for the Environment 
at Black's Creek. An entry 
fee of $20 per person will 
be charged for each entrant. 



The Quincy Environ- 
mental Network is an active 
organization that strives to 
coordinate and encourage 
the efforts of those who are 
concerned about, or have a 
responsbility to, the envi- 
ronment, in order to advo- 



Black's Creek sponsored cate for its protection and 
by the Department of Con- restoration. It is a public 



servation and Recreation 
(DCR). Additional activities 
are planned. 

A cookout is also planned 
(at minimal cost) for all ca- 
tered by Eating Healthy. 

The QEN thanks the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment and Quincy Police 
Department for their help in 
organizing this event. 



volunteer organization that 
encourages open participa- 
fion by all . 

Recent efforts include a 
series of educational semi- 
nars relating to wind power 
and the first annual Environ- 
mental Fair held at St. Ann's 
Church in April. 

For more information, 
call 617-877-5975. 



Tireworks, Color And Light' Photo Exhibit 

Quincy 



Need Time to Yourself? 



Retreat at 
Atria Marina Place offers: 

• Short-term assisted living 

• Wellness staff on call 24 hours 

every day, should an emergency arise 

• The same amenities as a full-time 

resident, including events, nutritious 

meals and scheduled transportation 



Quincy resident Richard Washington St. 
DeLeonardis is exhibiting Center, 
his photography through The exhibit features 

July 31 intheColetti Read- photographs of fireworks, 
ing Room of the Thomas landscapes and panoramas. 

Various exposure times and 
camera movements pro- 
duced images of fireworks 
with slight quirks, and tech- 



Crane Public Library, 40 

Children Ceramic 
Classes Offered 



niques such as HDR (high 
dynamic range) and blend- 
ing utilities were used to 
create landscape and pan- 
orama shots with intense, 
emotional color and refined 
detail. 

For more informafion, 
call 617-376-1301. 



E & T Ceramics of Wol- 
laston will offer summer 
children's ceramic classes 
Wednesday and Thursday 
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 
their new location, 367 Bill- 
ings Rd. 



Classes include paints, 
brushes and firing (piece ad- 
ditional). 

Space is limited. Call 
617-479-4107 for more in- 
formation. 



Senior Scrabble Every Monday 

Elderiy devotees of the comer of Channing Street. 



game 'Scrabble" meet ev- 
ery Monday from 12 to 3:30 
p.m. at the Dawes House on 
Quincy Shore Drive at the 



Beginners are welcome. 
For more information, 
call 617-376-1506. 




ATRIA MARINA PLACE 

Four Seaport Drive 

North Quincy, Massachusetts 

617.770.3264 

www.atriarrmrinaplace . com 



14th Annual ^^^ 

ARTS HFFAIR 



AT MARINA BAY 



nd 



August 1** - 2 

Saturday, 10-8pm 
Sunday, 10-5pm 

Judging Saturday: 10:00-Noon 
Awards Ceremony: 2:00 in the Cafeteria 
Categories include: 

• Oil and Acrylic • Photography 

• Watercolor • Mixed Media 

• Drawing • Sculpture 




Exhibition features members of 14 Art Associations: 



Braintree 
Brockton COA 
Canton 
Hull Artists 
Studio Connection 
Hyde Park 

Independent South Shore 
Artists Circle (formerly 
Brockton Artist's Circle) 



Milton Art Museum 

Needham 

Norwood 

Quincy 

South Boston 

So. Shore Arts Center 

West Roxbury 

Weymouth 



I la) 735-35437 




Free Parking • Free Admission • Raffles • Art Demonstrations www.artsaffair.org 

Marina Bay Corporate Park, 500 Victory Rd., Marina Bay, Quincy • Cafeteria, Lobby and Outdoors. 



Hundreds of works of art, fourteen local art associations, one great spot. 



Ihursdav, Julv 9, 2009 The Qxiixtcy Sim Page 7 



QHS Class Of 1954 
Planning 55th Reunion 



The Quincy High School 
Class of 1954, will have 
its 55th reunion Sept. 10 
from 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. at 
the Neighborhood Club, 27 
Glendale Rd. 

The day after the reunion. 
On Sept. 1 1 , a luncheon will 
be held from 11 a.m. to 3 
p. m. at the Quincy Yacht 
Club, (Houghs Neck) 1310 
Sea St. Tickets are $60 per 
person . 

Checks can be mailed to 
John Murphy. 186 Palmer 
St., Quincy, MA 02 169 

The committee is search- 
ing for the following class- 
mates: 

They are: Alii Aho Cully, 
Marilyn Arthur DeGrego- 
rio, Edward Averill, Henry 
Barbour, Donald Beckett, 
Edward Bethiaime, Donald 
Bertoli, William Bosshardt, 
William Brown, Robert 
Campbell, John Carter, Da- 
vid Chamberlain, Frances 
Coury, Lawrence Crawford, 
James Curry , Peter DeBruyn , 
Nick Denaro, Geraldine 
Devine McDonnell, Marion 
Dixon O'Connor, Frank 
Finley, Jean Ford Matatall, 
Kathleen Fruth Cunningham 
, William J. Greene, Loretta 
Hadlock Woodhead. 

Also. J. Richard Hannan, 
Bruce R. Harvester. Ronald 



Hatcher, Mary Henneber- 
ry Cleary, Anne Higgins 
Kneizys, James Kelley, Paul 
Koski, Lorraine MacKinnon 
Andrews, Inez McPhee Se- 
lipo, John Martin, Bernard 
Matterazzo, Mary McCabe 
Pracock, Richard Miller, 
Beverly Morrison. 

Also. Arthur Perette, 
Robert Queenan, John Rii- 
himaki, William Riihima- 
ki, Paula Rioux Seyfried, 
John Robinson, Edward 
Rumpj, Paul Scolamiero, 
Carol Sealund Reed, Rob- 
ert Smith, Robert Sprague, 
Gary Stella, Margaret Strum 
Kadinger, Joseph Sulli- 
van, Richard Talbot, Justin 
Thomas Bouchette, Edith 
Tuomela Grasselli. Anne 
Voipe Omera, Donald Whit- 
termore, Winifred Willey. 
Kenneth Bennett, Lois Bur- 
rell, Judith Cole Page. Rich- 
ard Johnson. Ellen Keefe 
Lyons, Brenda Josephine 
Lumey, William Mattson, 
Maureen Mattes Gravina, 
Meraline Mezzitti, Marjorie 
Milne Surette, Sandra Owen 
Gill, Janet Pizzi Daly, John 
Robinson, Robert Zinck, 
Joan Mahoney, Aame Har- 
tikka. 

For more information, 
call John Murphy at 617- 
479-3570. 



Foreign Film Screening Tonight 



The award-wmning 

Czech film "The Country 
Teacher" will be shown to- 
night (Thursday) at 7 p.m. 
at the Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington St., 
Quincy Center. 

The 113-minute film is 



not recommended for ages 
under 17 without parental 
permission. 

It will be shown in Czech 
with English subtitles. 

For more information, 
call 617-376-1301. 



Temple Shalom Sponsoring 
Canoe Trip July 18 



Rabbi Fred "Oar Cha- 
dash" Benjamin of Temple 
Shalom of Milton will lead 
a guided Moonlight Ca- 
noe and Kayak Tnp on the 
Charles River Saturday. July 
18 from 9: 15 to 10:55 p.m., 
as part of a Jewish activity 
and recreation program this 
summer called "Bikes and 
Chai-kes." 

The program is mostly 
aimed at families with young 
children, and is supported 



by a grant from Combined 
Jewish Philanthropies. 

This particular event is 
for adults only and includes 
a Havdallah service and 
nosh. 

The trip departs from 
Charles River Canoe and 
Kayak in Newton, with a 
maximum of 40 people. 

For information about 
cost, to register and for 
more information, call 617- 
698-3394. 



Sccial 




'Gran Torino' Movie At 
Crane Library July 16 



The 2(K)X film "f Jran lo- 
nno" will be shown Ihurs- 
day. Jul) 16 at 7 pm at 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library. 40 Washington St.. 
Quincy Center. 

Directed by Clint East- 
wood, the 116-minute film 
is rated R for language 



lence 

It stars Clint hastwood. 
Bee Vang. Ahne> Her. and 
Christopher Carley 

Ihe screening is spon- 
sored b\ the Friends of the 
Ihomas Crane Public Li- 
brarv Por more information. 
cair6 17-376- 130 1 



KIMBERLY WELCH and SCJT. JASON RACE 

Quincy Wedding Ceremony 

For U.S. Soldier, Fiancee 

On Independence Day 



throughout, and some vio- 

John Quincy Adams Birthday 
Celebration July 11 At Peace Field 



A U.S. soldier and his 
Braintree fiancee made the 
most of his two-week leave 
on July 4. when they wed 
in an impromptu outdoor 
ceremony on Independence 
Day. 

Sgt. Jason Race, a Whit- 
man native, married his fi- 
ancee. Kimberly Welch, at 
a brief, outdoor ceremony 
in the picturesque Quincy 
marshes near Wollaston 
Beach. 

The wedding was offici- 
ated by Quincy Justice of 
the Peace Michelle Lydon, 
who performed the ceremo- 
ny for free. 

"It's the least 1 could do 
on Independence Day for a 
young man who has served 
his country." said Lydon. 
who noted that Race, cur- 
rently stationed at Fort 
Drum in New York, has al- 
ready served two tours of 
duty in Iraq. 

"1 considered it an honor 
and a privilege to partici- 
pate in this ceremony on 
the Fourth of July," Lydon 
added. 

Welch, the owner of 
Our Magical Beginnings 
preschool centers in East 
Bridgewater and Norton, 
found herself scrambling 
to pull together a wedding 
ceremony after Race pro- 
Daniel Munkley 
On Dean's List 

Daniel Munkley of Quin- 
cy, was named to the Dean's 
List for the Spring semester 
at Quinnipiac University, 
New York. 



posed June 26 while home 
on leave. 

"We've been dating for 
just over a year, but we've 
known each other for years.' 
Welch said. "July Fourth 
was the only day during 
Jason's leave that all of our 
parents could be there, so 1 
googled 'Quincy Justice of 
the Peace' and found Mi- 
chelle." 

Welch's sons. Troy, and 
Evan. 8. also attended the 
wedding ceremony along 
with a small contingent of 
close family friends. Fol- 
lowing the informal cer- 
emony, the couple and their 
children departed for a hon- 
eymoon camping trip to 
Point Sebago. Maine. 

"1 think the Fourth of JuK 
is an awesome anniversary 
date," Welch said. "And I 
can be sure that Jason will 
never forget it'" 



The QHS Football Alumni Association 

will be hosting its 2nd Annual Fundralsing Event 

WHEN: Wed., July 15, 2009, 6:00 p.m. WHERE: The Water Club@Marina Bay 
DONATION: $20 at the door— Dinner Buffet included 

(must be 21 or older to atter)d) 

Please join us to support this i^ear's team. 
There will be food courtesi; of Siro's, drink, music and raffle prizes: 

Ray Bourquc Autographed Hockey Stick ~ Kevin Faulk 16x20 
Autographed Photo ~ Tim Thomas 8x10 Autographed Photo ~ Jason Varitek 

Autographed Baseball ~ 2 Pairs of Red Sox Tickets & More... 

// ^u cannot attend, but would still like to support the team, please mail donations to. 

Coach Bill Rcardon, Quincy High School, Guidance Department, 

52 Coddington Street, Quincy MA 02169 

Make checks payable to. Quincy High School 



The celebration of the 
232nd birthday of John 
Quincy Adams, and por- 
trayed by Jim Cooke) will 
be held at 12 noon. Satur- 
day. July 11 at the Carnage 

Sarah Goreham Graduates Clark U. 

A North Qui PC \ High 



House in Peace Field. 135 
Adams St 

Cooke will serve a slice 
of birthdav cake to all w o 
attend the free festivities. 



Sarah H. Cjoreham ot 
Quincy. graduated summa 
cum laude from Clark Ini- 
versity. Worcester vsith a 
bachelor of arts degree. 



School graduate. Cjoreham 
is a member ot the Fiat Lux 
and Lambda Pi Lta. the na- 
tional communication honor 
society 

Caroline Thorpe On Suffolk Dean*s List 



Caroline Thorpe of 
Quincy. a freshman mar- 
keting major in the Sawver 
Business School Honors 



Program, has been named 
to the Dean's List at Suffolk 
Iniversitv for the fall and 
spnng semesters 



;f:«'> : «'■»:'»»> 



-: -»>»x>0O':«>>^< ' 



„ V-'rf'-' ---'** .^'«''' • 




\i^SVdcjUt 



1^ 

Se.-.ng & Des^g" StudiC 

215SAMOSET Ave. 

QlIN( Y 



Kids Summer 

Sewing & 

Fashion 

Design Programs 



Begins July 6, 2009 

Call 617-770-1267 

or register at 
www.institchesewlng.com 





JEWELRY 



LYCOLSOn 

I'ine Jeirelry 



795 HANCOCK ST., (Hancock & Clay Sts ) 617-786-7942 

JULY BIRTHSTONE is RUBY 
- Handicapped Accessible - 



RELIGIOUS ITEMS 



Unitv Candles 



RKLI(;iOliS 
ARIICLES 



25 BEALE STREET 
Mon - Sat 9:30ain - 6:30pm 



/ t ^■• 

CREEDS 
CROSSING 



Rosary Beads 



BOOKS* GIFTS r 
Nll'SlC • BIBLES I 



WOLLASTON 

(617)471-0990 



SOCIAL CENTER 



SONS OF ITALY 

Social Center 

1 20 Quarr> Street, Quincy 
Function Halls Available for all your Special Needs. 
Call about our Wedding Packages... 
617-472-5900 www Quinc> SOI.com 



SEE YOUR AD HERE!!! 



If you would like to see your ad here, 
please call 617-471-3100 



FLORISTS 



Quint's House 
of Flowers 

Family Owned & Operated 

since 1919 

761 SO. ARTERY. QUINCY 

617-773-7620 



FUNCTION HALL 



THE TIRRELL 
ROOM 

Ql INCY ELKS 

As advertised in 
Nev\ England Bnde 

www.thetirrellroom.com 

Weddings * Banquets * 

Showers * Birthdays * 

All Occasions 

254 Quarrv St . Quincy 

617-847-6149 



TUXEDOS 



TUMEDO TIME 

I-OKMAINVKAK 

I m^ 

i Every Tuxedo 

2 Elm St.. Braintree Square 

781-848-9077 

TuxedoTi me com 



Page 8 The Qi&iz&cy Siui Thursday, July 9, 2009 



Surge In International M[arie*'s 



Visitors Buoys Tourism 



Kitctliieii 



Com d From Page I 

Peak, superintendent at the 
Adams site. 

"It's great to see full trol- 
leys" 

Peak said that even thun- 
der and lightning didn't de- 
ter some of the park's hardy 
visitors. "Despite the weath- 
er, they didn't retreat." 

Keeping level is a ma- 
jor accomplishment in this 
economy. according to 
Carey who said the city's 
doing much better than the 
state this year and noted that 
other tourist bureaus, further 
south in the state, have had 
to lay off workers. 

"We thought the weath- 
er's going to kill (tourism)." 
said Carey who has con- 
cluded that the weather may 
have helped draw people to 



the city's attractions. 

As for international visi- 
tors. Carey said that touring 
in the United States "is still 
a cheaper option for them. 
"We're still doing better 
than the rest of the state." 

"We are uniquely posi- 
tioned because of the (Ad- 
ams) mini-series and David 
McCullough (books)." said 
Carey while Peak described 
special attractions and pro- 
grams at the park this year. 

One of the more unique 
attractions is a wrought-iron 
bench temporarily sited at 
the far end of the park's gar- 
dens. 

The friendship bench 
was created in the Ural 
Mountains of Russia and 
sent to the United States as 
a symbol of the friendship 



Graffiti Offenders 
Face Crackdown 



Cont 'd From Page I 

lant, and we need our resi- 
dents to be vigilant, too. by 
reporting these incidents." 

Police track graffiti re- 
ports around Quincy, look- 
ing for similar styles and 
other evidence to connect 



cases. The department has 
been successful in tracking 
some of the most serious of- 
fenders. Keenan said. 

Residents are encouraged 
to call the Quincy Police De- 
partment at 6 1 7-479- 1 2 1 2 to 
report graffiti incidents. 




rUMMER DAZC 



aoo9! 

Summer Fun 



Ages 3 to 6 * Tues., Wed., Thurs. am 

• Creative Movement • Gymnastics 
• Arts & Crafts • Story Time • Fun & Games 

6 Week Summer Session 

•Gymnastics Ages 2 to 12 
• Dance Ages 3 to 7 • Hip Hop Ages 5 to 10 

Programs start the week of July 13th 
Reserve your space r)ow! Class size is limited. 

64 ROSS WAY, QUINCY / 617-471-3808 

WWW.Y0UNGW0RLDSCH00L.COM 






9 



!!!Now Open!!! 




Quarrv Hills 
Animal Ho$|)ital 

Judie A Paulauski DVM 

406 Willard Street 
Quincy MA 02169 

617-934-4892 

M-W-F 7:30 am - 5:00 pm 
T-TH 7:30 am - 7:00 pm / Sat 8 am - 1 pm 

Yourpet^s health and happiness are our #/ priority! 



between the two countries 
established in 1807 by then 
Ambassador John Quincy 
Adams. 

The bench, encrypted 
with the message, "From 
People to People" in Eng- 
lish and in Russian, will be 
transported to Alton, NH 
next week after the celebra- 
tion of Adams' 242nd birth- 
day anniversary. 

The park will offer a 
host of other special events 
through July and August, 
according to Peak. 

While tourism appears 
to be steady this year, Car- 
ey fears the worst is yet to 
come as advertising funds 
dry up for his bureau and 
the other five bureaus on the 
"Cultural Coast." 

The six agencies have 
been working in tandem to 
attract visitors to all areas. 

"We just have to tread wa- 
ter," said Carey who didn't 
take a raise. Carey's bud- 
get has already been cut by 
35%. State aid was chopped 
by half and hotel and motel 
receipts are down. 

"We do a lot with a little. 
We get creative," said Car- 
ey, noting he has one part- 
time aide and has begun 
fund-raising efforts for the 
agency. 

The shame of it, said 
Carey, is that every dollar 
spent on advertising brings 
in four dollars to the local 
economy. 

That's three dollars in in- 
come that cities and towns 
won't see next year, accord- 
ing to Carey. 



Mary's Crispy Oatmeal Cookies 



If you like cookies that are crispy, you will 
love this recipe for oatmeal ccx)kies. And if 
you believe the hype about including oatmeal 
in your diet will lower cholesterol, it will be 
healthy as well as delicious. 

Anyway, last week at a luncheon attended 
by a group of my first cousins, one of our 
close friends Mary Mariano (who is a cousin 
by love and friendship) gave me this great 
recipe. 

CRISPY OATMEAL COOKIES 
2 cups flour 
1 cup granulated sugar 
1 cup brown sugar 
additional sugar for coating 
1 teaspoon baking soda 
1/2 teaspoon salt 
1 cup margarine 



2 eggs 

1/2 teaspoon vanilla 

1 1/2 cups oatmeal 

1/2 cup. finely chopped walnuts 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees 

Mix the first six ingredients. Add the 
margarine eggs and vanilla. Beat well and 
then stir in the oats and nuts. Form into small 
balls and roll in the additional sugar. If you 
prefer a larger cookie as 1 do,just make them 
according to your preference. 

Place on ungreased cookie sheet and bake 
for 10 to 12 minutes. 

If making the balls small they spread 
so place about 12 of them on one cookie 
sheet. 

This recipe makes about six dozen cook- 
ies. 



Director: More Children Need 
Aid From Veterans' Services 



Thomas Siansbury, direc- 
tor of Quincy Veterans' Ser- 
vices, this week described 
an increasing number of 
children needing the help 
from Veterans Services. 

Just a year ago, Stans- 
bury said, "We only had six 
children," while last week. 



the number had surged to 25 
from seven to eight different 
families. 

Stansbury said that veter- 
ans' services provides coun- 
seling so that applicants can 
seek financial help for food, 
clothing or rent. 

"We help them go 



through all the agencies," 
Stansbury said. 

Most of the current ap- 
plicants are veterans of the 
Vietnam War, according to 
Stansbury who said most 
of them have lost their jobs, 
but still have families to 
help support. 



13 Quincy Residents Graduate 
Norfolk County Agricultural High School 



Thirteen Quincy students 
were among the graduating 
class at the Norfolk County 
Agricultural School which 
recently held its commence- 
ment. 

They are: 

Erin Marie Callaghan, 
Nicholas Matthew Cati- 
zone, Sarah Ann Chieng, 



Too Good to Pass Up!" - hidderiboston.com 

(UDronin's; 



TWIN LOBSTER SPECIAL 

with potato, corn & drawn butter 
$ ^ Q95 While they last (dlne-ln only) 

Support your local fishermen 
all lobsters bought from quincy boats! 



Sarah Catherine Dumas, 
Christina Marie Gravina, 
Deirdre Anne Lombard, 
Aaron Xavier McCloskey, 
Siohban Moriarty, Patricia 
Carole Patterson , Andrea 
Nicole Reardon, Brittany 
Rose Regal, Megan Eliza- 
beth Riley and Caitlin Mary 
VanderMeel . 

Several Quincy gradu- 
ates were also presented 
awards and scholarships. 

Aaron Xavier McClos- 
key received a Proficiency 



Award in the Plant and 
Environmental Science for 
Natural Resources. 

Siobhan Moriarty re- 
ceived the Henry J. Lewan- 
dowski Memorial Scholar- 
ship. 

Nicholas Matthew Cati- 
zone was presented the 
Marshfield Fair and Roche 
Bros. Supermarkets Schol- 
arship. 

Sarah Catherine Dumas 
received the Stephen E. 
Moran Scholarship. 



FISHERMAN'S PLATTER 

95 



Golden fried scrod, whole clams 
and scallops, fresh dally form 
the Boston Fish Pier. 



H4 



NATIVE STEAMERS 

$g95 



with drawn butter and broth. 



SIRLOIN TIPS (OR TURKEY TIPS) 

Our Famous Best Seller, StillJust..^^^^^ 

STUMP TEAM TRIVIA EVERY SUNDAY AT 6 PM 
NOCHAIffiET0PUY--PRiZE$l!l 

H Hotdogs during every Red Sox game 



23 DesMoincs Rd. • Quincv Point 
•Takeout 617-786-9804 

(Bit ween the .Ship>ard and 
I(HM) .Southern Arter\ Senior ("enlirl 



W^ W W «STE AKXIPS .COIVl 




m SfORTSMAW'S m 

Bait & Tackle 

Hunting & Fishing Licenses Sold 

Deer Check Station • Rod & Reel Repair 

Hunting Gear & Supplies • Skate Sharpening 

666 Southern Artery 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617-770-3884 



X 




Wicked Good Doq 

A Wicked Good Pet Sitting 
Private & Group instruction 

In-Home & On-Site training for Puppies & 
Dogs of all sizes by a Masters' Degreed 
Certified Professional 

Pet Sitting for Dogs, Cats, Birds & 

other Exotic Pets 
Dog Walks 
Indoor Play Groups for 
Dogs matched to size 





5 Copeland St, Quincy 617-934-4955 

www.WldaMlGoo(l£k^(.£oiii 



Ihursday, .|ul> 9. 2(M)y The Qmxincy Sun Paav t 



Rx Medicine Drop-Off Deemed Success Q uincy 2000 , QB A Merger 



The Mayor's Drug Task 
Force and Quincy's End 
Drug Abuse Now (EDAN) 
recently joined forces with 
the Quincy Police and the 
DPW to rid the community 
of nearly 2,000 doses of 
dangerous controlled sub- 
stances. 

More than 50 residents 
showed-up at the Police 
Department to dispose of 
thousands of unwanted and 
expired prescription and 
non-prescription medicines. 
These and other highly ad- 
dictive prescription drugs 
were cleaned out from med- 
icine cabinets in the city's 
first Rx Medicine Drop-off. 
Participants were greet- 
ed by Dale Freeman, chair 
and co-founder of EDAN. 
. and instructed to leave the 
material with Quincy po- 
lice officers Mike Kelly and 
John Lechte. 

Volunteer pharmacist 
Vicki Tang of the CVS 
pharmacy on Southern Ar- 
tery performed sorting and 
counting. Then, the mate- 
rial was placed into the ap- 
propriate containers for de- 
struction. 

The "drop-off' event 
grew out of concerns by 
members of the Mayor's 
Drug Task Force that many 
of today's drug addicts be- 
gan their abuse by pilfer- 
ing drugs at home. Studies 
show that children can be- 
gin a lifetime of addiction 
to drugs by simply open- 
ing their medicine cabinet. 
Drugs such as OxyContin, 
oxycodone, hydrocodone, 
morphine, codeine, Perco- 
cet, Darvocet, Vicodin and 
Lortab have all been linked 
to opiate addiction. 




MAYOR TOM KOCH speaks with Det. Lt. Pat CJIynn, head of 
the Quincy Police Department's drug unit, at the Prescription 
Drug Disposal Day. 




DISPOSAL DAY - A 55 gallon container filled with prescrip- 
tion drugs including OxyContin, oxycodone, morphine, Vico- 
din, and Lortab. 



Members of EDAN, a 
group of Quincy residents 
dedicated to the fight against 
drug abuse in Quincy and 
members of the Mayor's 



long way to minimizing that 
possibility." 

There is also concern 
about medications in the 
water supply not being ad- 



Task and Force, organized equately cleared by water 



and developed the event 

Mayer Thomas Koch 
said at the event, "Too often 
children begin experiment- 
ing with powerful drugs 
found in their medicine cab- 
inet. This event will go a 



treatment plants. The ma- 
terial collected at the event 
will be incinerated at the 
Covanta Semass burn facil- 
ity. Event organizers noted, 
"Never dump any kind of 
medicine down the drain." 



Michael Lynch Graduates Bentley 

Michael Lynch of Quin- joring in business manage- 

cy, son of Patrick and Karen ment. 
Lynch, has graduated magna A Boston College High 

cum laude from Bentley School graduate. Lynch will 

University in Waltham, ma- pursue an MBA. 




=— .Vsbort Slays! 




ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY 



• Exciting Activities & 
Social Programs 

• Trusted, Caring Staff 

• Individualized Personal Care 

• Coordination of Healthcare 
Appointments 

• Medication Management 

• Restaurant-Style Dining 

• Spacious Aparunents 

• Transportation to 
Shopping & more! 

Welch Healthcare & Retirement Croup is a 
family-otciieJ company celehratm^ 60 years 
of quality service to older adults. 



Allerton House 



at Hancock Park 
Assisted Living C'ommunity 

164 Parking\vay 
Quincy, MA 02169 

60 Years of . 
Quality ServicQ 

4Welch 



HEALTHCARE AND 
RETIREMENT GROUP 



Qumcy 2{KM) Collabora- 
tive and the Quincy Busi 
ness Association (QBA), 
two prominent non-profit 
business organizations in the 
City of Quincy. have voted 
to merge effective Aug .^ 



that focuses on the future re- 
development of Downtown 
Quincy 

Benefits of the merge 
mcludes reducing the du 
plication of resources and 
services, thereby maximi/- 



21 ' cenlurv mixed use ur- 
ban environment proposed 
for Downtown Quincy 

"In these challenging 
economic times it became 
evident that combining l>oth 
organizations will reduce 



Ihe l6()-member QBA mg staff, funding and intel- expenses and provide better 



will merge its member- 
ship and assets into the 
41()-member Quincy 2()(K) 
Collaborative. 

"We are excited about 
the opportunity to combine 
organizations, creating a 
stronger and unified voice 
for the business community, 
especially in anticipation of 
the proposed Si ^ billion re- 
development of Downtown 
Quincy," said Jeff Bertman. 
president of the QBA and 
proprietor of Rogers .Jewel- 
ers . 

Maralin Manning. long- 
time executive director of 
the QBA. will join the staff 
of Quincy 2()(K) Collabora- 
tive. 

The Quincy 2(KX) Board 
of Directors will be ex- 
panded by three seats to 
accommodate three mem- 
bers of the existing Quincy 
Business Association Board 
of Directors. The existing 
QBA office in Quincy Cen- 
ter will remain open, and 
will become a Quincy 200() 
Collaborative satellite office 



lectual capital that will novv 
be combined under one or- 
ganization; eliminating the 
natural competing nature 
of the two organizations tor 
local funding, membership 
dollars, donations and spon- 
sorships; forming a single, strengthens our goal to sup- 
business en- port existing businesses 



services and resource^ to our 
growing membership." said 
Ldward Keohane. president 
of Quincy 2(KK) Collabora- 
tive and owner of Keohane 
funeral Homes 

"Ihe merger further 



prominent 
tity to join and support will 
save existing and potential 
members of both organiza- 
tions mone) and resource'v 
through a single membership 
organization and fee struc- 
ture; establishing a new and 
re-energized business entit) 
to match the quality and dy- 
namism of the nevv Quincy 
Center redevelopment pro- 
posal and creating a larger. 
unified and more compre- 
hensive voice to represent 
the business communitv 
and to support the common 
long-term goals and objec- 
tives of both organizations, 
as well as those of the neu 



attract qualit> commercial 
investment, and help make 
our great cit\ a better place 
in uhich to !i\e, uork. visit 
and invest." Kei>hane said 

Ihe Quincv 2(MK) Col- 
laborative IS a private, non- 
proht economic develop- 
ment corporation that unites 
Quincv "s public and private 
sectors in a common mis- 
sion for economic develop- 
ment. Quincv 2(KKl\ offices 
arc located at 1250 Hanc(Kk 
Street. Suite 12''N. Quin- 
cv. MA 02169 To contact 
Quincv 2tKK) Collaborative 
call 617-S47-1454 or visit 



\s •■.», 



Alicia Huang Graduates Babson 

Alicia Huang of Quincy. Babson College in Welles- 
recently graduated from ley. 



f Quincy Creamery 

If 107 Franklin St 

▼ Quincy. Ma. 02169 
T 

\ Buy ANY CONE 

» SET ONE FREE 

t ( OF EQUAi- Oft Lessen VAu* ) 1,/fe is Smfeet' 

ffTYfYfffTYffTrfTTffTTfTTfTT 




f 
f 

f 

f 



POLITICAL ADVERTlSh.MEN I 



POLITICAL ,AD\ LKl I.Sh.VILVI 



Please Join Us For A 

TRADITIONAL 



i^/^^/^^r BARBECUE 

With 






h^ 



At 



V Marina Bay Beach Club 

''Formally Water Works' 

Marina Bay, Quincy 



^ 






Thursday, July 1 6th, 2009, 6-9 P.M. 

Traditional Summertime Cookout 

featuring Music by 'VENTED CANS'' 

Donation $20.00 per person 

For tickets and information, call 617-376-0900 

Checks may be sent to the C'lH. 

Michael W Mornssey. PO Box Zl.'^. 

North Quincy. MA 02 PI 

Paid for and authnn^ed b> Ihe Committee to Re elect Michael \^ Momssey 






Page 10 Ttte Q«:&izicy Siun Thursday, July 9. 2009 



Kennedy Senior Center: 
A $13 Million Renovation 



The half-century old 
building, now home to Ken- 
nedy Senior Center at 440 
East Squantum, North Quin- 
cy, underwent a $ 1 .3 million 
renovation and costly sewer 
rehabilitation before last 
week's dedication. 

Originally called the 
Myles Standish Elementary 
School, the l5,000-sq. ft. 
structure was built in 1957 
on 1 1 acres near the comer 
of Quincy Shore Drive. 

After a dip in enroll- 
ment, the school closed in 
1980. The following year, 
the Quincy Lodge of Elks 
began using the building for 
their community service or- 
ganization. 

In 1994, the Beechwood 
Community Center opened 
an intergenerational ser- 
vice center which closed 
last summer when Mayor 



Thomas Koch reclaimed the 
building for the senior cen- 
ter. 

Tom Clasby, Executive 
Director of the Council on 
Aging, said the center will 
offer senior's social, educa- 
tional, sports, forums, and 
health programs in the build- 
ing which features a coffee 
shop, gymnasium restaurant 
facility, computer room and 
game room with card tables, 
a pool table, and a donated 
Ping-Pong table to come. 

Seniors are, also, offered 
tax and legal services such 
as deed searches through 
William O'Donnell, Nor- 
folk Register of Deeds, who 
said seniors can search their 
deeds and property at the 
center, "Our computers can 
tie into the office in Ded- 
ham." 

'T am so thrilled," Dorelle 



Howe, 69, of Quincy Shore 
Drive, said last week of the 
new center as she echoed 
the voices of hundreds of 
seniors enjoying the center 
last week. 

Koch's choice of the for- 
mer school was not unani- 
mous among some former 
city officials who had cho- 
sen Merry mount Park and 
the Department of Public 
works site for a senior cen- 
ter, cifing the North Quincy 
location as inconvenient. 

Clasby counters those 
critics by noting that any lo- 
cation would be difficult for 
some senior citizen bloc and 




FIRE SAFETY 

by Captain Tbm Lyons 

Fti'e PreventhH Bureau 

Quincy Fm Department ' 



Marine Fuel Facilities 

Here's a summer subject rial shall be extinguished, within the code, here's a sug- 

worth touching upon again, and all exposed heating el- gestion as well. Have guests 

marine fueling. Many ves- ements must be turned off. disembark the vessel dunng 

Galley stoves must be exUn 



sels are fueled at one of the 
city's 5 marine fuel facilities 
while a continuation of our 
historic safety record will be 
appreciated again this sea- 
son as well. 

A fuel facility is defined 
as that area within 25 feet 
of dispensers where marine 



vessels receive fuel. Within 

the new' center is easily ac- that space there should be 

cessible by public transit. no potential ignition sources 

"if you placed it in the such as outdoor grill use or 

middle of the square, some- cigarette use. Attendants 



guished. All ports, windows, 
doors and hatches must be 
shut. A sufficient number of 
fire extinguishers must be 
readily available. The fuel 
nozzle must remain in con- 
tact with the vessel to elimi- 
nate the build up of a static 
charge, a potential ignition 
source. A tank must not be 
fully filled to avoid spill- 
age. Keep in mind that fuel 



the fueling operation and 
walk a fair distance away 
from the fueling facility. In 
the unlikely event of a fire 
or emergency, the evacua- 
tion at that point is neariy 
complete. Having read a 
clipping or two concerning 
fires or explosions while 
fueling at marine facilities, 
I've read where boaters and 
guests seek safety by jump- 
ing overboard. It must be 



is typically pumped from an alarming scene. At least 




body's going to have to trav- must be aware of all safety underground storage tanks consider my suggestion to 

el to get there " measures at a facility such stored there at a lower tem- avoid that possibility 

In addition, Clasy cited as emergency fuel shutoffs, peratures than your typical 

the thousands of seniors' and electrical shutoffs. At- summer atmospheric tem- 



KING OPTICAL 

BRIGHT SUNSHINE AND GLARE A PROBLEM? 
TRY PRESCRIPTION POLARIZED SUNGLASSES 

(781) 843-2133 

20 School Street West • Braintree 

(Off Washington Street) 



visiting the former COA of- 
fices. 

The city's Health De- 
partment offices headed by 
Drew Scheele are, also, lo- 
cated in the newly renovated 
building. 

Two Residents 
Wentworth Grads 

Stanley Huang and Rus- 
sell Lees, both of Quincy, 
were among the 144 stu- 
dents who graduated at 
the spring commencement 
at Wentworth Institute of 
Technology in Boston. 



tendants must remain at a 
fuel nozzle where latch- 
open devices must be de- 
feated. During our yeariy 
inspections this is one of 
the features we check upon 
to assure a nozzle cannot be 
used while unattended. 

Before fueling opera- 
tions can commence, the 
following precautions must 
be observed: 

All engines, motors, fans 
and bilge blowers, which are 
not explosion proof, shall be 
shut down. All open flame 
devices and smoking mate- 



peratures. Thus fuel expan- 
sion is a threat warranting a 
2% expansion space within 
the vessel tank. 



We've done our best to 
maintain safe marine fuel- 
ing facilities within the city, 
while we ask for your coop- 
eration when using them as 
well . Prepare for and consid- 



After fueling, the entire gr safety in every way while 

vessel shall remain opened on the water, and make this 

with bilge blowers turned the best summer yet. Enjoy 

on and allowed to run for 5 boating while leaving room 

minutes before starting en- to do so safely, 

gines or lighting galleys. Thank you. 

Although not specified 

'Okie's Fundraiser' 
At Marina Bay July 17 



1 




[hiincy Typewriter Service 

SALES - SERVICE - REHTALS 

Bob Barker Gerry Barker 

SUMMER SPECIAL 

IBM Selectrics Reconditioned 

Starting at $229^ and up while they last! 

5 Maple Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 617-472-3656 



The Water Club Marina 
Bay will host the third an- 
nual "Okie's Funraiser" Fri- 
day, July 17 from 5 to 9 p.m. 
There will be refreshments, 
raffles and music. 

Donations of $20 may be 
made at the door. Proceeds 
in John O'Connell's memo- 



High School graduates and 
contribute to, the develop- 
ment of an" anti -violence 
education video. ^»^ 

0'Conneli,aN6rthQuiti- 
cy graduate himself, died as 
the result of a violent act 
while attending Westfield 
State College. 



PROFE 




lONAL 





EC TORY 



ACUPUNCTURE 



ACUPUNCTURE ASSOCIATES 
OF THE SOUTH SHORE 



INSURANCE 



• SINCE 1982 • 



ARE YOO SICK AND TIRED 
or FECUNO SICK AND TIREO? 



Tn^ AcHpHHctHit 



t 



Aco»»UNCTUi»e IS A SAre and crrKcnve rOA awwoved 

TReATMKNT FOR OVE« SO MEACTM CtWOITIONS IMCLUDINO 

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Thursday, July 9, 2009 The Qixincy Sian Page 11 



New City Website Launches Today 



The city's new website, 
ww.w.Qumo:MA.vgyv, will 
launch today (Thursday) 
allowing residents for the 
first time to pay bills online, 
receive e-mail alerts, and 
streamline their requests for 
city services, among dozens 
of new features. 

"This kind of platform 
is long overdue, as we are 
finally putting state-of-the- 
art technology to use for 
our residents," said Mayor 
Thomas Koch, "it will make 
it many times easier for resi- 
dents to do business with the 
city, which should always 
be one of our most impor- 
tant goals." 

The new site changes 
the city's web address from 
the clunky www.ci .guincy. 



ma. us to the simple www, 
Qumy.>'JVlA.iL>v, and pro- 
vides easy-to-use navigation 
t(x>ls so visitors can find in- 
formation quickly. 

A regularly updated cal- 
endar of city meetings and 
events, an e-mail newsletter 
and alert system, the ability 
to pay bills online, and doz- 
ens of new downloadable 
forms and applications are 
among the site's new fea- 
tures. 

"Our ongoing improve- 
ments to the city's net- 
work will make the site run 
smoothly and quickly for 
most users, and this plat- 
form will allow folks to find 
what they are looking for 
within a couple of mouse 



clicks," said Charles Phelan, 
the Director of Information 
Technology. 

The site also boasts a 
new system for submitting 
and managing service re- 
quests, from filling potholes 
to replacing streetlights. 
The system will allow offi- 
cials to streamline requests 
to the right department, and 
provides a tracking compo- 
nent that will follow every 
request until it is closed. 

The new site was de- 



signed and created by Cy- 
clone Design of Qumcy and 
Blue Note Technology of 
Somerville, and the firms 
spent several months work- 
ing with the city's team to 
implement the new technol- 
ogy 

"Our IT team and our 
partners from Cyclone and 
Blue Note have created one 
of the best government sites 
in Massachusetts, and I am 
very grateful for all of their 
work," Koch said. 




MATT FORBES, a student at Archbishop Williams High 
Sch(M>l, rai-ses an empty bowl and a Quinc> Creamery t-shirt 
after successfully winning the ice cream shop's "Brain Freeze" 
contest. Forbes managed to eat eight scoops of ice cream, four 
candies and six toppings in 25 minutes. Quincy Creamer>, this 
spring, moved from Quincy Center and has reopened at 107 
Franklin St. The shop offers 30 flavors of hard-ser> ed and soft- 
served ice cream. 



Summerfest Concert July 15 Features Denis O'Gorman 



Four Residents On Presidents' List 



Four local students have 
been named to the Presi- 
dents' List at Bendey Uni- 
versity in Waltham for the 
spring semester. 



They are: 

Seniors. Monica Mui and 
JackTran. 

Sophomores: Jonathan 
Tarn and Jenny Tam. 



The Summerfest Con- 
cert Wednesday, July 15 
at 7 p.m. at the Ruth Gor- 
don Amphitheater in Mer- 
rymount Park will feature 
Denis O'Gorman and his 
authentic Irish band. 

Denis, a Quincy resident. 



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Page 12 Tlie Quinosr Svtxk Thursday, July 9, 2009 




LT. DAN MINTON 



A Job Well Done 

On Monday, June 29, at approximately 4:30 p.m.. Of- 
ficers Joseph Paccioretti and Barry DeFranco were dis- 
patched to the playground at 
O'Rourke Field for a call of a 
larceny, with the suspect still 
on scene. Uj)on arrival, the of- 
ficers were flagged down by an 
adult male (father), who stated 
that an adult male suspect 
took $12 from his 12-year-old 
daughter. The father said his 
daughter called him and he 
went directly to her location, 
then called the Police. 

He brought his daughter and 
her two witness/friends over 
to the officer. The daughter/ 

victim said that they were too afraid to confront the man 
so she called her dad. The victim said that she placed her 
purse on the ground near the swing set while they played. 
One of the girls saw a man approach the purse and begin 
to rummage through it. She told her friends and they 
watched as he removed money from the purse, then put 
the purse back down and walk away. 

The victim said she waited for the suspect to walk 
away, then picked up her purse and confirmed that her 
$12 was nussing. She stated she had a $10 bill that was 
folded multiple times along with two $1 bills. The girls 
told the officers that the man was still in the park and 
was over by the swings where three small children were 
playing. 

The officers approached the suspect and informed him 
of the victim's statement. The suspect denied taking the 
money or touching the purse. Officer Paccioretti then 
asked the suspect for an ID and as he reached into both 
pants pockets, he pulled a bundle of money from his 
left pocket along with keys and a driver's license. 

The officer observed the money was folded in half. He 
also observed the suspect remove a hand full of crumpled 
paper from his right pocket. One of the papers was a $10 
bill that was folded multiple times. 

The 12-year-old victim, who was standing nearby, 
pointed at the $10 bill in the suspect's right hand and 
said, "That's it." The suspect claimed it was his. 

Officer Paccioretti asked the suspect why it was sepa- 
rate from the money in his left pocket and folded differ- 
ently but he did not answer, then put the money in his 
right hand and placed it back in his pocket. The victim's 
father stated that he would be satisfied if his daughter got 
her money back and would not press charges. The sus- 
pect did not respond to this offer. 

Officer DeFranco offered the suspect the opportuni- 
ty again to give back the money and be on his way, but 
he refused. The officers then approached the suspect and 
informed him he was under arrest and as they were about 
to handcuff him, the suspect said that he changed his 
mind and was willing to give the money back. 

The suspect, a 27-year-old Boston resident, was arrest- 
ed and charged with "larceny from a person." The mon- 
ey was photographed as evidence and then returned to 
the victim. 

In this case, the victims were very observant of their 
surroundings and once the crime occurred, they collec- 
tively took the right course of action by not confronting 
the suspect, but instead, contacting an adult. The parent 
responded immediately, assessed the situation, and then, 
using great restraint, called the Police. These children 
were well educated in handling a potentially volatile inci- 
dent and minimized their own risk by moving away from 
the suspect until help arrived. All parents and concerned 
adults should take this opportunity to discuss this case as 
well as other scenarios with children so that they too will 
take the best measures. 

Nice Work! 




If you have infonnation on the above crimes, drag 
activity or any crime, please call the Qaincy Police 
Detective Bureaa at 617-745-5764 or log onto the fcA- 
lowing website: http://tinyuri£om/ytf6td. 

If you wish to report suspicious drag activity, call 
the Dmg Hot-Line at 617-328-4527. You will not be 
required to identify yourself, but it could help. If you 
wish to make an appointment to view the Registered 
Sex OBea^krs book, call Detective Cindy Walsh at 
«7-745.5751. 

If you wish to contact the Crime Prevention Officer 
for tips or comments, my direct line is 617-745-5719. My 
enmail address is dminton@cix)uincyjnajJS 
-4j. Dan Mutton 



OUINCY POLICE STATISTICS: JUNE 26 - lULY 3 

Total Calls for Service : 1,165 

Total Arrests : 32 

Total Stolen Motor Vehicles : 4 

FRIDAY. JUNE 26 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:05 a.m., Fayette St. and 
Holbrook Rd. Tagging to equipment. Two pieces of equipment 
owned by P.A. Landers. 

LARCENY, 10:23 am.. Abbey TVavel Service, 657 Adams 
St. By check. Advised, civil matter. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:24 a jn., 120 East Squan- 
tum St. Mail box. Thick liquid 1/3 filled in mail box. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:15 pjn., Pizza Connec- 
tion Plus, 41 SafTord St Tagging 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:46 pjn., 380 Water St To 
car. Chemical thrown onto paint. Happened June 24. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:08 pjn., 132 Faxon Rd. In 
progress. A youth pulling off the pickets on the fence. House 
close to Billings Road. Youth brought home to parents. 

LARCENY, 4:05 pjn., 530 Willard St. Past/motor vehicle. 
Motor vehicle - 2003 Dodge - was damaged possibly by a 
BBgun. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 8:23 p.m., 55 
Elm wood Park. Dwelling. 

SATURDAY. .n/NE 27 
LARCENY, 1:11 pjn.. Star Market, 130 Granite St. 

Wallet. 

LARCENY, 1:53 pjn., 1259 Sea St. Jewelry. Rings went 
missing from apartment between March 1 and present day. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:32 pjn., 37 Roberts St. 
Window. Possible random act. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10: 13 pjn., 119 Parkingway . 
To vehicle. Entire side was keyed. Driver's side front quarter 
panel, driver's side front and rear door keyed. 2006 Hyundai 
Sonata. 

SUNDAY, nJNK 28 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 4:52 pjn., 27 Richie Rd. 
Past. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 5:37 p.m., YMCA, 79 Cod- 
dington St. Past motor vehicle. Windshield broken. 1996 
Honda Civic. 

MONDAY, nJNE 29 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 4:38 a jn., 
310 Water St. Dwelling. Female wearing a red jacket entered 
through a window. White female in mid 20s. Fled out the front 
door. About five minutes old. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:26 a.m., 66 Centre St 
Past. Porta-potty pushed over, happened sometime over the 
weekend. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:59 a.m., 530 WUlard St 
Window. Rear right window. 2005 Ford Focus. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 9:10 a.m., Captains 
Cove Condos, 200 Coveway. Already found. Somerville PD 
called, located 2000 Dodge Caravan, color blue, damaged igni- 
tion at 109 College Ave. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:49 ajn., 105 Doane St. Car. 
2000 Mitsubishi Mirage. 

LARCENY, 11 ajn., Lori Ann's, 853 Hancock St. Caller 
states her purse was stolen yesterday at the above. 

LARCENY, I2;40 pjn., 71 Quarterdeck Rd. iPod Touch 
Also cell phone. Happened sometime last night. 

INDECENT EXPOSURE, 1:28 p.m., Quincy Credit 
Union, 100 Quincy Ave. Male. Arrest made for open and gross 
lewdness, disorderly and open container. 

LARCENY, 4:29 p.m., O'Rourke Playground, 503 
Quarry St. Arrest for larceny from a person. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 5:38 p.m., 30 
Taffrail Rd. Dwelling. X-Box and games, cash, check, lock 
box known missing. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:44 pjn., 72 Crescent St. To 
motor vehicle. Air was let out of the tires sometime overnight 
night. Ford Taurus. 

TUESDAY. .nJNE 30 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:59 ajn., 138 Old Colony 
Ave. To motor vehicle. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 1:13 a.m., Louis Anthony 
Salon, 229 Parkingway. Just occurred. White male, early 20's, 
black and white striped shirt, walking on School St. towards 
Square. Threw a barrell through the windows. Suspect located 
at Elm St. and Baxter St. Arrest for malicious damage. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 1:30 ajn., 
WoUaston Theater, 14 Beale St. Arrest made. Caller saw a 
white male, 6-foot, wearing grey hoodie possibly break win- 
dow in the theater. Window on west side of building, broken, 
shopping carriage underneath it, believed to be a break. K-5 
took one into custody inside of building. Determined location 
of break was Wollaston Theater. Arrest for B&E night-time and 
malicious damage. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 7:22 ajn., 35 RusseU St 
2006 Lexus RX400H, color brown. Last seen around midnight. 
Doors were locked and the keys were not in the vhicle. 

LARCENY, 9:37 ajn., 1515 Hancock St. Up top. 



VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:10 a.m., Carroll the 
Mover, 70 Bates Ave. Tagging on the highway side of the 
building. 

LARCENY, 11:39 ajn., 35 Russell St Laptop Party re- 
ported his vehicle was stolen overnight, now states a laptop was 
taken in addition to his vehicle. 

LARCENY, 12:06 p.m., 25 School St Money. 

LARCENY, 1 :20 p jn.. Star Market, 130 Granite St Wal- 
let stolen and debit card was used in Roxbury. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:32 p.m., Monti Granite 
Co., Inc., 266 Centre St. Tagging. Arrangements made to have 
spray paint taken off. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 5:36 pjn., 494 
Willard St. Dwelling. Laptop taken. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 5:56 pjn., 25 Roberts St. 
Spray painted a van. 

LARCENY, 6:10 pjn., 1439 Furnace Brook Parkway. 
past. Has checks from insufficient funds. Civil matter, ad- 
vised. 

WFDNFiiDAY. nJI.Y 1 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:04 ajn., 420 Granite St 
Graffiti. Pod in driveway spray-painted overnight on June 29. 

LARCENY, 9:26 ajn., 1439 Furnace Brook Parkway. 
Past. Of a check. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 10:34 ajn., 1000 South- 
em Artery. Pasdt. 1999 Dodge Caravan, color red. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 1:25 p.m., 161 
Arlington St. Dwelling. Past incident, happened May 17. 

LARCENY, 6:44 pjn., 58 Hohnes St. Of medication. Caller 
states someone stole his medication while visiting yesterday. 

LARCENY, 7:08 pjn., YMCA, 79 Coddington St. Three 
cell phones stolen. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 7:30 p.m., 9 
George Rd. TV taken. 

LARCENY, 7:40 p.m., YMCA, 79 Coddington St. 
Phones. 

LARCENY, 7:41 p.m., YMCA, 79 Coddington St. 
Phones. 

LARCENY, 8:36 pjn., 207 Copeland St. Dog. Two males 
stole 14- week pitbull out of yard approximately 5 minutes ago. 
One had a green camo hooded sweatshirt. 

LARCENY, 9:35 pjn., 287 Copeland St. Past. Tenant found 
belongings on the sidewalk. Landlord needs to be advised and 
tenant wants to press charges. Complaints to be filed larceny 
over and malicious destruction of property. 
THURSDAY. ITU Y 2 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:58 ajn., Common Mar- 
ket, 97 Willard St. Concrete. Parties writing in newly poured 
concrete - owner notified. Two parties sent on way. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:59 ajn., Montague Brown 
Co., 310 Washington St. Taggingh. Building and window 
tagged. 

LARCENY, 9:33 a.m.. Presidents City Inn, 845 Hancock 
St. ID/cell phone. See manager, has a female there who had her 
ID and cell phone stolen by an unknown male. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 1:25 p.ni.. Granite Street 
Cafe, 378 Granite St. Window. White male last seen wearing 
black shirt with yello writing on the back, long blonde hair head- 
ing down Water Street. Located near Eastern Bank, Water Street 
Bridge. One under arrest for malicious damage over $250. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 5:57 p.ni., Ross Park- 
ing Area, 96 Parkingway. 2003 Dodge Stratus. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:02 pjn.. Granite RaU, 16 
Cottage Ave. To window. Someone threw something at above 
business and now he's being chased by employee behind busi- 
ness. Two white males, one wearing white, one wearing black. 
One party PC arrest, other party arrested one charge of malicious 
destruction of personal property. 

FRIDAY. nJI.Y 3 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7: 13 ajn., Torre Dei Passeri 
Social Club, 252 Washington St. Graffiti. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:32 a.m., Hassan Broth- 
ers, Inc., 290 Washington St. Wmdows. Three windows were 
broken sometime overnight. Nothing appears missing. 

□ 

STOLEN MOTOR VEHICLES: Russell Street, Park- 
ingway, 1000 block of Southern Artery, Cove Way. 

G 

CAR BREAKS: Martell Avenue, 200 block of High- 
land Avenue, Parkingway, Reardon Street, 100 block of 
Main Street, low numbers of South Central Avenue, Baxter 
Street, Allerton Street, Cove Way, Granger Street, Linden 
Street, 600 block of Adams Street, 100 block of Rock Island 
Road, Cottage Avenue, Old Colony Avenue, 1200 block of 
Sea Street, 300 block of Water Street, Pope Street, 300 block 
of Newport Avenue. (Arrests have been made on some of 
these breaks) 

□ 

BREAKS AND ATTEMPTED BREAKS: Elmwood 
Park, Taffrail Road, George Road, 400 block of Willard 
Street. 



Thursday, July 9, 2009 Tbe Qulncy Sun Page 13 



FLYNN AUCTIONS 



PRIVATE SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION 

Auction to be held on the premises 

I I Bayberry Lane» Weston, MA 



Custom gated estate colonial with over 6100 sq ft of living space on 1.3 manicured, landscaped 
acres. Privately sited on culde-sac this beautiful home offers a lighted tennis/basketball court, 
spectacular bluestone patio, steam bath with shower, gourmet kitchen, game room, five bed- 
rooms, five full and two half baths. Incredible 1 ft ceilings, detailed moldings, open floor plan, 
enclosed yard, and more. Convenient to downtown Boston, major routes and schools. 

1% Broker Participation • 6% Buyer's Premium • MA LIC #300 



PRIVATE SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION 

Auction to be held on the premises 

Winnipesaukee Pavilion, Alton, NH 



August 1 5, 2009 @ I PM 



^a 



'« JH~t » I » * * 



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1 UNIT WILL SELL ABSOLUTE! 



1% Broker Participation • 6% Buyer's Premunn • P Talkowski NH LIC #3059 



FLYNN PROPERTIES 



FOR SALE 




T 



m w^mm 



UNDER AGREEMENT 



Quincy - I 3,863 SF comnnercial building on 24,200 SF lot. Fully 
occupied. Includes 90'xl 10' warehouse w/16' clearance. 35x20' 
refrigerated space with 2 loading doors and doctc. five private 
offices totalling 800 +/- SF. Modem, updated, fully occupied. Off 
Rte. 3A near Southern Artery. Offered at $ 1 ,350,000. 




Marshfield ^ Brand New Office Condos. Several units for sale. 
Ideal for medical/prof offices. 8 1 Car Pariong, Elevator, Handicap 
lavatories, Central Air, Basement Storage, Excellent access just 
off exit 1 2 on Route 3. 5 layouts to choose from. Call for floor 
plans. Prices start at $269,000, 




Qimicy- Multiple suites available in pnsmier Ctoa^ Colony Park loca- 
tiorx Four suites available of Z247 SF. 3,33 1 SP 3,500 SF. and 7, 1 00 SP 
Contiguous to 10,43 1 SF Amenitjes include hotels banking shuttle 
sen^e food ser«nce health dub and mons. Parking ratio is 3.5/ 1 .000 
BSf. Some turn-key space available. Flexible terms comoetfj/e -^ertL. 



FOR LEASE 




Quinqr - Gas and Auto Body Shop. 3,600-i-/- SF building. 
1 2' walls, 4 drive-in doors, steel tanks, full service Vita 
Root reporting system, Outside Kiosks, Gilbarco dispens- 
ers/5 Blend, Spray booth and frame machine. 



Quincy - Office Space for Lease. Premier space walking 
distance to Wollaston T Station. Space from 1 ,400+/- SF to 
1 2,400+/- SF full floor suites, featunng creative design within 
professional atmosphere. Below market rents. Full fee paid to 
cooperating brokers. 



Braintree - Office Condo for Sale - Currently a Law O'^'ice 
749 SF located at 409 Pond at Granite and Pond. Three execu- 
tive offices and an open admm/sales area good ^or 3 employees, 
Pnvate entrance and bath. Storage space m unit plus basement 
space. Pnce Reduced to $157,500. 




South Boston Seaport - 2,400 SF of Office/Commercial 
Space. Class B office Space. 2 onsite parking spaces. MBTA 
accessible via Silver Line from South Station. Sublet with 5 
years remaining. Below market @ $20/FT. 

1 



Weymouth - Industrial Complex featunng 3 Ind. buildings on 2 
+/- Acre comer loL Two attached buildings combine for a total of 
19,938 SF. 16,795+/- sf of warehouse/manufactunng, 3,143+/- sf 
of office space plus 1 ,500 SF storage bidg. Active indus. park near 
exits on Rte 3. High ceilings. Call for leasing terms. $1.75 Million. 



Raynham - Located on Rte. 44 Auto mile close to Rts. 24 & 
495. 1 4.523 +/- SF building on appnoxiamately 2,5 acnes featunng 
multiple sales offices, upper mezzanine offices, open show room & 
customer sen/ice area and large automotive service area. Offered 
at$l7.000/monthNNN. 



NEED CASH FAST! 

SELL NOW AT AUCTION! 

Call for a quick assessment! 



(6 I 7) 479-9000 • DJFIynn.com • 1 495 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 



Daniel 



Page 14 Tl^e Qiiincy Bvux Thursday, July 9, 2009 



Squantum Celebrates Centennial Fourth Of July Parade 





SWAN BOAT FLOAT with riders dressed in 1909-period attire captured second prize in Squan- 
tum's 100th anniversary Fourth of July Parade Saturday. 



COLOR GUARD from the Robert I. Nickerson American Legion Post leads the Squantum 
Fourth of July Parade which marked its 100th anniversary Saturday. 




SQUANTUM'S FOURTH OF July Parade honored 21 grand marshals who rtxle along the pa- 
rade route in grand style: in a Beantown Sightseeing Trolley. 



SQUAW ROCK FLOAT received third place in the Squantum Fourth of Jnly Parade which 
celebrated its lOOth anniversary Saturday. 




FIRST CHURCH OF Squantum's float delivered this message to parade watchers: 'All things 
Bright and Beautiful - God Made Them All.' Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble 




"CLOWN FAMILY" make a colorful scene marching in Squantum 's lOOth anniversary Fourth 
of July Parade Saturday. 




'TIFTY NIFTY UNITED STATES" was the third prize wmner in the marching category at SQUANTUM SEASIDE GARDENERS float featured a patriotic theme amid beautiful plants 
Satmtlay's 100th anniversary of the Squantum Fourth of July Parade. and flowers. 



Thursdav, Julv 9, 2009 Tlie Qi&incy Bvua. Page 15 



Quincy Retired Teachers Award $47,000 In Scholarships 



The Quincy Retired 
Teachers Association Schol- 
arship Fund recently pre- 
sented $47,000 in scholar- 
ships at its annual award 
ceremony held recently at 
the Sawyer Center at the 
Beechwood Knoll School. 

Quincy High School and 
North Quincy High School 
were each awarded 26 
scholarships. 

John W. Walsh, retired 
principal of North Quincy 
High School, with his son, 
John W. Walsh, Jr., present- 
ed five scholarships to stu- 



Ruel Mohnkern, vice 
president QRTASF, presided 
at the affair in the absence of 
Arthur Foster, president of 
QRTASC. 

QUINCY 

Scholarships and re- 
cipients from Quincy High 
School are: 

Harry A. and Louisa 
P. Beede Memorial Schol- 
arships: Vivian C. Pham, 



Matthew J . McGroarty. 

Mary T. MacDonald 
Memorial Scholarship: Al- 
doron M. Villena. 

Herman Noyes Memo- 
rial Scholarship: Ming L. 
Wood. 

Warren and Elsie Find- 
lay Memorial Scholarship: 
Richard G. Cheung. 

Arnold Rubin Memo- 
rial Scholarship: Renee E. 



Jessica T. Ngo, Michelle H. Murphy. 
Rizza and Shui Miao N Ge Dr. Carol Lee Griffen 

John W. Walsh Schol- Scholarship: Salma N 

arships: Elisa K. Lam, Xiao Goummih. 
Ting Zheng, Shu Wang, Joseph Streadwick Me- 



derUs from each high school Christopher M. McGroarty, morial Scholarship: Robert 



- a total of 10 scholarships. Petri nka N. Gjini. 

A scholarship to honor Charles Pratt Family 

Robert Mattsson, treasurer Scholarship: Lei Zhao, 

of the QRTA Scholarship Marion G. Rogers Me- 

Committee for eighteen morial Scholarship; Tony 

years, was awarded to a Yu. 

student from North Quincy Donald E. MacDonald 

High School. Memorial Scholarship: 



Memo- 
Annie 



J. McGroarty. 

Ruth Meisner 
rial Scholarship 
Tran. 

QRTA Alice Guilmartin 
Scholarship: Thuy M. Vo. 

Russell Eranio Memo- 
rial Scholarship: Phuong 



Thao Tammy Thai 

John and Winifred Fitz- 
patrick Memorial Scholar- 
ship: Irang V Vo. 

Mary Marr Parker Me- 
morial Scholarship: Leah 
E.Wood. 

Palmi.sano Fam- 

ily Scholarship Olivia E. 
Cruz. 

James S. Collins Memo- 
rial Scholarship Ihien-An 
Tonnu. 

Alfred and Ella Knap- 
ton Memorial Scholarship: 
Patrick D. Young. 

NORTH QUINCY 

Scht)larships and re- 
cipients from North Quincy 
High School are: 

Harry A. and Louisa P. 
Beede Memorial Scholar- 
ships: Jennifer Wu, Victo- 
ria Wong, Yao Sing Wong. 
Anna Lu. 

Bob Mattsson Scholar- 



ship Melissa Mullaney 

John W. Walsh Schol- 
arships: Helen Yung. Nora 
Abo-Sido. Jugera Sulej- 
mani. Iidmund lang, Jenna 
McAuliHe 

Walter Hittl Memorial 
Scholarship: Maggie Diu 

Louise Meisner Memo- 
rial Scholarship Monica 
Yao. 

North Quincy Class of 
1938 Scholarship: Frank 
Flora. 

Elizabeth and Esther 
Gizzarelli Memorial Schol- 
arship: Basem Sadaka. 

QRTA Martin Casey 
Memorial Scholarship Ja- 
son Mei 

QRTA Mabel Pratt Me- 
morial Scholarship Dan 
Chen. 

Mildfred B, Harrison 
Memorial Scholarship 
Phillip Wong. 



QRTA Dr. Henry Pat- 
erson Memorial Scholar- 
ship Christopher Jo 

QRTA Stella Krupka 
Memorial Scholarship: 
Lii\ Man 

QRTA Anna Robison 
Memorial Scholarship 
Nora Canavan 

QRTA Marv A. Bozoian 
Scholarship Iracv Li 

Althea Sawyer Memo- 
rial Scholarship Stacy 
Chu 

Marie Youngerman 
Memorial Scholarship 
Michael Baysa 

Lucy Maria Marr Me- 
morial Scholarship May 
lin 

(ieorge A. Wilson Me- 
morial Scholarship Ka 
Man Chan 

DiMascio Family Schol- 
arship: Frederick Li 



Quincy High School Scholarship Recipients 



North Quincy lli^li School Scholarship Rtcipitut 





QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL QRTA scholarship recipients (front row from left): Olivia Cruz, 

Leah Wood, Petrika Gjini, Robert McGroarty, Aldoron M. Villena. Second row: Matthew Mc- jyoRTH QUINCY HIGH School QRTA scholarship recipients (front row from left): Jenna 

Groarty, Ming L. Wood, Christopher M. McGroarty and Patrick Young. McAuUffe, Nora Abo-Sido, Jennifer Wu, Edmund Tang. Tracv Li. Second row: Lily Mann, 

^ "^' "^^'^ Frank Flora, Michael Baysa, Victoria Wong. 




MORE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS from Quincy High School: Front row, from left: Vivian 
C. Pham, Phuon Thao Tammy Thai, Shui Miao N. Gc, Shu Wang, Xiao Ting Zheng. Second 
row: Thien-An Tonnu, Thuy M. Vo, Jessica T. Ngo, Renee E. Murphy. 





MORE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS from North Quincv High ScHcm)!: Front row. from left: 
Monica Yao. May Tin, Philip Wong. Anna Lu. Noran t ana\an. Second row : Helen Yung. Fred- 
erick Li. Jason Mei. Maggie Diu. 




OTH^QiijCY HiSsSirecipiente: Fit>nt row, from left: Salma N. Goummih, Annie OTHER NORTH QIJINCY High School recipients: Front row. from left: Christopher Jo, 
TVan, TVang T. Vo, Jin Hong Lem. Second row: Tony Yu, Lei Zhao, Richard G. Cheung. Jugera Sulejman. and Basem Sadaka. 



Page 16 Tl&e Qvdncy Sim Thursday, July 9, 2009 



^llllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



I I I I 

CL'i' 




■ I 



II II 11 

1 1 ii_i 



Real 




TlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllliillllllllllllllllllllM 

More Tax Breaks For Homeowners In 2009 And Beyond 



(ARA) - Homeownership 
and green improvements 
will be more affordable for 
more Americans in 2009, 
thanks to several provisions 
in the American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act. The 
changes will put more mon- 
ey in taxpayers' pockets and 
allow homeowners to save 
thousands of dollars over 
the next several years. 



The First-time Homebuy- 
er Credit has been extended 
and increased to qualifying 
individuals who purchase a 
home in 2009 before Dec. 1 . 
First-time homebuyers are 
defined as those who have 
never owned a principal 
residence or who have not 
owned a principal residence 
at any time during the three 
years prior to the date of 




THIS 
ISA 



iMMMER 

By Samantha M azzotta 

Hot Weather 
Woes 



,Help! My win- 
I dow unit air 
conditToner keeps trip- 
ping the circuit breaker. 
Sometimes this happens 
right after I turn it on; 
sometimes it runs for a 
little while and then trips 
the breaker. It's the only 
thing I have to cool my 
apartment in the summer. 
- Shirley in Atlanta 

A^A circuit break- 
• er "trips" (the 



on another appliance that's 
plugged into the same circuit, 
an overload occurs. Here's 
how to find out what else 
is plugged into that circuit: 
Unplug the air conditioner, 
plug a lamp into each outlet 
and switch the circuit off and 
on while a friend watches to 
see if the lamp goes off and 
on. Do this with every out- 
let in your apartment, noting 
which outlet corresponds to 
which circuit. 

If another appliance is 
sharing the same circuit as 
the air conditioner, plug that 
appliance into an outlet be- 



purchase. 

For 2008 and 2009 tax 
returns, the credit is equal to 
10 percent of the home pur- 
chase price, up to $8,000. 
It phases out when modi- 
fied adjusted gross income 
is $75,000 for an individual 
or $150,000 for joint filers. 
Married taxpayers must 
both qualify as "first-time 
homebuyers" in order to re- 
ceive the full credit. 

Taxpayers who claimed 
the full $8,000 First-time 
Homebuyer Credit on their 
2008 federal return cannot 
claim it on their 2009 return. 
Those who have not claimed 
the credit should determine 
which year to use it based 
on your income. If you 
expect your income to de- 
crease in 2009, it will likely 
make more sense to claim 
the credit on your 2009 re- 
turn rather than your 2008 
return. 



The only scenario in 
which the credit must be paid 
back is if the home ceases to 
be the owners' principal res- 
idence within 36 months of 
the purchase date. Then the 
full credit amount must be 
repaid on the federal return 
for that tax year. 

The credit was initially 
created to be claimed after 
a home is purchased, but 
the Obama administration 
is now allowing qualifying 
taxpayers to use it to cover 
certain purchasing costs. 
Homebuyers with mortgages 
backed by the Federal Hous- 
ing Administration may be 
eligible to receive advances 
on the credit, which could 
be used for closing costs, 
fees and additional money 
for a down payment beyond 
the FHA's required 3.5 per- 
cent minimum. 

Anyone can apply for 
an FHA -backed mortgage, 



regardless of income. How- 
ever, there are limits on the 
size of the mortgage, and 
lenders may charge a fee for 
the credit. Some states are 
also offering similar pro- 
grams. 

The new stimulus plan 
also includes tax credits 
equal to 30 percent, up to 
$1,500, for certain energy- 
efficient improvements to 
residential properties. The 
Residential Energy Property 
Credit can be claimed on 
2009 and 2010 returns for 
improvements such as add- 
ing insulation or installing 
energy-efficient windows, 
doors, or heating and air 
conditioning systems. Big- 
ger improvements involving 
alternative energy equip- 
ment such as solar hot wa- 
ter headers, geothermal heat 
pumps and wind turbines 
may be claimed on 2009 
to 2016 returns under the 



Residential Energy Efficient 
Property Credit. 

In addition to homeown- 
er tax breaks, the 2009 act 
includes several new or in- 
creased credits and deduc- 
tions. You can easily leam 
which provisions you may 
qualify for on your 2009 
taxes by answering simple 
questions in TaxACT. Pre- 
view versions of TaxACT 
2009 software will be avail- 
able in October, allowing 
you to plan ahead and get 
a head start on your return. 
When you're ready to pre- 
pare and file your 2009 re- 
turn, TaxACT will help you 
complete the correct forms 
for the credits in a matter of 
minutes. 

Read the details of the 
American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009 
at www.lRS.gov and leam 
more about TaxACT at 
www.TaxACT.com. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 



Money-Saving Tips For Purchasing Replacement Windows 



breaker switch flips open) ,o„g,„g ^^ ^^^^y^^^ ^-^^^-^ 
when the power load on its jf ^^^ ^^ conditioner is 

circmt goes past the limit ^^^ ^^^^ appliance on the 

- meaning too much elec- ^.j^^^^jj ^^ -^ ^^-^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 

tricity is flowing through breaker, contact the apart- 

that circuit. The circuit ^^^^^^ maintenance office. 



breaker is a critical safety 
mechanism. Without it, 
a circuit might overheat 
and cause a fire. It's also 
a warning mechanism, so 
when the circuit frequently 
"trips" when you're using 
an appliance that draws 
a lot of power, like an air 
conditioner, a space heater 
or a microwave oven, you 
should pay attention. 

The most likely cause of 
your problem is that the air 
conditioner is using most of 
the amperage allotted to that 
circuit, and when you turn 



It needs to make sure that 
the circuit itself isn't faulty. 

HOME TIP: To cool a 
room more efficiently, don't 
turn the air conditioner on 
full blast right away. In- 
stead, let it run at a low or 
medium setting for about 
20 minutes so the condenser 
has time to work, then tum 
it up. 

Send questions or home- 
repair tips to homeguru2000@ 
hotmail.com, or write This Is 
a Hammer, do King Features 
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



(ARA) - Energy effi- 
ciency has gained national 
importance and window 
replacement is recognized 
as one pathway to aid in en- 
ergy independence and the 
reduction of harmful global 
emissions. 

Choosing replacement 
windows with energy-sav- 
ing benefits is simple and 
the federal government also 
made it less expensive for 
homeowners with the sign- 
ing of the American Recov- 
ery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009. 

The bill includes the op- 
portunity for homeowners to 
claim a tax credit of 30 per- 
cent of the cost of eligible 
energy-efficient products 
to a maximum of $1,500 
per household for 2009 and 
2010 combined when used 
for remodeling and replace- 
ment. According to the IRS, 
a tax credit is a dollar-for- 
dollar reduction in your tax 
liability and can be deduct- 
ed directly from your taxes 
owed. 



While energy efficient 
replacement windows are 
included in this tax credit, 
not all replacement windows 
will qualify. Paul Delahunt, 
president of Renewal by An- 
dersen, says, given the new 
tax credit, now is the best 
time to replace your leaky, 
worn-out windows. But he 
also cautions homeowners 
to do their homework to 
make sure the windows they 
purchase will qualify. 

To qualify, windows 
must provide high levels of 
energy efficiency in two cat- 
egories: reduced heat loss 
and reduced heat gain. The 
measurement for heat loss 
is called U-Factor and the 
measurement for heat gain is 
called Solar Heat Gain Co- 
efficient, or SHGC. To meet 
the performance require- 
ments, the window or door 
must have both a U-Factor 
and SHGC rating equal to or 
less than 0.30 in all climate 
zones in the U.S. 

When comparing win- 
dows for energy perfor- 



mance - and the 2009/2010 
tax credit — be sure to check 
the National Fenestration 
Rating Council (NFRC) la- 
bel that is displayed on the 
product. This label displays 
the U-Factor and SHGC rat- 
ings for the window or pa- 
tio door. If the product does 
not have this label, then the 
unit does not have a certified 
NFRC value. 

Qualifying replacement 
windows must be purchased 
and installed in a primary 
residence between January 
1, 2009 and December 31, 
2010. While quality installa- 
tion is a critical component 
of any successful window 
replacement project, instal- 
lation costs are not included 
in the 2009/2010 tax credit. 
Your sales receipt should 
break out qualifying product 
costs separately. 

In addition to your sales 
receipt, you will also need 
to save the NFRC label 
from each window or the 
Manufacturer's Certifica- 
tion Statement with your tax 



documents. 

Renewal by Andersen 
makes it easy for homeown- 
ers to take advantage of the 
new federal tax credit with 
its extensive selection of 
windows and patio doors 
with glass packages that 
meet or exceed the perfor- 
mance criteria to be eligible 
for the credit. 

In fact, Delahunt says, 
virtually all Renewal by 
Andersen windows with 
High-Performance Lx)w-E4 
SmartSun glass are eligible 
for the tax credit. These 
same windows with Smart- 
Sun glass are up to 47 per- 
cent more energy efficient 
in winter and up to 70 per- 
cent more energy efficient in 
summer compared to ordi- 
nary dual pane glass ~ mak- 
ing a big impact on reducing 
your energy bills. 

Homeowners interested 
in learning more about Re- 
newal by Andersen products 
that may qualify can visit 
w w w.renewalby andersen . 
com or call (800) 630-5838. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 



Two luxury one bedroom rentals being offered as affordable 
housing lottery at Quarry Meadows, 328 Copeland Street, Units 
2C & 3C, Quincy, MA! Requirements: Local preferences; 
asset limit of $75,000; Income Guideline- 1 person @$46,300; 
2 persons @$52,950. Rent @$913/month each unit without 
utilities. Application deadline July 20th! Lottery Drawing July 27th! 

For more information call Lottery Agent, Affordable Housing 

Lotteries, LLC at (781) 585-2050 or email: 

info@affordablehousinglotteries.com. 

To download Lottery Guidelines & 

Application- http://ci .quincy .ma.us 

www.affordablehousinglotteries .com 

lOUAL HOUSINO . 

OPPORTUNITY www.massaccesshousmgregistry.com 




CityWew leal Estate 




Patrick J. Mulkern 

Working with Buyers and Sellers. 
Call me for a FREE opinion of Value! 

Office 617-773-5588 • Cell 617-590-9168 
www.cityviewrealestatc.com 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 




SERVICE ^iD MOBILE 

AUTO • HOME • BUSINESS 

•DEAOBOLTS INSTALLED 

• LOCKS REKEYED 
•DOOR CLOSERS 

• PANIC HARDWARE 
•AUTO KEYS FITTED 

VISIT OUR SHOWROOMl 

755so.ARnirr,QuiNa 
472-2177 



Thursday, July 9, 2009 The Quincy Sun Page 1 7 



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1 1 1 1 




II II 1 1 
1 1 1 1.1 



: L> 



Real 




lllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllM 

Smart Strategies To Increase Home Sale Profits 



(ARA) - The proposition 
of selling a home is getting 
better with each passing 
day according to a recently 
released report from the Na- 
tional Association of Real- 

Dollars 
and $en$e 

by David Uffington 

Low-Cost 

Netbooks Have 

Some Drawbacks 

The netbook craze has 
swung into high gear as 
more and more people tote 
these small, inexpensive de- 
vices everywhere they go. 
Designed for Web brows- 
ing and e-mailing, netbooks 
have a lot to recommend 
them, but they're not minia- 
ture laptops. Before you buy, 
consider the pros and cons. 

Pro: 

• Relatively inexpensive 
~ There are a few now at 
the $300 to $400 mark, with 
most not going over $500. 

• Easy to carry ~ Net- 
books are lightweight, which 
is helpful if you travel fre- 
quently. Most netbooks are 
in the 2-3 pound range. 

• Good for the basics - If 
your computer usage is lim- 
ited to checking e-mail and 
surfing the Internet, a net- 
book is something to con- 
sider. 

Con; 

• Small screen - Net- 
books come in two gen- 
eral screen sizes, 8.9 inches 
and 10.1 inches. No matter 
which you choose, they're 
still small. If you spend more 
than an hour reading online, 
you'll want the larger of the 
two sizes. 

• Small typing pad - If 
you're going from a full- 
size computer keyboard to a 
netbook, check the feel of a 
number of netbooks and de- 



tors. If you need to sell your 
home, a few smart strategies 
can help you increase your 
profits. 

A number of real estate 
pundits are pointing to the 

cide if you can easily make 
the switch. If you do a lot of 
writing, extended use of the 
small pad could be a prob- 
lem. 

• No DVD player - If 
you have beloved software 
on CD, how is it going to 
be installed on a netbook? If 
it's paid-for software, many 
companies have downloads 
available from their sites. 
Not all products, however, 
are available this way. 

• Battery life - This is a 
big issue, one where some of 
the netbook manufacturers 
have fallen short. "Cell" size 
seems to be the current form 
of advertising how long a 
battery will last, but don't be 
fooled. A "six-cell" battery 
could be 4,400 milliampere- 
hour, or it could be 5,200 or 
5,900 mAH, a big difference 
in how long the battery will 
work. 

Additionally, no one can 
accurately predict just how 
long a battery will last with- 
out knowing the specifics 
of how the netbook will be 
used. Beware getting a ma- 
chine with a short run-time 
battery and expect to up- 
grade it later. That upgraded 
battery could cost nearly 40 
percent of the cost of the 
netbook. 

Best bet: Check online re- 
views by actual users before 
you buy. That will tell you 
more, in most cases, than all 
the slick advertising. 

David Uffington regrets tfuit he 
cannot personally answer reader 
questions, hut will incorporate 
them into his column whenever 
possible. Write to him in care oj 
King Features Weekly Service. 
P.O. Box 536475. Orlando. FL 
32853-6475, or send e-mail to col- 
umnreply@gmail.com . 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



recent decline in home in- 
ventory and the fact that 
interest rates have increased 
on the 30-year fixed mort- 
gage as a positive endorse- 
ment of a healthier housing 
market. 

Joanne Sebby, a licensed 
real estate broker, and oper- 
ator of a local Two Men and 
a Truck moving franchise, 
believes she's benefitting 
from what could be the start 
of a real estate "bloom," if 
not a full "boom." 

"Bargain hunters are 
beginning to make moves 
on homes that are still way 
undervalued" Sebby says. 
"The key for sellers is to get 
creative in marketing your 
home's offerings so you can 
become one of those homes 
that get a look, and hopeful- 
ly sell your house in a rea- 
sonable amount of time." 

While the real estate out- 
look is the best it's been in 
recent memory, home loans 
are still more difficult to 
come by and home values 



are down an average of 20 
percent, according to the 
NAR. It's likely that if you 
are selling your house to- 
day, you'll likely do so at 
the cost of higher profits 
that you may have realized 
in healthier markets. 

Regardless, Sebby sug- 
gests there are a number of 
creative ways home sellers 
can mitigate their losses on 
the sale. 

"Most home sales in- 
volve some service-oriented 
companies such as moving 
companies, carpet cleaners, 
painters or other services," 
she says. 

Sebby suggests sellers 
need to think of their bottom 
line when selecting service 
companies in order to maxi- 
mize profits on their home, 
and consider pitching in to 
keep costs down. 

"Determine what bud- 
get you have to work with 
and be up front with the 
people providing you with 
estimates," Sebby says. "I'll 



often counsel people who 
call our moving company to 
maybe box and label every- 
thmg themselves, or have 
all the boxes collected in 
the room closest to the front 
door If there's a number we 
have to work with, we'll 
make suggestions on how 
to make it work to suit their 
needs." 

Sebby suggests using the 
same tactics with home in- 
spectors, painters or other 
service personnel. 

"Do a little research and 
find what portion of the 
work you can comfortably 
do yourself. If you're sav- 
ing money along the way 
it's going to impact your 
profit on the house. A little 
bit here and there can really 
add up." 

Brig Sorber, president 
and chief executive officer 
of Two Men and a Truck 
franchised moving company 
- believes the current hous- 
ing market provides more 
opportunity than risk. 



"As a business owner, 
you look at your operations 
a little closer and ideally 
come away with a clearer 
understanding of what your 
company needs to do to stay 
com[5etitive." Sorber says. 
"The same pnnciple applies 
to homeowners looking to 
sell In an optimal market, 
a buyer may just scan the 
Internet, find a icKal mover 
and sign on the dotted line 
Today's customer is more 
aware; they've done com- 
petitive research on what 
to expect from a legitimate 
moving company, and that 
benefits those of us who val- 
ue long-term relationships 
with our customers " 

Chances are, even sell- 
ers with the best intentions 
won't realize the full value 
of their home in today's 
market However, as Sebby 
suggests, there's no harm in 
optimizing your profits with 
a little extra effort and a do- 
it-yourself approach. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 



The Guide To A Safe And Stylish Bathroom 



Realty Pros 




Buying, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY - (617) 328-3200 

On the Web visit McFarlandproperties.com 




(ARA) - The bathroom, 
often a place of relaxation 
and comfort, can also be a 
dangerous space. Whether 
your family members are 3 
years old or 93, the risk of 
getting hurt in the bathroom 
is the same for all ages. 

According to the U.S. 
Census Bureau, the number 
of multigenerational house- 
holds, consisting of three or 
more generations of a fam- 
ily, is on the rise in America 
— up to nearly four million. 
And, creating a safe home 
that meets everyone's needs 
while still being stylish can 
be difficult. 

So whether it's bath time 
for your little ones or their 
grandparents, the following 
tips will help you to create 
a safe bathroom that is fash- 
ionable and inviting. 



T\ib Lock Down 

Getting into and out of 
the tub safely is key to a re- 
laxing bath experience for 
both children and adults. To 
prevent slipping, easy-to- 
install and stylish Premium 
SecureLock Tub Grips from 
Home Care by Moen are es- 
sential in lending a stable, 
helping hand. The design 
features an easy-locking 
lever to ensure a tight fit to 
most tubs without harming 
the tub surface. An ergo- 
nomically designed handle 
features an anti-slip grip to 
provide optimal support and 
comfort. Plus the innovative 
design offers easy, no-tool 
installation and removal in 
seconds. 

Splish Splash 
I Was Taking a Bath 
Neglecfing your tub 




OnhjQ^ 




Abigail Adams 

Serious About Selling 
The South Shore 



Jayne magown 
Owner Broker 
RE Instructor 



Buyers & Seller Representation 
Residential Sales & Rentals 
Internet Marketing 
Quincy-Norwell-Marshfield 

61 7-471 -ySTS 

VVWW.C21 ablgaiiadams.com 

M^aiCAdims lUaC^ate ScfiooC 

CiassMi In Sal— p <won's. Brokers. Contimiino Ed 



1 


GRANITE GROUP 


W^ 


JULIE BERBERAN 

r.dl6l7 285-2W4 
Office 617 77^2020 cvt 121 
Fa,x 61^786 7921 
jullebcrhcran(« aol torn 

7 Ik-ale Siieei, Quiikx, MA 02170 


imm 



while it's filling up may lead 
to accidental overflow, leav- 
ing a hazardous pool of wa- 
ter on the floor. An alarm is 
the perfect way to alert im- 
patient bathers - young and 
old — when it's bath time 
Designed in many shapes 
and colors to coordinate with 
any decor, the bath alarm 
notifies you when the water 
has reached its limit. Some 
models, such as the Primo 
Bathtub Thermometer, also 
include a water temperature 
screen to help keep sensitive 
fingers or toes from getting 
burned. 

Put an End 
To Slipping and Sliding 
Slips and slides are fun 
for outside play on hot days, 
however, they can easily 
be created in your bathtub 
if bath treads are not prop- 
erly placed on the bottom 
of the tub. Bath treads pro- 
vide stability and reduce 
slippage while showenng. 
These simple stnps are in- 
expensive, come in differ- 
ent, decorative shapes such 
as stars, shells and fish, and 
can be found at any home or 
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Shower Safely 
Whether it is shower 
time for toddlers or teenag- 
ers, parents or patnarchs, a 



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fect option for everyone. 
Creative Storage 
and Decorating 

As one of the smallest 
rcxims in the home, the bath- 
room can become the culprit 
of disorganization and trip- 
ping hazards. To get a grip 
on organization, install an 
over-the-toilet shelving unit 
for extra storage. Tr\ per- 
sonalizing each individual's 
space in the bathri)t>m by 
designating drawers or as- 
signing colorful bath tov\- 
els for shower time. Add- 
ing bathroom accessones 
such as towel rings and robe 
hooks can help coordinate 
the rtx^m and also keep wet 
towels and clothes off the 
floor. 

Lighting The Way 
To Style and Safety 
Midnight trips to the 
bathroom are common for 
many including children, 
expectant mothers and the 
eldedy. Keeping a night 
light plugged into an outlet 
in the bathroom can keep 
sleepy heads awake and pre- 
vent accidents. Some night- 
lights are mofion activated 
and some come on as soon 
as light disappears. 

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Page 18 The Quincy Sun Thunday, July 9, 2009 



American Legion Regular Season Ends July 12 

Quincy & Morrisette In 
Contention For Playoffs 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

The clock is ticking for 
Morrisette and Quincy Le- 
gion in their quests for a 
spot in the five-team Dis- 
trict 6 East American Le- 
gion playoffs. The 22-game 
regular season is scheduled 
to conclude on July 12, and 
as of press time, both teams 
still held a legitimate shot 
at making the post-season 
tournament. 

As of July 6, Morrisette, 
which finished last week 
with a disappointing 0-4 
record, including losses to 
Stoughton (9-5), Cohas- 
set (6-5), Milton (5-1) and 
Jamaica Plain (9-5 in extra 
innings), was in third-place 
in the ten-team league with 
an 8-8 overall record. Mor- 
risette has six games remain- 
ing on its schedule and that 
includes two games against 
city rival Quincy Legion. 

Quincy Legion, currently 
in seventh place with a 5-10 
overall record, has turned it 
on as of late, and last week 
finished at 2-1 with victo- 
ries over Braintree (4-2) and 
Hyde Park (7-0) and lost to 
Milton, 9-2. Quincy Legion 
has seven games remaining 
on the docket. 



The overall District 6 East 
American Legion standings 
are as follows: Milton, 13-1; 
Jamaica Plain, 12-4; Mor- 
risette, 8-8; Braintree, 7-5; 
Weymouth, 7-6; Cohasset, 
6-5; Holbrwk, 5-8-1; Quin- 
cy, 5-10; Stoughton, 3-11-2 
and Hyde Park, 2-10-1. 

"We had a tough week 
and really didn't get any 
breaks, but with six games 
left on our schedule, which 
for us ends on Saturday, and 
including two against Quin- 
cy, we have a shot at get- 
ting into the playoffs," said 
Morrisette 's Bill Marchand. 
"There is a lot of games 
left to be played by the 
other nine teams as the bad 
weather has cancelled many 
games this season, and with 
some of the teams below us 
in the standings still hav- 
ing yet reach that 22-game 
requirement, it could be an 
interesting week. There are 
sure to be a lot of double- 
headers as these teams try 
and get all their games in by 
July 12. 

"There is even a chance, 
if certain scenarios play out, 
that both us and Quincy 
could find ourselves playing 
in the playoffs." 



For Morrisette, last week 
was frustrating to say the 
least. The team opened the 
week by dropping a 9-5 deci- 
sion to Stoughton; followed 
that up with a tough-to-take 
6-5 loss to Cohasset; played 
top-ranked Milton close be- 
fore dropping a 5-1 game 
and closed out the week 
with a 9-5 extra-inning loss 
to Jamaica Plain. 

"That was a tough week," 
Marchand added. "We lost 
a game in the heavy fog to 
Cohasset, played Milton 
close but came up short and 
after scoring late to send the 
game to extras against JP 
we gave up four runs in the 
eighth inning and lost. We 
are still hitting, but we need 
to get healthy pitching-wise 
for us to continue to make a 
push for a playoff spot." 

After Sunday, the final 
day of the regular season, 
this muddled District 6 East 
American Legion playoff 
picture will be settled; Mor- 
risette, Quincy Legion and 
the rest of the eight teams 
vying for one of the five cov- 
eted spots just need Mother 
Nature to do her part and let 
it happen. 




QUINCY RESIDENT and former EC High football coach Jim Cotter (center) helped kick 
ofTthe 12*^ Annual Jimmy Kennedy Memorial Run for ALS (Squirrel Run XII) on June 13 at 
Pageant Field. Among those who participated in the race festivities, whose proceeds benefit 
The Angel Fund, a non-profit organization dedicated to funding ALS research at the Cecil B. 
Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, were, from the left. Dr. Robert H. Brown, Di- 
rector of the Cecil B. Day Laboratory; Mayor Thomas Koch, Cotter, Rich Kennedy, President 
of The Angel Fund and race organizer and Todd DelVecchio, Director of The Angel Fund. 



NQHS, QHS 2009 
Fall TVyout Information 



Wins Over Hanson & Canton 



QYB'S 14-Under Team 2-0 In 
District 8 Tournament Play 



The Quincy Youth Base- 
ball 14-Under All-Star base- 
ball team opened play in the 
District 8 Travel All-Star 
tournament playoffs with a 
2-0 record. Quincy knocked 
off Hanson (8-2) and Can- 
ton (5-0) and they were 
scheduled to play against 
Cohasset in a battle of unde- 
feated teams Tuesday night 
when the team's quest for a 
district championship was 
to continue. 

In the District 8 playoff 
opener, Quincy 's Tommy 
McDonald threw a com- 
plete game four-hitter, al- 
lowing two unearned runs 
and striking out six Hanson 
batters. McDonald received 
offensive support from 
Rudy Tryon (three hits, 
two RBI, two runs scored), 
Dan Cobban (three hits) and 
Matt Davis (four stolen bas- 
es, two runs scored). Patrick 
Verhault (RBI), Josh Hay- 
ward (hit), Andrew Jaehnig 
(hit) and Dave Joyce (RBI) 



also contributed to Quincy's 
offensive attack. 

Defensively, Jason 

Pekkinen (third base), 
Joyce, Verhault and Cobban 
played well in the infield 
against Hanson. 

In Game Two against 
Canton, Dan Cobban fol- 
lowed up with a solid pitch- 
ing performance of his own 
as Quincy won, 5-0. Cob- 
ban shutout Canton by al- 
lowing just four singles and 
striking out seven batters; 
he also picked off a runner 
at second base and hel{>ed 
his own cause with a RBI 
single and a sacrifice fly. 

Patrick Verhault finished 
with two hits and two RBI, 
Mike Gallotta had two hits, 
Andrew Currie singled , stole 
four bases and scored three 
runs, Matt Davis doubled 
and Rudy Tryon and Josh 
Hayward each had a hit to 
lead the Quincy offense. 

Defensively, Hayward 
made three nice plays in 



right field; Brian Fahey 
played well at third base 
and Andrew Jaehnig threw 
out a potential base stealer 
in the first inning. 

Earlier this summer, the 
QYB Under- 14 team scored 
an exciting 3-1 -comeback 
victory over Kingston in the 
All-Star Summer Baseball 
League. Dan Cobban erased 
a 1-0 deficit with a game- 
winning three-run homer 
to leftfield. Rudy Tryon 
pitched four shutout innings; 
Mike (jallotto picked up the 
win in relief and Tommy 
McDonald came in to pick 
up the save in relief. 

Matt Davis (two hits, 
run), Tryon (hit), Verhault 
(hit) and TJ Hobin (hit) 
contributed to the win at the 
plate. Brian Fahey played a 
solid game at third base. 

(Team information sub- 
mitted by Coach Mark 
Jaehnig) 



The rainy weather may 
make it seem like summer 
has yet to arrive, but it ac- 
tually has, and before you 
know it the school year will 
be starting up again, and 
with that so will the 2009 
fall sports season. 

The Quincy Public 
School Athletic Depart- 
ment has already organized 
and set-up dates, locations, 
times, contact information 
and doctor physical times 
regarding tryouts for the up- 
coming fall season. The fol- 
lowing is a list the prevalent 
information that is needed 
for interested and return- 
ing student-athletes who are 
planning on participating in 
high school sports such as 
football, boys' golf, boys 
and girls soccer, girls' vol- 
leyball and cross-country. 
North Quincy 
High School 

Football: Head Coach 
Jim Connor, northquincy- 
football@yahoo.com, 617- 
838-9720. Tryouts start 
on 8/24/09 at 8 a.m. in the 
NQHS Gym. 

Boys Golf: Coach Bob 
Doyle, rpdoyle521@com- 
cast.net, 617-481-1590. 
Tryouts start on 8/24/09 at 



Course. 

Boys Soccer: Head Coach 
Rich Hanlon, whhanlon® 
yahoo.com, 617-827-8697. 
Tryouts start on 8/27/09 at 
9 a.m. at Atlantic Middle 
School. 

Girls Soccer: Head 
Coach Paul Bregoli, 617- 
471-2867. Tryouts start on 
8/24/09 at 7 a.m. at Pageant 
Field. 

Girls Volleyball: Head 
Coach Kerry Ginty, kginty @ 
hotmail .com , 6 1 7-293-2705 . 
Tryouts start on 8/3 1/09 at 9 
a.m. in the NQHS Gym. 

Cross-Country: Head 
Coach Geoff Hennessy, 
henndog89@netscape.net, 
617-510-1456. Tryouts start 
on 8/27/09 at 8 a.m. at Pag- 
eant Field. 

Quincy High School 

Football: Head Coach 
Bill Reardon, billrear- 
don22@comcast.net, 508- 
747-2771. Tryouts start on 
8/24/09 at 8 a.m. at Pageant 
Field. 

Boys Golf: Head Coach 
Lou Venturelli, qhscoachv® 
yahoo.com, 781-803-3724. 
Tryouts start on 8/3 1/09 at 8 
a.m. at Furnace Brook Golf 
Course. 

Boys Soccer: Head 



markspendlove® yahoo, 
com, 6 17-72 1-1402. Tryouts 
start on 8/25/09 at 8 a.m. on 
the Varsity Field. 

Girls Soccer: Head Coach 
Don Martin, donsoccer® 
verizon.net, 617-328-5655. 
Tryouts start on 8/20/09 at 3 
p.m. at Perkins. 

Girls Volleyball: Head 
Coach Jacqui Niosi, coach- 
niosi@gmail.com, 617- 
835-4225. Tryouts start on 
8/27/09 at 1 p.m. at Broad- 
meadows Middle School. 

Cross-Country: Head 
Coach Geoff Hennessy, 
henndog89@ netscape .net , 
617-510-1456. Tryouts start 
on 8/27/09 at 8 a.m. at Pag- 
eant Field. 
Doctor/Sports Physicals 

North Quincy HS: 8/7/09 
and 8/21/09 from 8:30 a.m. 
until 12 Noon and 9/18/09 
from 8:30-9:30 a.m. 

Quincy HS: 8/14/09 and 
8/28/09 from 8:30 a.m. until 
12 Noon and 9/18/09 from 
10-11 a.m. 

(Note: All Quincy Pub- 
lic School student/athletes 
must have a current physi- 
cal exam and a white ath- 
letic permit card signed by 
the school nurse.) 



11 a.m. at Presidents Golf Coach Mark Spendlove, 



Presidents Ladies 
Association Golf Results 



QRD Announces Openings 
For Girls Lacrosse Clinic 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department (QRD) and 
Bany J. Welch, Director, 
announced Tuesday that the 
department still has open- 
ings available for its 2009 



Girls Lacrosse summer clin- 
ic, which will be held July 
13-17. 

This clinic is for girls 
entering grades 4-9 and will 
be held from 8:30 a.m. to 



12:30 p.m. Cost of the clinic 
is $75. 

For additional informa- 
tion, contact the QRD at 
617-376-1394. 



The Presidents Ladies 
Association held two events 
over the June 27-28 weekend 
at Presidents Golf Course. 

The following are the re- 
sults from those two days of 
golf 

Saturday, June 27-Putts 

In Division I action, 
Rosemary Jennings finished 
in first-place, Chris Fitzpat- 
rick took second and E)iane 
Petaskiewicz and Karen 
Ryan tied for third-place. 

In Division II, Sandra 
Jordan finished in first-place, 
Moe Savage and Mai Nestor 



tied for second and Diane 
Burke took third-place. 

In Division III, Paula 
Murphy finished first fol- 
lowed by Janet McDonough 
and Rosie Cannon tied for 
second and Maureen Janik 
finishing third. 

Sunday, June 28-Stroke 
Play 

In Division I, Linda Gou- 
let took 1" Gross with a 
round of 74. 

Marijke Alsbach finished 
in 2"** Gross with a score of 82 
and Carol Mather took 1" Net 
honors with a round of 7 1 . 



In Division II, Mary Von 
Freymarm shot an 88 to earn 
1*' Gross honors. 

Gail Keefe took 1« Net 
with a score of 71 and (Thris 
O'Neill finished in 2~* Net 
with a score of 75. 

In Division III, Carol 
Maglio shot a 104 to take 
1" Gross and Rita Callahan 
shot a 78 to take PNet. 

Notes: Gail Keefe had a 
hole-in-one on the 60-yard 
par-3. She used a pitching 
wedge. Witnesses included 
Pat Hagan, Patty Boutilier 
and Mary Von Freymann. 



Ihursda>,.lul> 9. 20O9 TheQlUncySml Page I » 



39 City Champions Qualified For State Meet 

Four Quincy Qualifiers Win Titles 
At Hershey's State Championships 



In the middle of June, 
the Quincy Recreation De- 
partment held its annual 
Hershey's Track and Field 
City Championships. Thir- 
ty-nine of these Quincy city 
champions qualified for 
the Hershey's State Meet, 
which was held on June 27 
at Nashoba Regional High 
School in Bolton, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Out of the 39 Quincy 
city champions, four of 
the qualifiers won the state 
championships in their re- 
spective events. 

In the Boys 11-12 divi- 
sion, Quincy 's Michael 
Mullaney won the state title 
in the 800-meter run with a 
time of 2:36.81. 

In the Boys 13-14 divi- 
sion, Quincy's Mark Chan- 
dler won the state title in the 
Standing Long Jump with a 
distance of eight feet, four 
inches. 

In the Girls 9-10 divi- 
sion, Quincy's Lauren Pet- 
rie won the state title in the 
Standing Long Jump with 
a distance of five feet, 11 
inches. 

In the Girls 11-12 di- 



vision, Quincy's Leonor 
Guardado won the state 
title in the Softball throw 
with a distance of 107 feet, 
two inches. 

These four state cham- 
pions will have their times 
and distances submitted to 
the Regional District Coor- 
dinator of District 6, which 
includes the six New Eng- 
land states and four of the 
Canadian Provinces; the 
best competitors in each 
event from the District 6 
region will then advance to 
the North American Final 
Meet in Hershey, Pennsyl- 
vania on August 1 . 

Other Quincy residents 
who placed in the top-five 
in their respective events 
at the Hershey's State Meet 
on June 27 included: 

Daniel Sherwin, Kyle 
Cabezas, Matthew Bright 
and Michael Doyle as 
members of the Boys 9-10, 
4 X 100-meter relay team; 
Gamaliel Pemberton in 
the Boys 11-12, 100-meter 
dash; Gamaliel Pemberton. 
Justm McGaffigan, Brian 
Regan and Michael Mul- 
laney as members of the 



Boys 11-12,4 X 100-meter 
relay team; Mark Chandler 
in the Boys 13-14, 100-me- 
ter dash; Katherine Dor- 
mady in the Girls 9- 10, Soft- 
ball Throw; Bridget Flynn, 
Bridget Durgin, Naomi 
Kane and Olivia Affannato 
as members of the Girls 
9-10, 4 X 100-meter relay 
team; Meaghan Murphy in 
the Girls 11-12, 100-me- 
ter dash; Rachel Roach in 
the Girls 11-12, 200-meter 
dash; Emily Bryson in the 
Girls 11-12, 800-meter run; 
Meaghan Murphy, Rachel 
Roach, Lexi Richards and 
Leonor Guardado as mem- 
bers of the Girls 11-12, 4 
X 100-meter relay team 
and Emma Campbell in 
the Girls 13-14, 100-meter 
dash. 

Other Quincy city cham- 
pions who competed in the 
Hershey's State Meet were: 

Brendan Fitzpatrick, 
Matthew Roach, Max Iwua- 
la. Kingston Iwuala. Julia 
Bryson, Mairead O'Brien, 
Marissa Balsamo, Libby 
Doyle, Lauren Thome and 
Molly Brown. 




QUINCY YOUTH SOCCER'S Under- 14 Girls Travel team recently was awarded the 2009 
South Shore Soccer League's Girls Division III Sportsmanship Award. Team members in- 
cluded, front row from left, Amanda Leahy, Jennifer Scamici, Mairead O'Brien and Colleen 
Andrews. Second row: Coach Jim Sheridan, Ana Gallotto, Mary Beth Stravin, Courtney Sheri- 
dan, Stacey (lallagher and Coach Karin Sheridan. Third row: Maggie Mahoney, Alexandra 
Long, Kayla Sugrue and Erin Healy. Not pictured: Seanna Villarreal, Erika Histen, Kelsey 
Laforest, Christine Kelliher and Katie Burke. 

QYS U14 Girls Team 
Given Sportsmanship Award 



The Quincy Youth Soccer 
Under- 14 Girls Travel team, 
known as the Spartans, were 
recently awarded the South 
Shore Soccer League's an- 
nual Sportsmanship Award, 
given to the team that best 
exemplified sportsmanship 
during the 2009 spring trav- 
el season. 

"We are extremely 
proud of this team that ex- 
emplified great sportsman- 
ship throughout the 2009 
spring travel season, which 



showed from their hard 
work throughout the winter 
training sessions from Janu- 
ary through March and this 
spring season," said coach- 
es Jim and Karin Sheridan. 
"We would like to congrat- 
ulate them and wish all the 
girls a great summer, and 
good luck to the returning 
players for the fall season 
and the girls that are mov- 
ing on to try out for their 
high school teams, which 
include Qumcy and North 



Quincy High Schools and 
Fontbonne Academy." 

The roster for the U14 
Spartans included Amanda 
Leahy, Jennifer Scamici , 
Mairead O'Brien, Colleen 
Andrews, Ana Gallotto, 
Mary Beth Stravin. Court- 
ney Sheridan, Stacey Gal- 
lagher, Maggie Mahoney, 
Alexandra Long, Kayla 
Sugrue, Erin Healy, Seanna 
Villarreal, Erika Histen. 
Kelsey Laforest. Chnstine 
Kelliher and Katie Burke. 



Sun Sports 





QYS UNDER- lO TRAVEL TEAM: Front row from left, Nina McDonald and Kerin Cole- 
man. Middle row: Sinead Hanley, Ciara Viscione, Alaina Villarreal and Colleen Stravin. Back 
row: Assistant Coach Keith Robinson, Joelle Robinson, Sarah McLoughne>, Mae\e Hernon, 
Samantha Caldwell, Jessica Caldwell and Head Coach (ierrv Hanlev. Missing from photo: 
Meghan Forde and Danielle Brown. 

QYS Under- 10 Team 
Finishes Season At 8-0 



The Quincy Youth Soc- 
cer's Under- 10 Girls A- 
Travel team finished their 
2009 spring season with a 
perfect 8-0 record. Quincy 
dominated on both sides of 
the field, scoring 4? goals 
and only allowing 13. 

Coached by Gerry Han- 
ley (head coach) and Keith 
Robinson (assistant coach), 
the team played in the South 
Shore League against teams 
from Stoughton, Fiaston. 
Weymouth. Brockton. Ray n- 
ham, Sharon. West Bridge- 
water and Bridgewaler. 

A highlight of the team's 
perfect season included a 
2-0 record in the Raynham 
Friendship Tournament 



where Quinc\ defeated both 
Brockton and Abington. 

"Myself and Coach Rob- 
inson should like to thank all 
the players, their attendance 
at practices and games was 
outstanding." said Coach 
Hanley. "The majonts of 
this group has been togeth- 
er for two years and their 
teamwork, skills and ca- 
maraderie was very evident 
in their displays. 1 have ni) 
doubt that if this group of 
girls remain together, the} 
will go on to bigger and bet- 
ter things. 

"Continuity, and consis- 
tency is key for these girls 
going forward. There is no 
secret; the more \ou play to- 



gether as a team, the better 
_\()u get " 

Coach Hanlev also of- 
tered thanks to the parents 
and the support the> showed 
throughout the spring season. 

"We would also like to 
thank the parents tor their 
unquahticd support and co- 
operation." 

learn members ol the H-0 
squad included Joelle Rob- 
inson. Sarah .VkLoughne>. 
.Maeve Hernon, Samantha 
Caldwell. Jessica Caldwell. 
Sinead Hanle>. C'lara Vis- 
cione. Alaina Villarreal. 
Colleen Stravm. .\ina .Mc- 
Donald. Kerin Coleman. 
.Meghan Forde and Danielle 
Brown. 



72"^ QBRW Starts July 23 



The 72'"' Quincy Bay 
Race Week (QBRW) will 
start in earnest on July 23 
with the "Inside Line" at the 
Quincy Yacht Club. 

This race features chil- 
dren from 8 to 16 from Bos- 
ton and South Shore towns 
of Quincy. Marshheld, Sci- 
tuate, Norwell. Hingham. 
Hull, Weymouth. Hanover. 
Braintree and Plymouth. 
Registration for the "Inside 
Line"-a race featuring Turn- 
abouts, Optis, 420s. Lasers 
and Widgens-is scheduled to 
begin at 1 1 :30 a.m.. with the 
race beginning at 1:30 p.m. 

Contact Kevin Madden 
at kjm45 (a aol.com for ad- 
ditional information on the 
"Inside Line." 

The "Outside Line," 
(Thunderbirds. Hustlers. 
210s and Rhodes 19). a race 
for sailors older than 1 8 starts 
July 25 and continues July 
26 off Quincy Yacht Club. 
The racecourse will be in be- 
tween Quincy's Long Island 
Bridge and Peddocks Island. 



Racing is scheduled to start 
at 1:45 p.m. each da>. 

Also on July 26, a ma- 
rine parade along the Quin- 
cy shoreline will begin at 
1:30 p.m from the Town 
River Yacht Club and end at 
Squantum Yacht Club. This 
year's marine parade theme 
is ".Movies," and the best 
viewing of the marine parade 
from onshore will be along 
Wollaston Beach 



Eight local yacht clubs 
make up the Quincv Ba\ 
Race Week .Association. 
They are Braintree VC. Met- 
ropolitan >C (Braintree). 
Quincv \C. South Shore \C 
(Wevmouth). Squantum YC, 
Town River \C. Wessii gus- 
set ""iC (N\mh \\e>mouth) 
and Woilaston ^ (' 

Visit QBRW "s website at 
w wvv.qbrwa.ori: and regis- 
tration forms. 



UL im umii ciMF 



14 



INSTRUCTION ^ ^ 

GAMES • BAHING CAGES "^ 

WEEK 3 

July 13 -17 

Ages 7-12 

Located at Eastern Nazarene 
College, Quincy 

Call Paul Beston for brochure 

61 7-472-1 962 



Paj-e 20 The Quincy Syui I hursdav, July 9, 2(M>*» 




SPOTLKqHT 

on 



HEALTH and FITNESS 



QMC Recognized For Excellence In End-Of-Life Care 

Quincy Medical Center 
was recently presented the 
2009 Excellence in End-of- 
Life Care Award by Beacon 
Hospice Inc. 

With this award. Beacon 
Hospice recognized QMC 
for its commitment and de- 
livery of the highest quality 
end-of-life care services to 
its patients. 

Quincy Medical Center 
was nominated and chosen 
to receive this award be- 
cause of its demonstrated 
ability and performance in: 
compassionate patient care; 
promoting access to the hos- 
pice benefit; effective con- 
tinuing education; and pro- 
fessional team work with a 
hospice provider. 

"The QMC team con- 
tinually strives to do what 
is best for the patients and 
families who come through 
their doors," says Beth Kel- 
ly, Beacon Hospice Director 






Accepting the Excellence in End-of-Life Care Award on behalf of Quincy Medical Center are 
(from left to right) Elizabeth Cadigan, RN, senior vice president of Patient Care Services; Leo 
Newhouse, MSW; and John Loughnane, MD, of the QMC Transitions in Life Care program. 
Betty Brennan, CEO of Beacon Hospice, (center) presented the award. 

Physician Hospital Rela- "They advocate for hos- 

pice for their patients when 
it is appropriate and educate 
about hospice when they 
know that it is on the hori- 



tions. "QMC takes pride in 
helping patients and fami- 
lies come to a clear under- 
standing of the disease/ill- 
ness/ailment they are facing 
and also the continuum of 
health care that is available 
to them. 



The Excellence in End- 
of-Life Care Awards is a 
Beacon Hospice awards 
program to honor a care giv- 
ing facility that has achieved 



zon. It is a pleasure to work excellence through its dedi- 

with a hospital that so fully cation and determination to 

embraces end-of-life care deliver superior end-of-life 

for their patients." care. 



Maintain Your Health While Traveling This Summer 



(ARA) - Summer has ar- 
rived, which means many 
people are looking forward 
to traveling on a relax- 
ing vacation. Whether that 
includes spending a long 
weekend at the beach, stay- 
ing close to home with fam- 
ily and friends or jetting off 
to a unique destination, it's 
important to remember not 
to take a vacation from your 
health. 

Traveling, indulging in 
your favorite foods or tak- 
ing some time off from your 
normal exercise routine may 
seem like typical vacation 
behavior, but all can have a 
direct effect on your health - 
especially when it comes to 
digestion. 



Although meant to be 
relaxing, vacation can pres- 
ent great temptations result- 
ing in health consequences. 
Summer getaways and trav- 
el plans could be miserable 
if you're feeling bloated, 
dealing with cramps or other 
gastrointestinal issues. 

"Summer is a very busy 
time for my patients as many 
of them are traveling on va- 
cation," says gastroenter- 
ologist Dr. Cynthia Yoshida. 
"Therefore, I remind all of 
them to take care of their di- 
gestive systems, so that they 
don't spend their vacation 
time dealing with uncom- 
fortable issues, such as con- 
stipation." 

No matter how you spend 



your summer vacation, there 
are simple things you can 
do to keep your health on 
track. If you plan to spend a 
lot of time in a car or on a 
plane, drink plenty of fluids 
to keep yourself hydrated. 
Enjoy your favorite foods 
and dining out, but remem- 
ber to incorporate some 
healthy items like fruits or 
vegetables into your meals. 
Also, be sure to stay active 
with simple activities such 
as swimming or relaxing 
walks on the beach. 

"However, if you do 
suffer from occasional 
constipation while travel- 
ing you can also try over- 
the-counter remedies, like 
MiraLAX(R)," Yoshida 



says. "MiraLAX naturally 
balances the water in your 
digestive system without 
the uncomfortable side ef- 
fects some other laxatives 
can cause, so you can re- 
sume a relaxing, enjoyable 
vacation." 

To help keep your diges- 
tion on track even when you 
travel MiraLAX laxative 
now cohies in single dose 
packets for a convenient, 
portable way to take relief 
with you anywhere. 

Summer is a wonderful 
time to relax, but it's im- 
portant to take the time to 
make smart choices for your 
health, and enjoy your sum- 
mer vacation. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 





for the 21st Century 

by Steven A Brustin, D.M.D. 

OBESITY INCREASES PERIODONTAL-DISEASE RISK 



In its mild form, gingivitis 
(gum disease) may only lead to 
bleeding gums. However, if not 
treated, gingivitis can progress 
to a more severe stage, perio- 
dontitis, in which bacteria-laded 
plaque provokes an inflam- 
matory response in gums. To 
avoid the potential of Infection 
and tooth loss, it is important to 
identify causes of gum disease, 
as well as to diagnose and treat 
it. With this in mind, researchers 
have recently found that obese 
adults are at higher risk of gin- 
givitis than people of normal 
weight. In fact, over the course 
of the 16-year study, otjesity 
was found to be associated 
with a 29 percent increase of 
periodontal disease. The com- 
nx)n denominator is thought to 
be inflammation. 

Poor oral hygiene habits 
such as not brushing and f toss- 
ing on a daily basis also make it 
easier for gingivitis to develop. 



A family history of dental dis- 
ease can also be a contribut- 
ing factor to the development 
of gingivitis. We utilize all 
available resources and pro- 
cedures to provide the dental 
health care our patients de- 
serve and expect. When was 
the last time you had a com- 
prehensive oral examination? 
We're located at 44 Greenleaf 
Street, where we're currently 
accepting new patients. Please 
call 617-47^220 to schedule 
an appointment. We're here 
to help. We offer the services 
of anesthesiology with a fully 
trained and qualified anesthe- 
siologist. Visit us on the web 
at www.quincydentist.com. 
PS. In addition to the obe- 
sity link witfi gum disease in 
the study mentioned atjove, 
a waist measurement of 40 
inches or more in men was 
linked to a higher risk of 
heart disease. 




VOICE 
FOR 

HEALTH 



by Dr. Gabrielle Freedman 

Chiropractor 




A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION 



If you run or walk regularly 
to keep fit, and experience 
chronic lower-back pain as 
a result, it may be that the 
mechanics of your stride lie at 
the root of your problem. People 
who overpronate have feet that 
roll inward more than the ideal 
15% with each step. As a result, 
the whole leg rotates inward. 
This action exerts a pull on the 
stabilizing muscles in the hip 
that attach to the lower part 
of the spine. The chiropractor 
can diagnose overpronation by 
having patients walk a few steps 
in their normal strides. If it is 
then indicated that overpronation 
is causing lower-back pain, 
steps can be taken to correct 
the problem and alleviate the 
imbalances it causes. 

Instead of treating the 
symptoms of a disease, we 



look for the cause of the 
condition, so as not to let the 
underlying problem foster and 
expand. We not only address 
low back pain, but a variety 
of other health conditions as 
well. At FAMILY PRACTICE 
OF CHIROPRACTIC, we are 
trained and licensed to treat the 
entire neuromusculoskeletal 
system and can help people lead 
healthier lives by focusing on 
wellness and prevention. For 
professional chiropractic care we 
invite you to call 617.472.4220 
to schedule an appointment. 
Seek chiropractic care and try 
to exercise daily. We're located 
at 112 McGrath Hwy., Quincy. 
No matter where you live in 
Eastern Mass.. we can offer you 
exceptional chiropractic service. 

PS. People with flat feet 
usually overpronate . 



www.freedmanchiro.ccmi 



QUINCY RESIDENT Rob Lescinskas (right) and cousin Dan 
Morris recently participated in the New Balance Heart Break 
Hill 5K to benefit Franciscan Hospital for Children at Boston 
College. Lescinskas is a nurse at Franciscan Hospital for Chil- 
dren. The cousins compete against each other every year in the 
event in memory of theri later fathers, Rob Sr. and Paul Mor- 
ris. More than 300 friends participated in the walk, and the 
event was an overall success. Photo By Natfian Fried-Lipski 



helpful for some. Cymbalta 
and Lyrica are two medicines 
that have won Food and Drug 
Administration approval for 
treatment of this condition. 

Exercise is important, but it 
must be started at a low level 
and gradually increased. Water 
exercises are well -tolerated. 
If a person can't keep up with 
the rest of the class, he or she 
shouldn't try to do so. Keep 
exercise at a level that's toler- 
able. 

The booklet on fibromy- 
algia deals with it in greater 
depth. To order a copy, write 
to: Dr. Donohue — No. 305, 
Box 536475, Orlando, PL 
32853-6475. Enclose a check 
or money order (no cash) for 
$4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with 
the recipient's printpd name 
and address. Please allow four 

weeks for delivery. 

*♦* 

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: 
I have what the doctors call 
black hairy tongue. Can you 
tell me about it? -Anon. 

ANSWER: Black hairy 
tongue, aside from its looks, 
is an innocent condition that 
comes from the elongation 
of tongue papillae, tiny pro- 
jections from the tongue's 
surface. Gently brushing the 
tongue three times a day with 
toothpaste, baking soda or 3 
percent hydrogen peroxide can 
usually get rid of it. If it's not 
gone in a month, return to the 
dentist or doctor for a follow- 



Fibromyalgia 
Frustrates Athlete 

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I 
have recently been diagnosed 
with fibromyalgia. Before 
I was diagnosed, I eixjoyed 
playing many sports and was 
a very physically active per- 
son. Since then, I have had to 
stop most of my activities. I 
wish I could be as active as I 
once was. Every time I try to 
play or exercise, my muscles 
ache unbearably. How can I 
get back to where 1 was? - 
R.C. 

ANSWER: (R.C. is a high- 
school-age young woman.) 

Fibromyalgia causes people 
to retreat from their usual ac- 
tivities and makes them yearn 
for the days before it struck. 

It's a peculiar disorder, 
with more unknown about it 
than known. Its cause hasn't 
been discovered. More women 
come down with it than men 
- another unexplained fact. 
No lab test detects it. X-rays, 
scans and ultrasound show no 
abnormality 

People afflicted with it 
complain of widespread body 
pain. They hurt all over, es- 
pecially muscles, bones and 
joints. Exercise aggravates 
the pain. Joints are stiff early 
in the morning. Fibromyalgia 
patients are tired all the time. 
They never get a decent night's 
sleep, and that adds to their fa- 
tigue. 

During an examination, 
doctors can detect tender poi nts , 
specific body sites where pres- 
sure of the examining finger 
elicits pain out of proportion 
to the pressure . There are 1 8 of 
these sites, nine on each side of 
the body. 

More than 70 medicines 
have been used in treating fi- 
bromyalgia. Tylenol and anti- 
inflammatory medicines such 
as Aleve, Advil and Motrin are 



up exam. 



*♦♦ 



DEAR DR. DONOHUE: 
We were told to drink six to 
eight glasses of water a day. 
A doctor on television said to 
drink water only when you 
are thirsty. Which is the right 
advice? - /?X. 

ANSWER: It's not neces- 
sary to drink six to eight glass- 
es of water a day. Most people 
can let thirst be their guide. In 
very hot weather, a couple of 
extra glasses of water keep a 

person hydrated. 

*** 

Dr. Donohue regrets that he is 
unable to answer individual let- 
ters, but he will incorporate them 
in his column whenever possible. 
Readers may write him or request 
an order form of available health 
newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 

f 2009 North Amenca Synd , Inc 
All Riehts Reserved 



Thursday, July 9, 2009 The Q^incy Stan Page 2 1 



Luau-Themed Dinner July 17 
To Benefit Music Ministry 



The music ministry of 
Sacred Heart Parish, 386 
Hancock St.. North Quincy, 
will sponsor a benefit luau- 
themed dinner Friday, July 
17 at 6 p.m. in the parish 
cafeteria. 

The dinner will feature 
appetizers, chicken and pork 
dishes, vegetables, rice and 
desserts. Cost is a minimum 



of $7.50 per person. 

Reservations are needed 
and can be made by calling 
the Sacred Heart rectory at 
617-328-8666 by Wednes- 
day, July 15. 

Proceeds benefit the mu- 
sic ministry's hosting of an 
ecumenical, tri-state church 
children's choir workshop 
and festival next spring. 



I^ELieiCN 

Quincy Point Congregational 
Worship, Summer Music Program 



Free Screening Of ^Oh, God!' 
July 17 At HN Church 



Vacation Bible School At 
Squantum Christian Fellowship 



Squantum Christian Fel- 
lowship announces it will 
hold Vacation Bible School 
July 27-3 1. 

The theme of this year's 
school is "Crocodile Dock." 
It will run from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon each day for children 
ages 4-11. 

The school will feature 
crafts, Bible songs, food and 
games. 

Kids will also experience 



a sense of purpose as they 
create fleecy Comfort Crit- 
ters for orphans in India. 
Kids will make one turtle to 
keep and one to give away. 

Parents are welcome to 
arrive before noon so they 
can enjoy the daily Firefly 
Finale with photos of their 
kids in action. 

For more information 
or to register, call 617-328- 
8771. 



Sunday worship July 12 
is at 10 a.m. at the Quin- 
cy Point Congregational 
Church, 444 Washington St. 

Rev. Ann Suzedell will 
preach and Chris Mendez 
will be deacon of the day. 

The organist this week 
will be Brandon Santini and 
the soloist will be Sarah 
Berggren. 

Coffee and refreshments 
will follow the service in the 
social hall. 

The church also an- 
nounces that the second an- 
nual "World of Music" sum- 
mer program will take place 
July 28-30. 

The program is hosted 
by the Quincy Point Con- 
gregational Church with 



instructors from the church 
and the Quincy Point Music 
Academy. 

This year's theme i:, 
American Song; the experi- 
ence is open to child enter- 
ing grades 1-6. 

Activities include songs 
from American Songbook. 
stories, instrument making, 
demonstrations, music ap- 
preciation and movement. 

The grand finale on July 
3v) will be a field trip to 
Symphony Hall. 

Cost is $30 per child and 
$15 for each additional sib- 
ling. 

Registration forms avail- 
able by calling the church 
office at 617-773-6424. 



Houjilis .Neck Congre 
gational Church, 310 Ma- 
net Ave , \mII present u tree 
screening of the film Oh. 
OVW.' Friday, Jul) 17 at 6:30 
p.m. in the church's Fellow- 
ship Hall 

All are welcome to at- 
tend. 

Written by Larry (ielbart 
(M*A*S*H), O// God' fea- 



tures beloved comedian 
Cjeorge Burns as God. who 
chooses an ordinary super- 
market clerk as the unlikely 
messenj^er to deliver His 
word to a skeptical human 
race. 

Admission is tree, a 
snack bar offering soups, 
sandwiches and drinks 
opens at 6 p m 



Union Congregational Church 



Lecture At Temple Beth El July 12 



Pastor John Swanson 
will preach on the second 
Six Steps of AA Sunday 
at I'nion Congregational 
Church, comer of Beach 
Street and Rawson Road 
in Wollaston at the 10 am 
worship service Sunday 

AA was founded in 1935 
by two alcoholics. Robert 
Smith and William Wilson 
Early on in the fellowship, 
12 Steps to Sobriety were 



developed bach step is in- 
cremental, building on the 
previous step, and each has 
a direct correlation to the 
Bible 

A A and the 1 2 Steps were 
heavilv influenced bv Dr 
Smiths wife, Anne Riley 
Smith. Episcopal clergyman 
Samuel .Moor Shoemaker 
and th. Christian Oxford 
Movement and basic Chris- 
tian tradition. 



Bureau Drawer Thrift 
Shop Sale July 13-17 



The Bureau Drawer 
Thrift Shop will hold a "Hot 
Summer Bag Sale" July 13- 
17 from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. 

The shop will be open 
Tuesday until 7 p.m. 

The thrift shop is located 



at Interfaith Social Services, 
105 Adams St.. Quincy. 
(two blocks from the Quin- 
cy Center T Station). 

For more information, 
call 617-773-6203 ext. 21. 



Joseph A. Greene, assis- 
tant director of the Semitic 
Museum of Harvard I'ni 
versity, will present a lec- 
ture entitled "Jacob Schiff 's 
Semitic Museum: I (X) Years 
Later" Sunday, July 12 at 
2 p.m. at Temple Beth El. 
1001 Hancock St.. Quincy. 

Admission to the lecture 



IS free of charge. 

The Semitic Museum is 
the University's museum of 
Near Eastern art and archae- 
ology. 

Greene completed his 
doctorate in Near Eastern 
archaeology at the Oriental 
Institute of the University of 
Chicago in 1985. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Houghs Neck Congre- 
gational Church will hold 
its regular worship service 
Sunda\ at 9;3() a.m 

All are welcome to attend 
the service. 

Pastor John Castricum 
will preach the sermon . " Ihe 
Fruits of the Spirit: Joy ."" 



Ihe scr\icc vmII also in- 
clude the presentation ot 
college scholarships b\ the 
church scholarship cominii- 
tee. 

June Paul and .Mark Paul 
will serve for the Diaconate. 
A fellowship coffee hour 
uill follow the service 



Assemblies of God 



158 V^hin^onVCQuincy 

phone. 773-9797 
Rev. Selwyn Bodley, Senior Pastor 

Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. 

Christian Ed: Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

Youth Group: Sunday 6 p.m. 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A«Contemporary Worship 
■ •Marriage & Family Group 
B •International Fellowship 




Evangelical 




Catholic 



St. Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 617-773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 11:30am, Weel<days 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 



ST. AGATHA CHURCH 
MH^TON-QUINCY 

4.^2 Adams Street 

Milton, MA 021 86 • 617-698-2439 

Schedule of Masses 

Saturday: 4:30pm 

Sunday: 7:30am. 9:00am (Family Mass), 

10:30am,* 12 noon, 5:00pm 

Weekday Masses: 7:00am and 9:00am 

" Interpreted ASl. Mass every 2nd Sunday at 

12 noon & assistive devices for the tiearing 

impaired available in Sacristy before Masses. 

Handicapped Accessible, handicapped 

parking, elevator to Upper/Lower Churches 

air-conditioned 



Catholic 



Sacred Heart Church 

"A Roman Catholic Community walking together 

in Faith. Worship, Education and Service" 

386 Hancock St., North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617)328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) and 5pm 

12 noon at Star of Sea Church 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and Sam, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



Catholic 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST 

44 School St., Quincy 

617-773-1021 

Weekend Mass Schedule 

Saturday, 4 p.m. 

Sunday, 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 

11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 

Weekday Masses 

Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. 

Handicapped Accessible 



St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 
SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday. 3:00-3:30 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditioned 



Congregational 



HOUGH'S NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue 

617-479-8778 

www.hncong.org 

Sunday Service 9:30am 

Pastor John Castricum 
"Fruits of the Spirit: Jof 




Saint Ann 's Church 

757 Hancock St., Wollaston 
617-479-5400 

Pastor; Rev. John J. Ronaghan 

Weekend Mass Schedule: 

Saturday 4:00 PM 

Sunday 7:00, 9:00, 11 :30AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairlift Available 



Methodist 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40BealeSt., Wollaston 



A 



Bethany 

CON(iRE(;Ari()NAL 

Church 

Spear & Coddington Streets 
Quincy Center. 617-479-73(K) 

WWW.QlINCYBKTHANYtlRRC H.ORC; 

Sunday Communion Worship 
Service & Church School at 10 am 

Rev. William C. Harding 
will preach 'Love Your Enemies' 

ALL ARE WELCOME! 
Child Care Available 

Fellowship Time in Allen Parlor 

Lij^ht Refreshments 
Church IS handicapped accessible 



Congregational 



WOLLASTON 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 
United Church of Christ 

48 WinthropAve. • 617-773-7432 

Sunday Summer 
Worship 9 AM 

Rev. Dr. Mary Louise Gifford, 

Senior Pastor 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd., Wollaston 

Rev. John Swanson. Pastor 

Sunday Worship Service 10 AM 

Church Office (6171 479-6661 



Congregational 



617-773-3319 

10:30 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Dr Susan Jarek-Glidden, Pastor 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington St. -61 7-773-6424 

Worship and Church School 10 am 

Rev. Ann Suzedell, Pastor 

visit us at www.QPCC.org 



Nazarene 



Squantum Christian Fellowship 

Got Questions^ Come pursue a.iswer=^ 

Sunday Worship 10 a.m. 

with Pastor Michael Fehan 

Children s Teaching !OAM 

5C HucKins Ave 
I Handicapped AccessiD'e 
B'ble Discussion Groups 

Call 61^-773-5678 o' nio^m^Sirlm':' org 



evangelical 
con(;regational chi rch 

6^ .\\.-whur> Ave . .\. Quint) M.A (Cri 

Phone isr .sa-^iw 

Re\ Francis Balla. Pastor 

Contempftrar^ Worship: Sunda\ JO >n am 

Web site: http: ww w.eccquinc>.c(>m 



Christian Science 




Wollaston Church i 
of the Nazarene A 

37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston ^^^ 

(617)472-5669 

On The Campus Of 

Eastern Nazarene College 

Pastor Rev. Fred. Fullerton 

Sundgy Se_rviQes 

8:30 am - Holy Communion 

9:45 am - Adult & Children s 

Sunday School 

11 a.m. - Blended Worship Service 

Come Worship with Us' 



Salvationist 



THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St.. Quincy • 617-472-2345 

9 45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

BRASS BAND MUSIC 

6PM TEEN SALVATION MEETING 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 



Eirst Church of 
Christ. Scientist 



10:30 \M Sunday Service 
& Sunday School 

Wednesday Evening Meeting 

20 Cireenleaf Street. Quinc> 
otT Hancock Street 

617-472-0055 



Jewish 



Temple Beth EI 

lOOl Hancock Street 

Qiiincs, MA 02169 

617-479-4309 

Shabhat scrvKCs — ^;15 

Sunda\ - ^:0() 

An etzalitarian concrei^atii^n 




To Advertise in this Directory f 
Call 617-471-3100 



r 



Page 22 Tlie Quincy Siui Thursday, July 9, 2(>09 



E. Louise 

Retired U.S. Postal 

A funeral Mass tor E. 
Louise Lou (Flaherty) Ja- 
cobson, ot Quincy. was cel- 
ebrated July 3 in St. Ann's 
Church, Wollaston. 

Mrs. Jacobson died June 
30 at the Weymouth Health- 
care Center. 

Bom in Boston, she lived 
in Dorchester prior to mov- 
ing to Wollaston 24 years 
ago. She was a retired em- 
ployee of the US Post Office 
at So. Postal Annex, Bos- 
ton and was a longtime pa- 
rishioner and lifelong sup- 
porter of St. Peter's Church 
in Dorchester, as well as a 
longtime parishioner at St. 
Ann's Church in Wollaston. 

Mrs. Jacobson was also a 
volunteer for the Jerry Lewis 
Annual MDA Telethon and 
the Channel 2 (PBS) annual 
fundraising auction. 

Wife of the late Charies J. 



Jacobson 

Service Employee 

Jacobson; mother of Eileen 
M. Furber of Dorchester, 
Ann L. Sweeney of Milton, 
Carol Griftin of Dorchester, 
Charies J . Jacobson of North 
Reading, Peter F. Jacobson 
of Quincy and Ruthie Jacob- 
son of Hull; sister of the late 
Katherine Renehan, Eileen 
Geary, and Thomas, Donald 
and Francis Flaherty. 

She is also survived by 
1 1 grandchildren and five 
great-grandchildren. 

A private interment was 
in the MA National Cem- 
etery, Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Alfred 
D. Thomas Funeral Home. 
Milton. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in her name to the 
Muscular Dystrophy Asso- 
ciation. 10 Commerce Way 
#4,Raynham,MA02727. 



Obituaries 

Carolyn A. Schmock, 74 

Owned Regina Russell Tea Room 



A funeral Mass for Caro- 
lyn A. (Loeffler) Schmock, 
74, of Quincy, was celebrat- 
ed Monday in St. John the 
Baptist Church. Quincy. 

Mrs. Schmock died June 
30 at Quincy Medical Cen- 
ter. 

Born in Quincy, she 
was raised and educated 
in Braintree and Hingham 
schools and was a graduate 
of Hingham High School. 
She had lived in Quincy for 
55 years. 

She was the well-known 
owner and operator of Re- 
gina Russell's Tea Room in 
Quincy for 36 years. She 
was an avid reader and was 
the author of several books 




CAROLYN A. SCHMOCK 

of Dariene M. Anderson and 
Daniel J. Schmock, both of 
Quincy, Gary R. Schmock 
of Hull, and the late Robert 
G. Schmock, John Schmock 
and Gail Schmock; grand- 
mother of James M. Ander- 



including "Card Reading son of Quincy and Darisa 



Evelyn Stapleton, 81 

Bookkeeper 



Handbook," "Astrology 
Made Easy" and some chil- 
dren's books. 

Mrs. Schmock was a 
devoted and loving wife, 
mother and grandmother. 

Wife of 55 years to John 
E. "Jack" Schmock; mother 



A funeral Mass for Ev- 
elyn M. (Finnerty) Staple- 
ton, 81 , of Quincy. was cel- 
ebrated July 2 in St. Francis 
Xavier Church. South Wey- 
mouth. 

Mrs. Stapleton died June 
29 at the Quincy Rehabilita- 
tion and Nursing Center. 

She grew up in West 
Roxbury and was a retired 
bookkeeper for the Amal- 
gamated Meat Cutters 
Union Local #592. She also 
loved to bowl. 

Wife of the late James 
E. Stapleton. Jr.; mother of 
James E. Stapleton 111 and 
his wife Chariene of Plym- 



outh and Jennifer L. Baccari 
and her husband Gregory of 
NC; sister of Mary Virgili 
of NY and the late Thomas 
Finnerty. John Finnerty and 
Barbara Harrington; grand- 
mother of Vincent Baccari 
and Krysta Augustinos. 

She is also survived by 
two great-grandchildren and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Lakev- 
iew Cemetery. South Wey- 
mouth. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the McDon- 
ald Funeral Home. South 
Weymouth. 



M. St. Germain of Foxboro. 

She is also survived by 
several other grandchildren 
and great-grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funer- 
als, Quincy. 



Helen R. Noonan, 82 

Secretary in Quincy Public Schools 

A private funeral service Robert Wheeler. Jr. and his 

for Helen R. (Frazier) Noo- wife Lisa. Kimberiy Mills 

nan. 82, of Quincy was held and her husband Wayne, Al- 

recently. lison Smith and her husband 

Mrs. Noonan died June Jimmy, Meredith Noonan, 

26. Liam Noonan, Kelly Rivard 

Born in Buriington, New and her husband Joe, Robert 

Jersey, she was raised and Noonan and Megan Noonan; 

educated in Quincy where great-grandmother of Tay- 




fm^ * 



4 Thought 
For Th£ ^eetc 



JSK0^~ M^^ Thinking and thanking are two words 
^^tffj^';^^^^^ that belong together. . . Think about this! 
^^^^^^J^^^^H If you think enough about what you have, 
^^^HV^^^^^H instead of complaining about what 

don't have; if you think enough about the 
SCOTT DEWARE good that has happened to you, instead of 
feeling sorry for yourself about all the 'bad luck' you have had, 
you will thank God for His goodness and mercy. 

Couldn't it be said that it's not so much what happens to us, 
but how we react and respond? The trouble is that most of us don't 
do enough positive thinking ... We moan and grown about the 
bad things, and take the good things for granted. . . We complain 
that the cup is half empty, instead of thanking God that it is half 
fnU. . . 

Years ago there was a popular ballad entitled : "Aren't You Glad 
Yra're You?" It went something like this: "Every time you're near 
a rose, aren't you glad you've got a nose. . . When the meadow 
lark appears, aren't you glad you've got two years. . . And when 
the dawn is fresh with dew, aren't you glad you're you?" 

We think this is a pretty good philosophy . . . What do you 
think? 

Deware Funeral Home 

Service Beyond Expectations 



Dignity^ 



Wollaston Chapel 
576 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02 170 

(617) 472-1137 

Affordability Plus Service 

Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 

A Service Family Affiliate ofAFFS and Service Corp. Int. 

206 Winter Street • Fall River. MA 02720 » (508) 676-2454 



she had lived all her life. 
She was a 1947 graduate 
of Fisher Junior College 
and worked for 20 years as 
a secretary for the Quincy 
Public School system. 

Wife of the late Patrick 
J. Noonan. Jr.; mother of 
Patrick J. Noonan 111 and 
his wife Corinne Maioli of 
North Easton. Patricia Napi- 
er and her husband Edward 
of SC. Kathleen Noonan of 
Quincy and the late Robert 
Noonan; grandmother of 



lor and Haley Wheeler and 
Patrick and Taylor Smith; 
sister of JoAnne Burke of 
Hanover. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in her name to the 
Norwell VNA. 91 Long- 
water Circle. Norwell. MA 
02061 or to the United Ce- 
rebral Palsy, 71 Arsenal St., 
Watertown, MA 02472. 



Grover E. Clark, 91 

US Army Veteran 



Grover E. "Sawhorse" 
Clark, 91, of Shalimar, 
Florida, formerly of Quincy, 
died June 28. 

He was a United States 



Army veteran of World War 
II, serving in the South Pa- 
cific. 

He is survived by his 
wife, son, sister and niece. 



Michael J. Burke-Lally 

Navigator In U.S. Navy 



A funeral Mass for Mi- 
chael J. "Mikey" Burke-Lal- 
ly. of Hull and Quincy, will 
be celebrated today (Thurs- 
day) at 10: 15 a.m. in Sacred 
Heart Church, Weymouth 
Landing. 

Mr. Burke-Lally died 
July 4. 

Born in Boston, he was a 
resident of Quincy and Hull 
and was a 2(X)7 graduate of 
Braintree High School. He 
was currently an active ser- 
vice member in the United 
States Navy working as a 
navigator on the bridge of 
the USS Kidd. Prior to join- 
ing the Navy he worked for 
his aunt's restaurant, Kris- 
tin's Breakfast in Braintree. 

He was also a member of 
the L Street Running Club, 
was an avid boater who re- 
ceived his boater's license 
before his driver's license. 
He also enjoyed snowboard- 




MICHAELJ. 
BURKE-LALLY 

Lally of Braintree, Ann 
Marie and Michael Hurley 
of Hull and James Burke 
and Elaine Hartnett of Mil- 
ton; stepbrother of Alicia 
and Christopher Carney of 
Hull; cousin and best friend 
of Colin McCarthy of Wey- 
mouth. 

He is also survived by 
many aunts, uncles, cousins 
and friends. 

Visiting hours were held 



ing, cars, dnving. golfing Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. 
and spendmg time with his ,„ Keohane Funeral Home, 



Quincy. 

Interment will be in Hull 
Village Cemetery, Hull. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Wounded 
Warrior Project, 7020 AC 
Skinner Parkway, Suite 100, 
Jacksonville. FL 32256. 



family. 

Son of Lt. Michael S. 
Lally of the Suffolk Coun- 
ty Sheriff's Department of 
Quincy and Margaret-Mary 
(Burke) Carney and her hus- 
band Brian of Hull; grand- 
son of Joseph and Elaine 

Theresa H. Wallace, 83 

Medical Secretary 

A funeral Mass for The- 
resa H. (Corrigan) Wallace. 
83, of Quincy. will be cel- 
ebrated today (Thursday) 
at 10 a.m. in Sacred Heart 
Church, North Quincy. 

Mrs. Wallace died July 6 
at the Boston Medical Cen- 
ter. 

Born in Allentown. PA. 
she graduated from North 
Quincy High School in 1944 
and had lived in Quincy for 
most of her life. She worked 
as a medical secretary at 
the Carney Hospital in 
Dorchester for 20 years and 
also worked in the Medical 
Records Department and 
had been retired for many 
years. 

She also was a former 
foster mother for Catholic 
Charities and was a Girl 
Scout leader and Cub Scout 
den mother. 

Wife of Spike Wallace, 




I 



Funerals • Cremations • Prearrangements 




DENNIS SWEENEY FUNERAL HOME 

Quincy *s First for Three Generations 

Dennis S. Sweeney 

Funeral Director 

74 Elm Street, Quincy Massachusetts 02169 • dXl-llli-lll^ 
www.dennissweeneyfuneralhome.com 



THERESA H. WALLACE 

Quincy Police Department 
(Ret.); mother of Ann Ma- 
rie Walport of OR. Theresa 
Kerrigan, Georgeann "Gigi" 
Wallace, Stephanie Blaikie, 
all of Quincy. Mary Jo Col- 
lins of Plymouth, George 
Wallace. Jr., of MS and the 
late Maureen Bell; sister of 
Thomas Corrigan of PA, 
Mildred O'Hare of West- 
wood and the late Anita Lear 
and Alice Ermeling. 

She is also survived by 
17 grandchildren and ten 
great-grandchildren and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Visiting hours were held 
Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. in 
the Sweeney Brothers Home 
for Funerals, Quincy. 

Interment will be in Pine 
Hill Cemetery, West Quin- 
cy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Lupus Foun- 
dation of America, Inc., P.O. 
Box 63 1 047 , Baltimore , MD 
21263-1047 or to Quincy 
Animal Control, 56 Broad 
St., Quincy, MA 02169. 



Thursda>, July 9, 20(>9 The Q\xincy Sim Page 2^ 




Stephen K. Richmond 

Business Owner 

A funeral Mass for Ste- 
phen K. Richmond, of Qui n- 
cy, formerly of Somerville, 
will be celebrated today 
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. in St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston. 

Mr. Richmond died July 
3. 

Born in Boston, he had 
lived in Somerville until 
moving to Quincy over 40 
years ago. He was a true en- 
trepreneur. He was the own- 
er and operator of Century 
21 Network. Richmond As- 
sociates as well as the for- 
mer owner of Happy Chef, 
Pizza Chef restaurants. 

He also loved cooking, 
being around friends and 
family, celebrating the 4"' 
of July and cheering on the 
various New England sports 
teams. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Colum- 
bus, organizing fundraisers 
for local schools and sports 
teams and sponsoring the 
Babe Ruth World Series. 

Husband of Janice (De- 
Rosa) Richmond of Quincy; 
father of Stephen Richmond 
and his wife Marlea of 
Marshfield, Michelle Pud- 



STEPHEN K. RICHMOND 

sey of Foxboro, Jennifer 
Terry and her husband Greg 
of Braintree and Christie 
Lespasio and her husband 
Peter of Norfolk; uncle of 
Kathleen Munson of Quin- 
cy; brother in-law of Grace 
Richmond of Medford. 

He is also survived by 
eight grandchildren. 

Visiting hours were held 
Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. 
and 7-9 p.m. in the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

Interment will be in Blue 
Hill Cemetery, Braintree. 

Memorial donations may 
be made in his name to the 
Friends of the Unborn, PO 
Box 692246, Quincy, MA 
02169. 



Mary H. Kirby 

Office Administrator 

A funeral Mass for Mary ticient. She worked as an 

office administrator for both 
Blue Cross Blue Shield and 
Bank of Boston, retiring in 
1990. 

Wife of William Kirby 
of Hingham and the late Ed- 
ward Martin; former wife 
of the late Albert Ashman- 
skas, Sr.; mother of Albert 
Ashmanskas, Jr. of Quincy, 
Joan Troup and her husband 
Emile of Canton, Thomas 
Ashmanskas and his wife 
Maria of Quincy, Judith 
Koelsch and her husband 



H. (Zilinskas) Kirby, of 
Hingham, formerly of Quin- 
cy and South Boston, was 
celebrated Wednesday in 
Church of the Resurrection, 
Hingham. 

Mrs. Kirby died July 4. 

She grew up in South 
Boston in a Lithuanian 
household and was raised 
to speak fluent Lithuanian. 
During World War II, all 
five of her brothers served 
in the military concurrently, 
a fact that he family was 



particularly proud. She was Robert of Hingham, David 



a member of the St. Peter's 
Lithuanian Society and 
volunteered for the Sisters 
of Jesus Crucified in South 
Boston. 

In later years, she became 
a member of the Women's 



Ashmanskas and his wife 
Pamela of Quincy and Peter 
Ashe and his wife Theresa 
of Hanson; grandmother of 
William, Darrell, Carlos, 
and Rima Ashmanskas, Car- 
olyn and Matthew Koelsch 



League at President's Golf and Jeremy and Eric Ashe; 
Course and completed her sister of Cecelia Sullivan of 



degree at Quincy Junior 
College and later taught 
herself to be computer pro- 

SHINE Counsel 
At Aging Office 

A SHINE counselor will 
be available Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays from 9:30 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m. at the Quincy 
Council on Aging office, 
83 Saratoga St., Quincy, to 
assist the elderly and adults 
with disabilities with health 
information and benefits. 

SHINE is an acronym 
for Serving the Health 
Information Needs of 
Elders. 

Call 617-376-1247 to 
make an appointment or 
to speak with a SHINE 
counselor. 

Home visits can be 
arranged for shut-ins. 



West Roxbury. 

She is also survived by 
several nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Blue 
Hill Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Pyne Ke- 
ohane Funeral Home, Hing- 
ham. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Lithuanian 
Children's Relief Fund, 261 
Thatcher St., Brockton, MA 
02302. 



Michael E. Kubera 

Public Safety Officer 



A funeral Mass for Mi 
chael H. Kubera, of Miltim, 
formerly of Quincy, was 
celebrated Wednesday m St. 
Agatha's Church, Milton. 

Mr Kubera died July 3. 

Born in Boston, he grew 
up m Qumcy before moving 
to Milton several years ago. 
He was a graduate of North 
Quincy High School and at- 
tended Massasoit Commu- 
nity College where he ma- 
jored in Criminal Justice. He 
had worked for many years 
at Boston Medical Center in 
the Protection Department 
as a public safety officer. 

In his younger years, he 
was an all-star Babe Ruth 
baseball player and also 
played football and baseball 
in high school. He enjoyed 
spending his time coaching 
baseball, ba^ketball and soc- 
cer for his son. Cameron's. 
Milton Youth teams. 

Husband of Kerry E 
(Glynn) Kubera of Milton; 
father of Cameron, Kristen 
and Tommy Kubera, all of 
Milton; son of Rosemary 




MICHAKLE. KUBERA 

(Nort(m) Kubera of Quincy 
and the late Hdw ard Kubera; 
brother of Cheryl Bailev 
and her husband Robert and 
their children Mackensie 
and Kasie, all of Abing 
Um and Mark Kubera and 
his daughter Madison ot 
Quincy; step-son of Karen 
(DeBellis) Kubera of Ran- 
dolph. 

He is also survived by an 
extended family and man) 
friends. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home. Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Make A Wish 
Foundation of Massachu- 
setts. One Bulfinch Place, 2'"' 
Floor. Boston. MA 021 14. 



Mary Teresa 

Secretary, N 

A funeral Mass tor Mary 
Icresa (Diloia) Willard. X2. 
ot Haverhill, formerlv of 
Quinc) and l.vcrett. was 
celebrated lucsda> in St 
John the Baptist Church. 
Quinc) 

Mrs Willard died Julv 
1 at the .Merrimack Vallev 
Hospital. Haverhill 

Born in Boston, she was 
raised and educated in rhcl 
sea schools, and had lived 
in Haverhill the past \ear. 
previously in Everett for 15 
years and Quincv tor many 
years She had also lived in 
.Mattapan and l>)rchester 

She was a former secre 
tarv for the John Hancock 
Life Insurance fOnipanv 
and for the tormer Harth- 
stone Insurance Company 
in Brookime She had also 
worked as a nurse "s aide and 
had been retired tor many 
years 

Wife of the late Freder 



Willard, 82 

urse's Aide 




MARY I ERKSA WILLARD 

ick L Willard, sister ot the 
late Dominic Diloia. I:milia 
Conway. Anna DeMareo 
and Leonard Diloia 

She IS also survived by 
many nieces. nephews, 
grandnieces and grandneph 
ews. 

Interment was in Blue 
Hill Cemetery. Braintree 

hunera! arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home tor funer- 
al s, Qumcy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the chanty ot 
vour choice. 



John J. Welch 

Machinist. CS Army Veteran 



Rita M. Dolan, 87 



A funeral Mass for Rita 
M. (Braun) Dolan, 87, of 
Halifax, formerly of Whit- 
man. Randolph. Dunstable 
and Quincy. will be cel- 
ebrated today (Thursday) 
at 10:15 a.m. in Holy Ghost 
Church, Whitman. 

Mrs. Dolan died July 5. 

Born and raised in Quin- 
cy, she was a graduate of the 
Woodward School for Girls 
and Quincy High School in 
1940. She was a member of 
the first Senior Giri Scouts 
program in Quincy and re- 
mained a lifelong member 
of the Giri Scouts of Amer- 
ica Association. She was 
also an active participant in 
the many social programs at 
the Senior Centers of both 
Whitman and Halifax. 

She was past president 
of the William R. Caddy 
Marine Corps League Aux- 
iliary. Her hobbies included 
knitting, crocheting, and 
various arts and crafts. 

Wife of the late Vincent 
F. Dolan; mother of Donna 
Dibbern and her husband 
Gerald of Halifax, Dorothy 
Faust and her husband Gor- 
don of Spencer, Diane Sop- 
er of Hanson and Michael 
Dolan of NH; daughter of 
the late Frederick and Caro- 
line (Schell) Braun. 

She is also survived by 
six grandchildren, seven 
great-grandchildren, many 
nieces, nephews, sister in- 



laws and cousins. 

Visiting hours were 
held Wednesday from 2-4 
p.m. and 6-8 p m. from the 
Blanchard Funeral Chapel. 
Whitman. 

Interment will be in St. 
Michael's Cemetery. Avon 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Bay Pointe Resi- 
dential Counsel Fund. 50 
Chnstys Place. Brockton. 
MA 02301 or to Vista Care 
Hospice. 690 Canton St.. 
Westwood, MA O209O or 
to Senior Day Program of 
Hanson, c/o Senior Center. 
132 Maquan St., Hanson. 
MA 02341. 



A funeral Mass tor John 
J Welch . of Quincy. former- 
ly of South Boston, was eel 
ebrated Tuesday in St Anns 
Church. Wollaston 

Mr. Welch died July 2. 

Born and raised in South 
Boston, he later moved to 
Quincy He was a World 
War 11 I'nited States .'Xrmy 
veteran and worked tor more 
than 30 years as a machinist 
at Watertovv n Arnsenal 

Husband of the late Mar- 
garet McCarthy Welch and 
former husband of .Margue- 
rite Welch Connaughton of 
Squantum; father of limo- 
thy F. Welch and his wife 
Mary of Squantum; grand- 



father ot .Margaret Welch 
.\1cDonou<:h of Squantum 
and the late Christine Welch 
Gillis. great-grandfather 
ot Iimothy McDonough 
ot Squantum; steptather ot 
Mamaret .Adams ot Fal 
mouth, step-grandtather ot 
Iracy .Adams Brov\n of FL 

Interment was m Pine 
Hill Cemetery. Quincy 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home. Quincy 

Memorial donations 

may be made in his name to 
the Christine Welch -Gill is 
Scholarship Fund, c o Notre 
Dame Academy. 1073 .Main 
St .Hingham.. MA 02043 





Honor Your 
Loved One's 

Memory 
With Flowers 

cliffords.com 

1.800.441.8884 



Grandma loved 

classic poetry^ 
travelings 

and Grandpa. 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Serrice, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
Whether it's reading classic poetry or 

compiling a memory 
board of her favonte 
travel photos, you can 
count on us to help 
you plan a service that 
will be just as imique as the person you love. 




^9^ 785 Hancock street • 



uneraf iServuo 

Quincy • 617-773-3551 



Member by Imnlation 0HSH/ N*if"5"J' Selected Morfjrwns 



Page 24 Tlie Quincy Sun Thursday, July 9, 2009 






KING Crossword 



ACROSS 


55 


Dinner for 


17 Western st. 


1 Do sums 




Dobbin 


19 Crony 


4 Apprehend 


56 


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22 Birds, to 


8 Film segment 


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Brutus 


12 Anger 




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23 Violin's 


13 Medley 




character 


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14 Similar to 


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26 Paddock 


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16 Chair 


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27 Winged 


protector 




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28 Taverns 


18 Filch 


61 


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29 Pound of 


20 Corrode 






poetry 


21 Open 


DOWN 


30 Wedding 


somewhat 


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cake feature 


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31 Bellow 


28 One with lots 




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35 Telecast 


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38 Maiden 


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40 Possess 


32 Satan's 




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42 Possesses 


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45 Fishing gear 


33 Submachine 


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34 Jazz style 


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49 French city 


37 Raised 




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50 Space 


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41 Comic 




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52 Praise in 


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54 Historic time 


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' 2009 King Features Syiid., Inc. 



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HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will give you a 
message every day. It's a numerical puzzle designed to spell 
out your fortune. Count the letters in your first name. If the 
rujmber of letters is 6 or more, subtract 4. If the numt>er is less 
than 6, add 3. The result is your key number Start at the up- 
per left-hand comer and check one of your key numbers, left 
to right. Then read the message the letters under the 
checked figures give you. 

e 2009 King Features Syndicate. Inc World rights reserved 



HOCUS -FOCUS 



BY 
HENRY B0LT»NOFF 




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Trivid 

test byfifi I 

-Rodriguez 



1 . CITY NICKNAMES. 
What U.S. city is known by 
the nickname "Bison City"? 

2 ANIMAL KINGDOM: 
What kind of creature 



IS a 



goa. 



3. SPORTS: Which sport 
might include a maneuver 
called a "closed choctaw"? 

4 GENERAL KNOWL- 
EDGE: What color is ama- 
ranth? 

5. LANGUAGE: What is the 
U.S. equivalent of the British 
pram? 

6. COMMUNICATION: 
What is the standard word 
that represents the letter "P" 
in the international radio al- 
phabet? 

7. MOVIES: What was the 
name of the cat in the movie 



MAGIC MAZE 



"Men in Black"? 

8 . TELEVISION: Who played 
the role of Gus McCrae in the 
"Lonesome Dove" television 
series? 

9. THE BODY: What is a hu- 
man's normal temperature in 
Centigrade? 

10. PSYCHOLOGY: Some- 
one suffering from nyctopho- 
bia would be afraid of what? 
Answers 
l.Buftalo,N.Y. 

2. Tibetan gazelle 

3. Figure skating 

4. Red 

5. Baby carriage 

6. Papa 

7. Orion 

8. Robert Duvall 
9.37C 

10. Night or darkness 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 

^ —BRIDGE: 
^ UNITED STATES 



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A B Y (g OLDENGATE) y W 

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YYXAVUTCRQKPBLR 

ONETNOMERFAMOLE 

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Fold the listed words in die diagram. Tliey run m all directions - 
forward, backwaixl. up, down and diasonally. 

Brooklyn Green Rainbow Sunshine 

Eads London Royal Gorge Tobin 

Fremont McKinley Seven Mile Vicksburg 

Golden Gate Oakland Bay Stone Arch 

£ 2009 King Features Syndicate Inc World rights reserved 



I 

SaloiTK^'s 

Slars 



ARIES (March 21 to April 

19) Don't be .surprised if, in 
spite of your well-made plans, 
something goes awry. But don't 
worry. Your knowledge of the 
facts plus your Arian charm will 
help you work it out. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 

20) A personal relationship 
seems to be demanding more 
than you feel you're able to give. 
Best advice: Confront the issue. 
You could find the situation sur- 
prisingly easy to work through. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 
20) Resist being pressured into 
meeting your self-imposed dead- 
line. This is important if you re- 
ally feel that taking more time to 
finish a project could save time 
in the long run. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) A vacation choice seems 
less interesting than when you 
first made it. Could it be a matter 
of the place or the people going 
with you? Find out before you 
consider a change of plans. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
Someone might be overriding 
your Leonine logic to get you 
to agree to "favors" you would 
normally avoid. Take a new look 
at what you've been asked to do 
and see if you've been misled. 

VIRGO (August 23 to Sep- 
tember 22) Try to keep that 
emerging "judgmental" aspect in 
check this week. Too many cri- 
tiques on relatively unimpt)rtant 
issues could create a lot of nega- 
tive bounce-back reactions. 

LIBRA (September 23 to Oc- 
tober 22) Facing unpleasant facts 
about an associate isn't easy. But 
ignoring them isn't wise. Ask a 



trusted (and neutral) friend to 
help guide you on what to do and 
how you might doit. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21 ) A shift in opinion 
regarding a wcirkplace situation 
could go a long way in vindicat- 
ing the stand you've taken. But 
be awiire that a satisfactory reso- 
lution could still be a long way 
off. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 
22 to December 21) It's not like 
you to chtxise the easy way rath- 
er than the right way to do things. 
So, follow your instincts and feel 
asstired they will lead you to the 
right decision. Good luck. 

CAPRICORN (December 22 
to January 19) Hold off on mak- 
ing a personal commitment until 
you find out what it really entails 
and whose interests are actually 
involved. There could be hidden 
facts you need to know. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February i 8) A new friend offers 
an unexpected (opportunity that 
could lead to a career change. 
Check it out carefully and con- 
sider getting an assessment from 
someone familiar with this field. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) A surprising discov- 
ery leads tp mixed reactions 
from those involved in the "rev- 
elation." But as you com.e to ap- 
preciate the truth, you'll be able 
to also come to terms with your 
feelings. 

BORN THIS WEEK: Your 
love of travel helps you appreci- 
ate the wonders of the world. You 
would find a satisfying career in 
any travel-related industry. 

© 2009 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



CryptoQuip 

This is a simple substitution cipher in which each letter used stands 

for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout 

the puzzle. Solution is acconnplished by thai and error. 

Clue: X equals Q 
MNZDB GAAEZPT OLRRBH 

, U TZHD, XLZSB ZHEBW 

US U VBDDAM, RDUPSBW 

U XLZGNB AP NZO VUGB. 

© 2009 King Features Synd,, Inc. 



King Crossword 

AHSWERS 

Solution time: 25 mins. 



Magic Maze 

AHS\NERS: 

—BRIDGE : 

UNITED STATES 



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Thursday, July 9, 2009 TT&e Qvdncy Sun Page 25 



* * * On The Campaign Trail - City Election 2009 * * * 



With the campaign season underway for this fall's city election, The Quincy Sun 
will publish, from time to time and when space is available, press releases submit- 
ted from candidates and their committees. 

The Sun wants its readers to know the releases are not written by Quincy Sun 
staff. The Sun retains the right to edit releases for space purposes. 

Phelan Campaign 
Announces Campaign Manager 



Koch To Open Re-Election Headquarters 



The Bill Phelan cam- 
paign announces it has hired 
Michael Ward as campaign 
manager. Ward began work- 
ing on July I and will run 
day-to-day campaign opera- 
tions. 

"It's an enormous plus to 
have a professional with the 
extensive campaign back- 
ground and experience that 
Mike brings to our team," 
Phelan said. 

"We are fortunate to have 
so many hundreds of talent- 
ed and hard-working people 
involved as volunteers, with 
new jjeople joining us every 
day," Phelan. "As our team 
grows, Mike will put his or- 
ganizational skills to work 
ensuring that our campaign 
is effective, efficient and 




MICHAEL WARD 

victorious in November." 

"I am excited to be 
board," Ward said. "The 
Phelan Campaign has an in- 
credible sense of energy and 
enthusiasm and commit- 
ment among all the volun- 
teers and supporters whom 
I've been meeting. We're 
going to take that energy, 
and we're going to channel 



it into a campaign that is 
organized and disciplined, 
a principled campaign that 
focuses on the issues, and a 
campaign that's fun and ex- 
citing." 

According to the state- 
ment. Ward has worked on 
many campaigns in Massa- 
chusetts, Pennsylvania and 
New Mexico. Most recently, 
he managed a congressio- 
nal campaign in New Mex- 
ico. He also has experience 
working in municipal gov- 
ernment in Massachusetts. 

Bom in raised in Way- 
land, Ward has a B.A. from 
Amherst College and a mas- 
ters in public policy from 
the Kennedy School of Gov- 
ernment. 



Mayor Tom Koch will 
open his re-election head- 
quarters at 70 Billings Rd. 
in North Quincy with an 
open house at 6 p.m. next 
Tuesday, his campaign has 
announced. 

The ItKation, the former 
Accent Upholstery shop on 
Billings Road, will be the 
hub of Mayor Koch's cam- 
paign until Election Day, 



and he invited any resident 
to drop by for information, 
ask questions or to volunteer 
for the campaign 

"We are running the 
same kind of honest, grass- 
roots campaign we ran two 
years ago. and a big part of 
that IS getting everybody 
involved as much as pt)s- 
sible. Opening a headquar 
ters is a big piece of that." 



Koch said "I could not hap- 
pier that we found a space in 
Norfolk Downs, close to so 
many great businesses and 
so many thriving neighbor- 
hoixls, including my own '" 
For more information 
about the open house or the 
Koth campaign, residents 
can visit www.mayortom- 
koch com or call 617-773- 
KOCH(5623). 



Cahill Switches Party Affiliation 



Laforest Graduates White House Project, 
Establishes Mass. Leadership Circle 



Ward One City Council 
Candidate Margaret Lafor- 
est recently graduated from 
The White House Project's 
Go Run leadership training 
program, which has trained 
over 6,000 women to lead 
a political life across the 
country. 

"1 am so grateful to re- 
ceive a scholarship to attend 
TWHP's training, that I've 
committed to founding the 
"Leadership Circle" in MA 
for 2010," Laforest said in a 
statement. 

The Leadership Circle is 
the donor program working 
to raise money on behalf of 
TWHP 

"While the campaign 
is keeping me very busy 
in 2009, I'm so proud to 
announce that The White 
House Project is planning a 
training session in MA for 
March of 2010 and I hope 
to recruit some women to 
attend and raise money to 
support their training," La- 
forest said, adding she has 
requested the WHP consider 
Quincy as a location for a 
fiiture training session. 

The White House Proj- 



ect, founded by Take our 
Daughters to Work Day 
co-founder and renowned 
women's advocate Marie C. 
Wilson, is a national non- 
partisan non-profit organiza- 
tion that works to advance a 
richly diverse, critical mass 
of women into all leadership 
sectors, up to and including 
the United States Presiden- 
cy. 

A common theme men- 
tioned at The White House 
Project is that often women 
don't consider living a polit- 
ical life until asked. Part of 
the homework to prepare for 
the training program, was to 
write about events and expe- 
riences that have influenced 
community involvement and 
political pursuit and what 
you've done as a result. 

"For one of mine," La- 
forest said, "I noted that my 
mother had served on the 
Houghs Neck Community 
Council and as a child I vol- 
unteered at many events and 
helped collate "The Bulle- 
tin." 

Laforest also said she 
actively volunteered as an 
adult at the HNCC. 



"Since then, 1 have served 
as corresponding secretary, 
vice president and president 
of the HNCC. I have chaired 
various events, including the 
popular Chowdafest, Mayor 
of Houghs Neck Contest, 
collate The Bulletin and of 
course brought my children 
with me to help. 

For more information, 
call Campaign Manager, 
Jim McCarthy at 617-285- 
8405. 



Cont 'd From Page I 
Deval Patrick in next year's 
gubernatonal campaign. 
Changing from Demwrat to 
unenrolled would mean Ca- 
hill would avoid a primary 
election and be on the ballot 
for the final election in No- 
vember. 

In Quincy, the number of 
voters registered as Demo- 
crats has been decreasing 
with the number of unen- 
rolled voters increasing. 
Last year, there were about 
210 more Democrats regis- 
tered than unenrolled. 

But the latest figures 
show the margin is half 
that. 

According to the city's 
Election Office, there are 
presently 55324 registered 
voters in Quincy. Of that to- 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



Aikens Fundraiser Tonight 
At The Four's Restaurant 



The Committee to Elect 
Marty Aikens Ward 1 Coun- 
cillor will hold a fundraiser 
tonight (Thursday) from 6 
to 8 p.m. at the Four's Res- 
taurant, 15 Cottage Ave., 
Quincy. 

Lt. Gov. Tim Murray is 
expected to attend the event, 
according to Aikens. 

Recommended donation 
is $50. 



For more information, 
contact Michael Berry, Jr. at 
617^79-2787. 

COA In Need 
Of Bath Seats 

The Council on Aging is 
in urgent need for bath seats 
for senior citizens. 

If you have one to do- 
nate, call the COA at 617- 
376-1245. 



NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR APPOINTMENT 

OF ADMINISTRATOR 

Docket No. NO09P1577EA 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

35 Shawmut Road 

Canton. MA 02021 

In the Estate of: 

Karen Marie Fowles 

a/k/a Karen M. Fowles 

Late of: Quincy, MA 021 69 

Date of Date: 03/28/09 

To all persons interested in 

the above captioned estate, a 

petition has been presented 

requesting that Stephen R. 

Fowles of Quincy, MA or 

some other suitable person 

be appointed administrator of 

said estate to serve Without 

Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
0aA)S/2009 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court. 

Date: June 25, 2009. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
7/9/09 



NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
Docket No. NO09P1625EA 
Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 
The Trial Court 
Probate and Family Court 
35 Shawmut Road 
Canton, MA 02021 
In the Estate of: 
Catherine M. Dolan 
Late of: Quincy, MA 02169 
Date of Death: 12/21/2008 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, a 
petition has been presented 
requesting that a document 
purporting to be the last will 
of said decedent be proved 
and allowed and that Francis 
J. Dolan of Quincy, MA be ap- 
pointed executorArix, named 
in the will to serve Without 
Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
Oa/1 2/200 9 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court 

Date: June 30. 2009. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
7/9/09 



tal. 24.745 are registered as 
Democrats. That's only 101 
more than the 24,644 voters 
registered as unenrolled. 

A distant third are the 
number of Republicans in 
Quincy: 5,639 That num- 
ber is down from 5.800 last 
year. 

Rounding out the regis- 
tered voters in the city are 
152 Libertarians. 73 Green- 
Rainbow and the others are 
registered under some other 
affiliation. 

Cahill, age 50. who 
once owned a small cafe in 
Quincy Center, began his 
climb up the political ladder 
as a Quincy city councillor 
at-large in 1987. He was 
re-elected seven terms and 
served until 2003. 

Cahill, who has earned 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
Docket No. NO09P1578EA 
Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 
The Trial Court 
Probate and Family Court 
35 Shawmut Road 
Canton, MA 02021 
In the Estate of: 
Eileen C. Sullivan 
Late of: Quincy, MA 02169 
Date of Death: 03/08/2009 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, a 
petition has been presented 
requesting that a document 
purporting to be the last will 
of said decedent be proved 
and allowed and that John 
L. Sullivan of Medfield, MA 
be appointed executor/trix, 
named in the will to serve 
Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
Qa/Q5Z2QQ9 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court 

Date: June 25. 2009 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Protiate 

7/9/09 



a reputation as a fiscal con- 
servative, also served as 
treasurer of Norfolk Countv 
from 1997 to2(X)3. He won 
his first bid for state- wide 
office in 2(XJ2 when he was 
elected state treasurer and 
receiver general Cahill was 
re-elected state treasurer in 
2006 and would be up for 
re-election next year if he 
does not run for governor. 

He is expected to make a 
decision about a gubernato- 
nal bid by September. 

Cahill received a bache- 
lor of arts degree in political 
science from Boston Uni- 
versity in 1981. He and his 
wife Tina have four children 
and live in Quincy. 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
Docket No. NO09P1586EA 
Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 
The Trial Court 
Probate and Family Court 
Norfolk Probate 
and Family Court 
35 Shawmut Road 
Canton, MA 02021 
In the Estate of: 
Eleanor B. Nichols 
a/k/a Eleanor B. Norris 
Late of: Quincy, MA 021 71 
Date of Death: 04/03/2009 
To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, a 
petition has been presented 
requesting that a document 
purporting to be the last will 
of said decedent be proved 
and allowed and that Lorrel 
B. Nichols of Quincy, MA 
be appointed executor/trix, 
named in the will to serve 
Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO. YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
08 A)5/2009 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16 

WITNESS, Hon. Rot>ert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court 

Date: June 26. 2009 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Protwte 

7/9/09 



Piige 26 Tits Quincy Siu& Thursday, July 9, 2009 



—x 




raBES 



FOR SALE 



BLUE HILL 
CEMETERY 

Single lot for 2 burials incl. 

2 custom built vaults 

1 bronze memorial 

321-474-2374 



FOR SALE- 2005 

HONDA SHADOW 750 

Dark blue and black with chrome 
8,000 miles, saddle bags and 

windshield. Mint condition 
$5500 - John 617-773^761 
'Smart people ride a bike' 



i> 



7 SALON STATIONS: 

4 are light wood-like 
formica... $400 

3 are maple cabinet 

stations with blue tops 

(can be used in a kitchen) 

4, 4x5 mirrors 

included... $300 

2 lighted glass 
display cases... $100 

1 lighted glass tower 
display case... $150 
All are in excellent condition 
Call Nanci at 781-956-6903 



WANTED 



OLD HAND TOOLS 
& BOOKS WANTED 

Planes, chisels, adzes, shaves, 

machinist, and sheetmetal IodIs, 

calipers, clamps, anvils, vises. 

USEFUL TOOLS, ALL TRADES. 

New England history books 

Collections; old postcards, toys, 

military, hunting and fishing items. 

LIBERTY TOOL CO. 

888-405-2007 

Da vistownmuseum .org 

e-Store & antique sale! 1 1 



FOR SALE 



Aquariums: 

135 gallon acrylic and base, 
90 and 60 gallon tank, hood, 

bases, $750, $250, $100 
respecitively, Complete Sets 

617-481-1579 



2 LARGE MIRRORS- 

like new, $25 each. 

Sizes: 3'x4' and 3'x5'; 

PAPER SHREDDER, $5 

Call Susan 617-770-7918 



7/9 



OLD ELECTRIC 
CRAFTSMAN DRILL 

with over 20 bits, various 
sizes— fifoocy condition.. .$5i 
Call 617-328-1325 79 



MAPLE, TWIN BUNK 
BEDS & KING SIZE 
RECLINER CHAIR- 

good condition. Best Offer. 
Marilyn 617-328-5087 



7/9 



CRIB: sleigh-style, 

natural wood. . .used 

for just 1 child, $75. 

Call 857-939-0490 



18' FIBERGLASS 
BOAT CUDDY CABIN 

Solid galvanized bunk trailer, 

1986 90hp Johnson cranks over, 

has electrical problem... $595 

CallJohn 617-471-3666 



MISCELLANEOUS 



AUTOMOBILES 

DONATE YOUR VE- 



7/9 



HICLE RECEIVE FREE 
VACATION Voucher 
United Breast Cancer 
Foundation Free Mam- 
mograms, Breast Can- 
cer info www.ubcf.info 
FREE towing, Fast, Non- 
Runners Accepted, 24/7 
1-888-468-5964 

BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITY 

ALL CASH VENDING! 

Do you earn $800 in a 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



PERSONAL 



Happy 90th Birthday 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



to 



Doris (Blake) Menz on July 4th. 

Doris has been a Hough's Neck resident 

for 75 years. Married to the late Deputy 

Chief John Menz for 63 years. Children, 

John Menz Jr., George Menz, Doug 

Menz, Cheryl Lynn & Carol Walter. 7/'^ 



SoPH/A AIeaZ. will 

celebrate her 1st Birthday on 

July 7th. Daughter of Jim & 

Heather Menz, granddaughter 

of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Mitchell 

and John & Eileen Menz 

7/9 



GOD BLESS OLIN TAYLOR- 

A GENTLEMAN AND 

A PATRIOT AND A VERY 

KIND MAN, BRAVO! 



7/9 



-FROMAQUINCYSUN 

READER (QSP.3 6-1 1-09) 



FOR SALE 




Ml SIB 

General Contractor 



New Homes, Additions, 

Kitchens & Baths, 

Remodeling, Decl(s, Roofing 

Lie. & Ins. cs#869i 5 Rpbert MoHie 

^H1C# 1 473032 ^ 1 7- 786- 1 648 

-— — 

See our Website www.mainstreetbuild.com 86 



MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS 



CHILTON & HAYNES 
Repair Manuals, 1 each 

95-03 Chilton; 95-01 Haynes & 

original 96+ Ford Windstar 
owners guide. All for $30 (face 
value all, $60) 617-479-2012 



7/9 



LESSONS 



SUMMER VOICE 
LESSONS 

Learn healthy singing techniques, 

build confidence, learn to read 

music, improve posture and 

breathing and so much more! 

Tracy O'Sullivan 617-773.5587 



7/30 



MISCELLANEOUS 



day? Your own local can- 
dy route. Includes 25 Ma- 
chines and Candy, all for 
$9,995. 1-800-921-3949 

EMPLOYMENT 

Now Available! 2009 
POST OFFICE JOBS. 

$18-$20/HR No Expe- 
rience, Paid Training, 
Fed Benefits, Vacations. 
CALL 1-800-910-9941 
today! REF #MA09 



HELP WANTED 

AVON! Career or pocket 
money, you decide! Up to 
50% commission profit. 
Low start up. Email ISR 
Lwilber@aol.com or call 
toll free 1-800-258-1815 
SLT IMMEDIATE 

OPENINGS for CDLA 
drivers willing to team. 
$1000 sign-on bonus. 
$1100/wk minimum pay. 
Hazmat & 1 yr experi- 
ence. Background check 
required. 1-800-835- 
9471 

HOME 
IMPROVEMENT 

EARL'S POWER WASH/ 
EXTERIOR PAINTING. 

Washing starting at $1 50. 
Licensed/insured, hard 
working, honest con- 
tractor, Free estimates. 
Credit cards accepted. 
Licensed - CT-#501225, 
Rl-#26194. 1-800-273- 
4650, www.aehomeim- 
provements.com 

HAS YOUR BUILDING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-044 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as anriended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 
21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy 
MA 021 69. On the application of Costas Blathras for a Finding 
to expand the residential living use into an existing 11'x18' 
portion of the rear dwelling in violation of Title 1 7 as amended 
Chapter 17.24.020 (alterations, nonconfornning) on the prem- 
ises numbered 37 RAWSON ROAD, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09, 7/9/09 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-046 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 
21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy 
MA 02169. On the application of Samir Shenonda for a Vari- 
ance to construct a third story addition in violation of Title 1 7 
as amended Chapter 1 7.20.040 (dimensional) on the premises 
numbered 133 EDGEWATER DRIVE, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09, 7/9/09 



SHSFTEDORSETTLED? 

Contact Woodford Broth- 
ers Inc, for straightening, 
leveling, foundation and 
wood frame repairs at 
1-800-OLD-BARN. www. 
woodfordbros.com 

LAND FOR SALE 

297' MAINE RIV- 
ERFRONT only 
$54,900(Was $84,900). 
Great Owner Financing. 
Buildable 7 acre parcel 
on river in the heart of 
lakes region. Coastal 
amenities close by. 3 hrs. 
Boston. Motivated seller. 
L&S Realty 207-781- 
3294 

NYS Land Sale For Out- 
door Sportsman - Large 
White Water River 16 
Acres - $99,900. -5 Acres 
w/New Hunter's Camp 
$19,900. -DEER WOOD- 
LANDS 20 Acres-Bor- 
ders State $29,900. 50 
Acres -$59,900, -Borders 
State Forest 13 Acres 
-$25,900. -Salmon River 
Area -10 Acres Lake- 
front -$49,900, Over 150 
Lands, Lakes, & Camps, 
For top notch hunters & 
fisherman see pictures 
at www.LandandCamps. 
com or Call 800-229- 
7843 For a Private Tour. 
NYS LAND SALE JULY 
SPECIAL! 10 Acres- 
Lakefront WAS: $79,900 
NOW: $49,900. 5 Acres 
w/Rustic Camp Salmon 
River Area $19,900. 46 



Acres- Borders State- 
land, ponds, foodplot 
$59,900. 4 Acres in 
Southern Tier #1 Deer 
County! WAS: $16,900 
NOW: $8,900. Over 100 
different properties. Many 
sizes & areas. Trees, 
ponds, lakes & streams 
www.landandcamps.com 
800-229-7843 Christmas 
& Associates 
Sunday River Area 
Maine LAND LIQUI- 
DATION Huge Moun- 
tain Views! 60.72 Acres 
$89,900!! 90% Owner Fi- 
nancing Beautiful moun- 
tain views. Warranty 
Deed. Guaranteed Build- 
able. (877) 640-5263- 7 
days. NorthernAcres. 
com/NECAN 

MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 

AWARD WINNING 

Kayak pools Looking for 
Demo Home sites SAVE 
$1500! Free Survey 
1-800-752-9000 www. 
Ambassadorpools.com 
CHERRY BEDROOM 
SET. Solid Wood, never 
used, brand new in facto- 
ry boxes. English Dove- 
tail. Original cost $4500. 
Sell for $795. Can deliver. 
Call Tom 617-395-0373 
LEATHER LIVING 

ROOM SET in original 
plastic, never used. Orig- 
inal price $3,000, sacri- 
fice $975. Call Bill 857- 
453-7764 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-045 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 
21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy 
MA 02169. On the application of Ken Wong for a Finding to 
change the use from a convenient store to a learning center 
in violation of Title 17 as amended Chapter 17.24.020 (non- 
conforming structure) on the premises numbered 488-492 
HANCOCK STREET QUINCY 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09. 7/9/09 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-047 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 
21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street, Quincy MA 
021 69. On the application of Donna Flemming for a Variance/ 
Finding to legalize an existing independent basement unit in 
violation of Title 17 as amended Chapter 17.16 (use regula- 
tions) and Chapter 17.28 (off street parking) on the premises 
numbered 265 WINTHROP STREET QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09, 7/9/09 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-048 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 
21, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy 
MA 02169 On the application of Sprint Spectrum L.P. and its 
affiliate Clear Wireless, LLC for a Special Permit to modify its 
existing installation to add two (2) wireless backhaul dishes 
on the rooftop in violation of Title 17 as amended Chapter 
1 7.06.040 (wireless) on the premises numbered 1 000 SOUTH- 
ERN ARTERY, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/2/09. 7/9/09 



Thursday, July 9, 2009 TT&« QuincT* Sim Pa«e 27 




raeee 



FOR RENT 



HALL RENTAL 

GEORGE F.BRYAN 

POST #613 

24 Broad St., Quincy, MA 

Rentals for all Occasions 

617-472-6234 

617-479-2254 



SONS OF ITALY 
Social Center 

IZOQuarry St.. Quincy 

Call now to hook your Party 

and other Special Events 

617-472-5900 

www.QuincySOIxom ii 



MORRISETTE 
LEGION POST " 

81 83 Liberty St., Quincy 

Function Hall Available 

Call for Details 

617-770-4876 

Internet Capable • Weddings • 

Showers • Christenings • Meetings 



WOLLASTON YACHT CLUB 

Quincy Shore Drive 

Function Hall Available 
All Occasions 

May thru Oct. • 617-472-9796 
City & Ocean Views ^^^ 



MISC. SERVICES 



PRESERVE 

YOUR 
MEMORIES 

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7 10 



D. J.*B XJlfLIMITSD 

4rs-iV0W/ Weddings 

Anniversary - Birthdays 

Family Functions-Trivia Game 

Karaoke - Fun ^,^ 

617-773-1904 



AMERICAN LEGION POST 380 

1116 SEA STREET, QUINCY 
HALL FOR RENT 

Full Liquor License 
Kitchen Facilities available 
Contact: Functions Manager 
617-479-6149 '> 



CONDO 

FOR RENT 



FT. MYERS 
BEACH CONDO 

during Spring Training 

Available March 1 3 - 27 

Call 617388-3128 7. 



LOCAL PAINTER 

CUP & SAVE 

Average Room - walls $150 

Ceilings $75. Also windows, 

doors, trim, etc. Inside or out. 

Prompt, clean service. 

Kevin 781-331-5392 

Cell 508-221-1447 



CLASSES 



Children's Art Classes 

for children 9-12 

Painting, Drawing & Sculpture 

Call Paul Andrade 

617-460-0749 

for brochure and info. ^^ 



Save Gas 

and Money, 

Shop Locally 



SERVICES 



Children's Ceramic Classes 

Wed. &Thurs. 11:30 am- 1:00 pm 
starting July 15th, call for info. 

E & T Ceramics 
367 Billings Rd., Wollaston 
617-479-4107 79 



ROOMMATE 
WANTED 



I'm a 33-yr. old. single, professional 

woman looking for a roommate 

to share my 3 BR. 2 BA house 

in-ground pool. Sorry, no pets or 

children. Smoking on the enclosed 

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ASAP- $780 inc. everything 

email: daisyz76(a aol.com 730 



SERVICES 



Jim Riley 



Riley Construction 

Commercial & Residential Roofing All Phases 
Windows and Gutters 




27 Beebe Road 
Quincy, MA 02169 
(617)472-3335 



Licensed & Fully Insured 

Mass Reg #138824 

Free Estimates 



K/2() 



M 

Matthew 
Nicholls 

(617) 
293-9396 



M.J. NICHOLLS LANDSCAPING 

Design & Construction 

Masonry • Walkways • Stairs 

Retaining Walls • Drainage 

Watergardens • Excavation 

Pavers & Asphalt Driveways 

Hydroseeding, Maintenance Services, Plantings & much More 

www.nichollsIandscaping.com q/, 



DCs YARD MAINTENANCE 



Free 
Estimates 



CLEAN UPS 



Fully 
Insured 



Sealcoating 
Serious About Service 

617-786-9558 

Edging ♦ Weeding ♦ Mulching ♦ Small Tree Removal 

Hedge & Shrub Trimming or Removal ♦ Dethatching ♦ Rototilling 

Over Seeding ♦ Complete Yard Maintenance ♦ Lawn Mowing 



SERVICES 



JUNK REMOVAL 

Clean-Outs 
Dumpster Rentals 

Final Pick 
617-251-6242 

finaiplckservice8.com 



SAVE 

Budget Fuel 



Fuel Assistance 

Senior Discount 

Full Service 

617-328-4063 

TF 



SERVICES 



S.G. HAROLD 

PLLMBI.NG, HEATINC; & AC 

Specializing in Viessman Boiler 
Unico Air Conditioning 

Home heating repairs & service 
Radiant Floor heating 

Quincy 
617-471-0914 

Unprecedented Service Tailored to You 

MA Ik flOSK4 II 



IMAGE A 
LANDSCAPING 

Spring Clean-ups 

We clean it, trim it, 
remove it. . . 

Quality Workmanship 
SINCE 1972 

Free Estimates 
Fully Insured 

617-471-0044 



SiLENZi Roofing 
& Remodeung 

Rubljer & Shingle Roofing • Rot & 

Termite Repair • Replacement Doors 

& Windows • Carpentry & Painting 

(781) 588-6971 K 



SERVICES 



POWER PLUMBING 

Plumbing, Heating. Gas Fitting 

Repairs • New Installations 

Dave 617-328-3007 

Emergencies 617-792-4054 
Master LiciC 13749 n 



SERVICES 



PFC Plumbing* Heating 

REPAIRS 

NEW INSTALUTIONS 

GAS FiniNG, HEATING 

PAT 

Lic.#3i63«-J 617-750-3617 



T&M 
Landscape Co. 

• Spring & Fall Cleanups 

• Power Washing 

• Lawn Mowing Services 

• Yard Mulching 

• Bushes & Trees Trimmed 

Free Estimates 

617-733-4554 

~ Affordable Rates 



TJC 



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MOVERS 
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Comm. & Res. 
Free Estimates 

508-588-0007 




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Sales, Service^ 
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Since 1945 

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115 Franklin Street, 
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hancocktvandappliance.com 



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The Q\xin.C3r 



CLASSIFIED AD FORM 




MAIL TO: 



INDEX 

LI Services 

□ For Sale 
LJ Autos 
U Boats 

□ For Rent 
G Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 
lJ Pets 

G Lost & Found 

□ Real Estate 

□ Antiques 

□ Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 

□ Instruction 

□ Daycare 
U Personal 

LI Miscellaneous 



THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 

RATES 

1 WEEK -I S8.()0 for one insertion, up to 20 words. 

lOc for each additional word. 

3-7 WEEKS -J $7.(K) per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad. 10c each additional word. 

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DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 4PM. PLEASE INC LI DE YOl R PHONE Nl MBER IN AD. 



Page 28 Tl&e Quinoy Sxux Thursday, July 9, 2009 



•\ 



Merrymount Parade Celebrates Independence Day 



w«"i%«» 




MARiACHi CfROLiP marches in Saturday's Merrymount Fourth of July Parade 




GILLIGAN'S ISLAND Float waves to parade watchers at the corner of Algonquin and Norton 
A Roads in Merrymount during the Fourth of July Parade Saturday. 




MOBILE ARMY SURGICAL HOSPITAL (aka M*A*S*H unit) float proceeds along Quincy 
Shore Drive during Saturday's Fourth of July Parade in Merrymount. 



AMERICAN'S (;() 1 TALENT float from Hobomack Road seeks Merrymount residents to '*try 
out" for the show during Saturday's Fourth of July Parade. 



^^Safon ^eo 




(617) 479-5340 



Hair • Nails • Waxing • Skincare 
672 Hancock St^ Quincy, MA 02170 (Woliaston Center) 




'foOFF 

Haircirts & Nail Services 



Ust time dkms only) 



NEWBURY STREET, BOSTON 
QUALITY AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 



COPELAND PACKAGE STORE, INC. 

BEER,WINES & LIQUORS 




Dennis Carson 
273 Copeland St. 
In Quincy, Ma 02169 

WrttS (617) 471-5418 •(617)472-7012 



Quincy Sun Photos 
By Robert Noble 



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CAMTON,AVA-m^W.lTS2COOLCOM'- 877.487.2266 



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STRATEGIES 



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MORE REASON FOR UNINSURED MOTORIST COVERAGE 



Insurance experts have long 
recommended the inclusion of 
"uninsured motorist coverage" 
in auto policies as a means of 
protecting oneself from drivers 
without insurance. According 
to recent statistics, having this 
coverage is more important than 
drivers might expect. It seems that 
the current economic downturn has 
led increasing numbers of motorists 
to drop their auto policies. In fact, 
the Insurance Research Council 
expects that, by next year, one 
of every six drivers on U.S. 
roadways is likely to be uninsured. 
The council's report goes on to 
point out that an increase in the 
unemployment rate of 1 percentage 
point was directly associated 
with an increase in the uninsured 
motorist rate of more than three- 
quarters of a percentage point. 



The recession has led many 
people to cut back spending in 
various areas. Unfortunately, one 
area is on auto insurance. This 
increases your chances of being in 
an accident with an uninsured driver. 
Please call JAMES J. SULLIVAN 
INSURANCE AGENCY at 617- 
328-8600 to learn about our auto 
policies. We can evaluate your 
current policy or prepare a new 
policy. We offer free quotes by 
phone, transfer discounts, and 
installment payments. As an 
independent insurance agency, we 
offer competitive rates and prompt 
settlements of claims. We are located 
at 151 Hancock Street. 

Note: According to statistics 
compiled by the Federal Highway 
Administration, 33 million drivers 
across the United States will be 
driving without coverage by the end 
of this year. 




llinilPM 



39th Annual Quincy Cent^ 
Sidewalk Festival Opens Today 

Pages 8&9 




Tlie Quincy 



Historic Quinc\;'s Hometown Weekly Newspaper Since 1968 




o 5h 
cox 

!? o 

-< 9i> 
^ .^^ 

'JO i; 

•^ 21 
O 0^. 

c 



to 
I 



VOL 41 No. 44 



Thursday, July 16, 2009 




In Contract 's First Year 

Recycling Up 

700 Tons, Saves 

City $310,000 



PRESIDENTIAL WREATH is placed on the tomb of John 
Quincy Adams commemorating the 242nd birthday anniver- 
sary of the 6th President of the United States. The tomb is lo- 
cated in the crypt of United First Parish Church in Quincy 
Center. From left are: Lt. Commander Christopher Orlowski 
of the Quincy Naval Reserve Center; Mr. and Mrs. Peter Boyl- 



ston Adams, Arthur Ducharme. director. Historic Interpretive 
Program; and wreath bearers. In the background are William 
Westland, Mayor Tom Koch and Caroline Keinath, deputy 
superintendent of the Adams National Historical Park. Other 
Photos on Page 17, 

Ouimv Sun Photo/ Robert Noble 



City residents increased 
household ret> cling by 700 
tons and reduced garbage by 
more than 2,000 tons in the 
first year of a new regional 
trash collection contract. 
Mayor Thomas Koch an- 
nounced Tuesday. 

Officials said the re- 
cycling number maybe 
a record, producing total 
savings of S3 10,(KX) tor tax- 
payers. That number is over 
and above cost reductions 
to date from the new trash 
contract that combined the 
buying power of Quincy, 



Braintree and Wev mouth. 

"These are great num- 
bers, for both our environ- 
ment and our pocketbcK)k. 
It shows clearly what com- 
ing together and working in 
the best interest of the city 
can do," Koch said. "This is 
only the beginning, though. 
We expect to continue to in- 
crease recycling, and reduce 
trash, in the \ears ahead "" 

Koch. Mavor Sue Ka) ot 
VK'eymouth and Mavor Jo- 
seph Sullivan oi Braintree 
negotiated a hrst-of-its-kind 

Cont (i<Jn Pai;e II 



John Q. Adams' Service To City, Nation Remembered 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

President John Quincy 
Adams, the sixth president 
of the United States, got due 
honor this year, not only in 
his hometown but across the 
world as people celebrated 
his contributions to this 
country, to justice, and to in- 



ternational relations. 

In Quincy this weekend, 
there was a triple-header for 
Adams' admirers who pon- 
dered his boyhood at the 
dedication of the Abigail Ad- 
ams Cairn, saluted his skill 
in international relations at 
Adams National Historical 



Park, and observed the anni- 
versary of his birth at Presi- 
dents' Church, Quincy. 

"It's unfortunate that 
many people regard John 
Quincy as merely the son of 
the President John Adams," 
said Arthur Ducharme, Di- 
rector of the Historic Inter- 



pretive Program at L'nited 
First Parish Church, Presi- 
dents' Church. 

Ducharme called John 
Quincy Adams "one of 
America's greatest leaders. 
No one was ever so well 
qualified to be president." 

Fears that President John 



Quincy Adams' legacy is 
overshadowed by his fa- 
ther's deeds should fade 
away this year as tributes to 
JQA as he's called stretched 
from Quincy and New 
Hampshire across oceans to 
Russia. 

Ducharme organized the 



first Adams' tribute of the 
weekend on Frida\, the e\e 
of the 242"'' anniversar\ of 
Adams" birthda\ with the 
annual laying of the presi- 
dential wreath at his crypt in 
Presidents" Church, Quincy 
Center. 

Cont'd On Pa^e 17 



Over 100 Witness Time Capsule Buried In Cairn 



Neighborhood Photography Newspapers y 
Commemorative Coins Among Artifacts 

An adapted original 
poem by former U.S. Poet 
Laureate Robert Pinsky, a 
nei ghborhood photograph , 
newspapers, scanned cop- 
ies of 1 12-year-old artifacts, 
and commemorative coins 
are among the items now 
buried for the ages in a new 
time capsule inside the reno- 
vated Abigail Adams Cairn. 

Mayor Thomas Koch, 
Ward 2 Councillor Daniel 
Raymondi, and the Quincy 
Historical Society joined 
more than 100 residents at 
a ceremony atop Penn's Hill 
on Saturday morning dedi- 
cating the rebuilt 113-year- 
old Cairn, reconstructed 
Cont'd On Page 16 

lllllill 

i^0 4»7t"OC«1O 




INSCRIPTION OF GRANITE TABLET placed in front of the 
time capsule that was sealed inside the restored Abigail Adams 
Cairn. 



TABLET IS EMPLACED in front of the sealed-ofT time capsule that was placed inside the 
Abigail Adams Cairn during a ceremony Saturday. From left are Abigail Koch, daughter of 
Mayor Tom Koch; Ward 2 Councillor Dan Raymondi; and Mayor Koch. Other photos from the 
ceremony appear on Page 16. Quincx Sun Pfwtos/ Robert Soble 



QMC, S.S. Hospital In Clinical Collaboration - Page 2 ♦ Fire Prevention Grant - Page 32 



03 

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« 
« 

n 
i> 

70 

\ 

72 

H 



CD 

I 

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Page 2 Tlie Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2009 



$848^74 For Homeless Prevention To Meet Health Needs of Communities Served; 

Will Not Combine Boards, Finances Or Assets 

QMC,S 5. Hospital 
In Clinical Collaboration 



The city will receive 
$848,274 under the Ameri- 
can Recovery and Reinvest- 
ntient Act ("Stimulus Bill") 
for the implementation of 
the Homeless Prevention 
and Rapid Re-housing pro- 
gram under the U S . Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban 
Development. 

The announcement was 
made Tuesday by Mayor 
Thomas Koch and Planning 
Director Dennis E. Har- 



rington. 

The funding will be al- 
located to Father Bill's and 
MainSpring (FBM) and 
Quincy Community Action 
Programs (QCAP) as sub- 
grantees under the program. 

FBM proposes to provide 
flexible funding for rent and 
housing related services for 
homeless individuals who 
are utilizing shelter services. 
Funding will also be used to 



prevent "at risk" individuals 
from becoming homeless. 

FBM proposes to assist 
an estimated 90 individuals 
under the program. 

QCAP's utilization of 
these funds will focus on 
providing comprehensive 
homeless prevention and 
rapid re-housing services to 
an estimated 1 10 families. 

The city anticipates the 
program will begin Oct. 1 . 



Audit To Be Available On Internet 



For the first time, the 
city's independent audit will 
be made readily available to 
the public on the Internet via 
the new www.QuincyMA. 
gov site, Mayor Thomas 
Koch announced Tuesday. 

The fiscal year 2008 Au- 
dit Management Letter writ- 
ten by the Wakefield- based 
firm of Powers and Sullivan 
is the last audit available, 
covering the budget that 
took effect July 1 , 2007. 

"We continue to open our 
books, and making this au- 
dit readily available to the 
public is part of that pro- 



cess," Koch said. "This is 
an important document that 
identified a series of prob- 
lems that we confronted 
upon taking office, gave us 
a road map to solve them, 
and continues to be the basis 
for ongoing and necessary 
reforms" 

The audit outlined a se- 
ries of financial shortfalls 
within the city, including 
millions of dollars in Water 
and Sewer fees being used 
to pay the Police and Fire 
Department's budgets and 
unbudgeted payments for 
the 2007 Honeywell man- 
agement plan. 



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Koch said the adminis- 
tration has focused intently 
on solving those problems 
in its first two years, adding 
that concrete progress has 
been made and backed up 
by positive credit ratings. 

The letter will be avail- 
able in the Mayor's Office 
section of the Quincy MA. 
gov homepage, just below a 
link for the fiscal year 2010 
budget, Koch said. 

Adding important docu- 
ments is a key feature of 
the new site, which was 
launched officially last 
week, Koch added. 

The new site, designed by 
Cyclone Design of Quincy, 
boasts a series of new fea- 
tures previously unavailable 
to city residents, including 
online transactions, and up- 
dated calendar of commu- 
nity events and government 
meetings, an e-mail and 
text-messaging alert system 
and a new streamlined on- 
line platform for requesting 
city services. 



Quincy Medical Center 
and South Shore Hospital 
in South Weymouth have 
announced that they will en- 
ter into a clinical affiliation 
to improve local access to 
quality-focused, cost-effec- 
tive health care services. 

As part of this process, 
both the Quincy Medical 
Center and South Shore 
Hospital governing boards 
recently authorized their 
institutions' move forward 
to finalize this affiliation 
agreement. 

The two hospitals are 
currently reviewing commu- 
nity needs and areas where a 
combined effort could more 
effectively meet the health 
needs of the communities 
they both serve. The clini- 
cal affiliation will not in- 
volve combining the boards, 
finances or assets of the two 
hospitals. 

Gary Gibbons, MD, 
FACS, Quincy Medical 
Center president and chief 
executive officer, said, "This 
is an historic time for Quin- 
cy Medical Center. We have 
an unprecedented opportu- 
nity to develop an affiliation 
to continue to provide com- 
prehensive, high-quality 
health care services. This 
is one more step in fulfill- 




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DR. GARY GIBBONS 

ing our vision of increasing 
our ability to provide more 
care locally. It's ultimately 
better for patients and their 
families and, it's much more 
cost-efficient." 

Richard H. Aubut, South 
Shore Hospital president 
and chief executive officer, 
said, "Both Quincy Medi- 
cal Center and South Shore 
Hospital share a common 
goal - to assure that care is 
provided in the appropriate 
setting for quality, patient 
safisfaction, safety, and ef- 
ficiency. Working together, 
our two organizations look 
forward to improving the 
availability and accessibil- 
ity of quality health care 
services." 

Additional announce- 
ments about specific clinical 
programs will be made in 
coming months. 

Quincy Medical Center 
is a 196-bed acute care com- 
munity-teaching hospital, 
providing the highest qual- 



RICHARDH. AUBUT 

ity, most personalized and 
comprehensive medical and 
surgical services to patients 
throughout the South Shore. 
A private, nonprofit hospi- 
tal , QMC has played a vital 
role in the community since 
1890, serving the needs of 
its diverse patient population 
without exception. QMC 
is an academic affiliate of 
Boston University School 
of Medicine, and is a leader 
in quality benchmarks both 
state and nationwide. 

South Shore Hospital is 
a 318-bed, not-for-profit, 
tax-exempt, charitable pro- 
vider of acute, emergency, 
outpatient, home health, and 
hospice care to the people 
of Southeastern Massachu- 
setts. South Shore Hospital's 
home care division includes 
South Shore Visiting Nurse 
Association, Hospice of the 
South Shore, and Home & 
Health Resources. The hos- 
pital's 820-member medical 
staff represents all leading 
medical specialties. 



Miiiiiiiii 



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X - 



BY Jeffrey M. Bertman 

GRADUATE GEMOLOGIST 






UP TO YOUR NECK IN JEWELS 

Current fashion calls for wear- loom pieces that can be updated 



ing outsized necklaces with large 
beads, big pendants, and layered 
metallic motifs that swarm high 
about the neck, looking much 
like a jeweled scarf. Taking in- 
spiration from pieces worn by 
English royalty and nobility, the 
idea is to wear anything that re- 
flects your personal style and 
taste, as long as it is big. With 
this in mind, we are seeing ev- 
erything from heavy crucifixes 
and layers of Victorian jet pieces, 
to gold tribal icons and colorful 
African beads, to large enameled 
flowers and slices of polished ag- 
ate being wora by fashion-mind- 
ed women. This is a trend that 
lends itself perfectly to searching 
through jewelry boxes for heir- 









m new settmgs. 

Our customers choose necklac- 
es and other fine jewelry because 
our pieces make a personal state- 
ment about them. The fashion- 
conscious people who come to 
us do so because they don't want 
to look just like their friends- 
they want to express their own 
unique, individual style. You 
aren't just another shopper when 
you visit us; you're as special as 
the designs we create. We hope 
to see you soon at 1402 Hancock 
Street, Quincy Center., for fine 
jewelry sure to suit all tastes and 
all budgets. We also offer expert 
repair and restoration services. 
PH: 617-773-3636. 

Don 't Forget: we pay cash for 
Gold - Platinum - Diamonds... 
highest prices paid. 

www.rog»rs|«w«lry.com 



Thursday, July 16,2009 The Qixincy StM> Page 3 



City Officials, Business Owners 
Welcome Preliminary Renewal Plan 



Young Planners Offer 

New Vision For 

Wollaston Center 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

City officials and busi- 
ness owners believe it's time 
to 'kick-start' a renewal of 
Wollaston Center and, last 
week welcomed prelimi- 
nary concepts developed by 
eight young urban planners 
interning at Sasaki Associ- 
ates of Watertown. 

The eight interns. Team 
Wollaston, envision a re- 
charged and vigorous Wol- 
laston Center with thriving 
retailers, business offices 
and townhouses accessible 
by wide green and brick 
paths lined with trees, per- 
haps a fountain and artwork 
inviting visitors and con- 
sumers and, even more im- 
portantly, repeat visitors and 
patrons. 

"If you can't make them 
come back, it's no good," 
Planning Director Dennis 
Harrington said prior to the 
presentation. "You have to 



have repeat business." 

Sasaki partner Jason Hel- 
lendrung,ASLA, supervised 
the team who worked pro- 
bono with the Planning De- 
partment in mid-June to de- 
velop the preliminary master 
plan presented last week at 
Wollaston Branch Library. 
The redevelopment plan in- 
volves no land-taking. 

"This is just a first step, 
some of the things that could 
happen" Kristina Johnson 
of the Planning Department 
said as she introduced the 
interns whose credentials 
include urban studies, plan- 
ning, architectural, and en- 
gineering degrees at MIT, 
Harvard, Penn, Merrimack, 
Roger Williams, and the 
University of Virginia. 

Johnson called the con- 
cept, "almost a village type" 
plan. 

Mayor Thomas Koch, 
city officials and a sprin- 



Free Wheelchair Ramp Available 

A free portable home 
wheelchair ramp is avail- 
able for anyone in need, 
announces Bruce Ayers of 



Program. 

For more information, 
contact Ayers at (617) 472- 
9877. 



the Quincy Helping Hand 



m SPORTSMAN'S OEM 

Bait & Tackle 

Hunting & Fishing Licenses Sold 

Deer Check Station • Rod & Reel Repair 

Hunting Gear & Supplies • Skate Sharpening 

666 Southern Artery 
Quincy, MA 021 69 

617-770-3884 



PAYING TOP DOLLAR 

for your unwanted jewelr}! 



■\\ vjKv '■; 



APPRAISING, 
BUYING & 
SELLING... 



Del Greco 



^(^//m 



399 Washington Street Route 53 Weymouth 

LOCATED OFF RT. 3. EXIT 16A. TO RT. 53N 

781.337.5069 

hours; Monday - Friday 9 - 5 • Saturday 9:30 - 2 



kling of business owners 
and residents, welcomed the 
plans as a starting point for 
discussion and a makeover 
for the area, the second larg- 
est retail district in the city. 

The plans contained "a 
lot of good ideas," and could 
"kick-start development 
for Wollaston," said Dean 
Rizzo, executive director, 
Quincy 2000 Collaborative. 

Team Wollaston focused, 
first, on the four to five acre 
parking lot at Wollaston T 
Station where they rendered 
Beale Street Park, recom- 
mended a 765-spot parking 
garage, as well as 300,000 
sq. ft. of new housing, re- 
tail and office development 
with ample clusters of green 
space on 1 .2 acres and wide 
walkways. 

In addition, Beale Street 
would offer the only En- 
trance to the T station which 
should draw more commut- 
ers into the area's business 
district. 

Under their plan, Beale 
Street remains the magnet 
and the main street corridor 
with enhanced retail activity 
on smaller blocks with im- 

Cont'd On Page 32 




DUNKIN' BRANDS, parent company of Dunkin' DonuLs and Baskin-Robbins. recently opened 
its 15,000'" store worldwide in Raleigh, North Carolina. To commemorate this milestone, the 
very first Dunkin' Donuts store located in Quincy had a large celebraiion of its own. Quincy 
Dunkin* Donuts made a charitable contribution of $1,500 to the (iermantown Neighborh(M)d 
Center, which provides critical support services to youth and families of the (iermantown com- 
munity of Quincy. In addition to the $1,500 giveaway, Dunkin* Donuts gave the lucky customer 
who walked in at exactly 1500 hours (military time) a check for $1,500. From left to right are: 
Shannon Maxwell,director of Field Marketing for Dunkin Donuts'; Dunkin Donuts' Franchisee 
Octavio Carvalho, Kathy Quigley, director of (iermantown Neighborhood Center: Dunkin Do- 
nuts' Franchisee Victor Carvalho; and Tricia Dellamano, general manager for Quincy Donuts 
Inc. 

Director Ann MclMUghlin Says: 

Patrons Understand Library's 
Budget Cuts, Weekend Closings 



Library trustees and ad- 
ministrators had to make 
hard choices to survive re- 
cent budget cuts and that 
included closing the library 
weekends in July and Au- 
gust but patrons have been 
understanding, according to 
Director Ann McLaughlin. 

"People were disap- 
pointed we were closed," 
McLaughlin said but added 
that people understood the 
library directors had hard 
choices: branch closings or 



weekend closings. 

"Branch hours were not 
cut." McLaughlin said, cit- 
ing the Trustees' decision 
to protect the city's branch 
libraries. 

To date, the library's 
20 10 budget sustained a 
10% or $281,000 cut, ac- 
cording to McLaughlin who 
said administrators had to 
consider the overtime costs 
for Sundays and a differen- 
tial for Saturdays for a sav- 
ings of over $30,000 which 



represents one salary 

Weekend hours weren't 
the only cut, according to 
McLaughlin who said the 
library had to reduce it bo<ik 
budget by $100,000. but did 
try to avoid staff layoffs. 

"We had to be creative." 
said McLaughlin who 
steered Comcast funding to 
the department's technology 
access needs. 

Unless there are further 
budget cuts. McLaughlin 
plans on restonng weekend 
hours in September 



Looking for 

a Jumbo 

mortgage? 



6.04 



30-YEAR FIXED 
NO POINTS 



% 



APR 



You shouldn't have to pa/ a 
jumbo rate to get a Jumbo 
mortgage. At Colonial Federal 
Savings Bank, you don't! With 
our Jumbo mortgage, you get 
a 30 -Year fixed rate loan. It's 
simple, easy and guaranteed with 
no points and no pre-payment 
penalties. Our experienced loan 
officers mean your closing will 
happen as scheduled . . . and you 
can be sure we'll be there with 
your check. Buying? Refinancing? 
Need $417,000 or more? Come 
see us. Or call Richard or Angela 
at 617-471-0750. 




COLONIAL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS BANK 

"Your neighborhood bank!" 

QUINCY: 15 Beach Street 617-471-0750 • 1000 Southern Artery (Residents only) 617-479-1430 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin Street 781-767-1776 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Middle & Washington Streets 781-331-1776 • www.colonialfed.com 

Some additional facts: Annual Percentage Rate (APR) effective as of 07/08/09 and may change. 
Applies to 1-2 family owner-occupied homes. Assumes a maximum 80% loan-to-value and first 
mortgage position. A 30-Year Jumbo Loan would be repaid in 360 equal monthly payments of 
$5.99 per $1000 borrowed. Subject to credit approval. Escrow tax payments may change 



LENDER 
Insured FDIC 



Page 4 Tl&e Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2008 



The Quincy 




(USPS 453-060) 

Published Weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co., Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy. MA 02169 

Robert H. Bosworth 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Founder 
1968-2009 

50c per copy. $25.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$30.00 per year by mail outside Quincy - $38.00 out-of-state 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 Fax: 617-472-3963 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to; 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 021 69 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financtal responsibility tor typographical errors in 
advertisements txjt will reprint that part of an advertisement in which the typographical 
error occurs. 




DonH Bet Against CahilFs Gamble 





Moments 
in time 

THE HISTORY CHANNEL 



CAHILL 



• On July 15, 1888, 

the Bandai volcano erupts 
on the Japanese island of 
Honshu, killing hundreds 
and burying many nearby 
villages in ash. The explo- 
sive eruptions sent debris 
thousands of feet into the 
air and left an 8,000-foot- 
wide crater in the earth. The 
resulting cloud of ash and 
steam was estimated at 4 
miles wide. 

•On July 18, 1925, sev- 
en months after being re- 
leased from Landsberg jail, 
Nazi leader Adolf Hitler 
publishes the first volume 
of his personal manifesto, 
"Mein Kampf ' ("My Strug- 
gle"). The autobiographical 
work soon became the bible 
of Germany's Nazi Party. 

• On July 19, 1935, the 

first automatic parking me- 
ter in the U.S., the Park-O- 
Meter invented by Carlton 
Magee, was installed in 
Oklahoma City by the Dual 
Parking Meter Company. 
Twenty-foot spaces were 
painted on the pavement, 
and a parking meter that ac- 
cepted nickels was planted 
in the concrete at the head 
of each space. 

• On July 16, 1948, 

"Key Largo," starring Hum- 
phrey Bogart and Lauren 
Bacall, opens in New York. 
The film, about a mobster 



holding guests hostage in a 
Florida hotel during a hur- 
ricane, was the last of three 
movies that Bogart and Ba- 
call made together. 

•On July 17, 1955, Dis- 
neyland - Walt Disney's 
metropolis of nostalgia, fan- 
tasy and futurism ~ opens. 
The park was not ready for 
the public: food and drinks 
ran out, a women's high- 
heel shoe got stuck in the 
wet asphalt of Main Street 
USA, and the Mark Twain 
Steamboat nearly capsized 
from too many passengers. 

• On July 14, 1968, At- 
lanta Braves slugger Henry 
"Hank" Aaron hits the 500th 
home run of his career in a 
4-2 win over the San Fran- 
cisco Giants. Aaron retired 
from baseball in 1976 with 
755 home runs and was 
later named to the Baseball 
Hall of Fame. 

• On July 13, 1985, at 

Wembley Stadium in Lon- 
don, Prince Charles and 
Princess Diana officially 
open Live Aid, a worldwide 
rock concert organized to 
raise money for the relief of 
famine-stricken Africans. 
The 1 6-hour "superconcert" 
was globally linked by sat- 
ellite to more than a billion 
viewers in 110 nations. 

O 2009 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



Home Buyer Education Series 
Offered To Cantonese Speakers 

Quincy Community Ac- 



tion Programs , Inc . , (QCAP) 
and Quincy Housing Au- 
thority ROSS Homeown- 
ership Program will offer 
a First-Time Homebuyers 
Workshop series in Canton- 
ese. 

The free workshop, con- 



Cantonese-speaking real 
estate professionals will 
cover topics ranging from 
mortgages to home insur- 
ance. 

Participants who com- 
plete the 10-hour program 
may be eligible for down- 
payment/closing cost assis- 



sisting of two sessions, will tance of up to $10,000 and 

be held Satiirday, July 25 for the soft second program, 

and Sunday, July 26 from Participants may also use 

9:30 a.m. to 1 :30 p.m. at 435 their certificate of comple- 

Palmer St. , Quincy. tion to obtain a low rate loan 

Attendance at both ses- through MassHousing or 

8i(His is required in order to MassHousing Partnership, 
lecdve a certificate. Fw m<KC information, or 

The workshop provides to register for the workshop, 

a comphrehensive review of call Pat Christopher at 617- 
tfae hoinebuying process. 



479-8181 ext. 319. 



State Treasurer Tim Cahill's not even officially a can- 
didate for governor next ycai and already some so- 
called experts are discounting his chances because he'd 
run as an independent. 

Counting Cahill out - if he's in - is 
a big mistake. 

Sure, leaving the Democratic Party 
and registering as an unenrolled/inde- 
pendent voter is a political gamble. Ca- 
hill switched affiliations last Wednes- 
day after deciding "the Democratic 
Party leadership no longer reflects my 
fiscal values or those of the working 
families in the Commonwealth." 

But his decision could pay off if the Quincy resident 
and former city councillor campaigns for governor next 
year. Cahill has said he will make a final decision about 
joining the gubernatorial sweepstakes in September. 

"It's a gamble but the party label means less and less 
and Tim has a record of going against the flow and being 
successful," is how one longtime political observer puts 
it. 

Cahill honed his maverick style while serving as a 
Quincy councillor at-large. He took what some perceived 
as politically unpopular positions at times, but always 
spoke his mind in a very candid and honest way. 

And that style certainly has resonated with city, coun- 
ty and state-wide voters. He was first elected a councillor 
in 1987 and was re-elected seven times. He also topped 
the ballot a number of times. For years he was rumored to 
have his eyes on the mayor's office but the timing never 
quite seemed right. 

In 1996, Cahill seized an opportunity to run for Nor- 
folk County treasurer and won a six-year term. While in 
that post, he sharpened his reputation as a fiscal conser- 
vative. 

You might say his first big political gamble came in 
2002 when he opted against running for re-election as 
county treasurer and instead made his first bid for state- 
wide office by seeking the state treasurer's post. 

It was an impressive debut. Cahill defeated three chal- 
lengers in the Democratic primary that year and topped 
Republican challenger Daniel Grabauskas in the final 
election to win the state treasurer's race. In his first state- 
wide run, Cahill polled over a million votes. He defeated 
Grabauskas by 191377 votes (1,040,281 to 848,904). 

So, rolling dice with his political future is nothing new 
for Cahill. 

But his decision to leave the Democratic Party and 
run as an independent for govemor will be debated and 
discussed well into the campaign if Cahill decides to run 
for the comer office on Beacon Hill. The race is already 
getting crowded: besides Gov. Deval Patrick, two Re- 
publicans have announced their candidacies, too: Christy 
Mihos and Charlie Baker. 

By leaving the Democratic Party, Cahill avoids a big 
obstacle, one that some believe he would have been hard- 
pressed to overcome: securing 15 percent of the Demo- 
cratic delegates at next year's State Convention which is 
required to qualify for the primary ballot. That's because 
Democratic Party leaders would have supported Gov. 
Patrick in his re-election bid. 

'The govemor controls the convention," one observer 
said. "And I think it would have been difficult for Tim to 
get the required 15 percent of the delegates at the conven- 
tion." 

So, running as an independent means Cahill would as- 
sure himself a spot on the general election ballot next 
November provided he does one thing: collect 10,000 
signatures from Massachusetts voters. And that's any 
voter registered from any party - including Democratic 
and Republican. 

(Candidates affiliated with a party, by the way, can 
collect signatures for state-wide office from voters within 
their own party and from the unenrolled - but not from 
other parties.) 

Cahill collected more than 5,000 signatures to qualify 
as a candidate for state treasurer. He would have approxi- 
mately six months to collect the 10,000 signatures he'd 



need for the govemor 's ballot. Those papers would be 
available Feb. 9, 2010 and be due Aug. 3 of next year. 

So the big political question is this: what kind of sup- 
port can Cahill, if he mns for govemor, gamer as a third 
party candidate? 

Obviously his defection from the Democratic party 
doesn't endear him to "traditional Democrats," one ob- 
server said. 

"Traditional Democrats don't like candidates who 
don't stay within the party. They tend to vote the straight 
party line." 

But the number of Democrats appears to be waning. In 
fact, there are more unenrolled registered voters in Mas- 
sachusetts than Democrats and Republicans - combined. 

The latest breakdown as of Oct. 15, 2008 shows there 
are 2,141,878 unenrolled voters in Massachusetts; that's 
about half of all registered voters. Registered Democrats 
are next with 1,559,464 (36.95 percent) followed by Re- 
publicans 490,259 (1 1 .62 percent). 

So, perhaps Cahill's potential candidacy would give 
new meaning to the political adage: vote the "man," not 
the "party." 

Money-wise, Cahill had $2,847,872 in his campaign 
account as of Dec. 31 last year, according to the most 
recent report filed Jan. 22. 

If you're a betting man, and know Tim Cahill, you'd 
have to think he's going to run for govemor next year. 
And go for broke. 

G 

TWO MORE POTENTL\L city council candidates 
have emerged. 

Jimmy Liang of 78 French Ave., a local restaurant 
owner, has pulled papers for city councillor at-large, ac- 
cording to the city's Election Department. Liang would 
be making his third bid for councillor at-large. He also 
ran in 2001 and 2003. 

Liang was also a candidate for Ward 6 councillor in 
2007, bowing to incumbent Brian McNamee. 

The three incumbent councillors at-large are seeking 
re-election: Joseph Finn, 15 Williams St., Michael Mc- 
Farland, 140 Sunmiit Ave. and John Keenan, 37 Hobo- 
mack Rd. 

□ 

IN WARD 6, Maureen Cunningham Glynn, a local 
Realtor, has taken out papers as a potential city council 
candidate. She would be challenging incumbent Ward 
6 Councillor Brian McNamee, 133 Commander Shea 
Blvd., who is seeking a third two-year term. 

Glynn, age 62, of 1001 Marina Dr., Squantum, would 
be making her first bid for elected office in Quincy. She is 
a member of the Quincy Conservation Commission. 

G 

AND TWO MORE potential School Committee can- 
didates have taken out nomination papers. 

They are: Steve Striffler,age 44, of 63 Huckins Ave., 
Squantum; and Emily Lebo, age 58, of 354 Highland 
Ave., Wollaston. 

Striffler is a civil engineer while Lebo is director of 
Career and Vocational Technical Education for the Bos- 
ton Public Schools. That brings the potential field for 
school committee up to 10 which means a preliminary 
election is likely on Sept. 22. The preliminary would pare 
down the number of school conmiittee candidates to six 
for the final election Nov. 3. 

THE COMMITTEE to Elect Margaret Laforest, a can- 
didate for Ward 1 councillor, will host a Clambake at the 
Cove tonight (Thursday) from 6 to 8 p.m. The event will 
be held at Laforest's home, 236 Rock Island Rd., Houghs 
Neck. Suggested donation of $30 per person or $50 per 
couple and tickets are available at the door. Call Wendy 
at 617-773-8271 for more information. 

SO FAR, the city's three other ward councillors do not 
have challengers. They are: Ward 2 Councillor Dan Ray- 
mond!, 88 Elm St.; Ward 3 Councillor Kevin Coughlin, 
19 Small St., and Ward 5 Councillor Doug Gutro, 230 
Marlboro St. 



MHi 



Thursday, JnJy 16, 2009 Ttk9 Quix&cy Sun Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 



uarttes 




THIS IS A 1908 postcard view of the Granite Railway 
Quarry in West Quincy. First known as Pine Hill Ledge, 
this quarry was opened about 1830 as the second source 
of granite for the Bunker Hill monument. By the time 
it closed in the 1940's, it had gained wide recognition 
for its fine grade of dark Quincy granite. Some historic 
landmarks made from its granite include: Minot Ledge 
Lighthouse off the Cohasset coast; the base building of 



Boston's Custom House with its 28 fluted columns; and 
the facade of the Omni Parker House Hotel in Boston. 
After it closed it became a favorite, albeit dangerous, 
swimming hole for youngsters from near and far until 
it was filled with Big Dig dirt in 2001. Today, its still 
protruding granite ledges attract large numbers of rock 
climbing enthusiasts. To contact Tom Galvin, e-mail 
tmgalvin@verizon.net. 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Tips From The Mayor's Drug Task Force Program 



By BRIAN BUCKLEY 

Chairman, 
Mayor 's Drug Task Force 

Over the past year and 
half, the Mayor's Drug 
Task Force has worked to 
increase awareness of sub- 
stance abuse in the commu- 
nity. 

Over the next few months , 
you will see a 'Tips from the 
Task Force" column twice a 
month in this space. Advice 
for parents, information on 
the social liability law, drug 
facts, the role of the Court 
System in combating sub- 
stance abuse and many oth- 
er topics will be discussed. 
The Drug Task Force is here 
to help you. 

Through collaboration 
with the Quincy Police De- 



partment, local health orga- 
nizations, the Quincy Pub- 
lic Schools, social service 
agencies and private citi- 
zens, several new initiatives 
began to bring important in- 
formation to the community 
on the dangers of addiction. 

Mayor Koch and Police 
Chief Keenan were instru- 
mental in obtaining three 
drug dogs for the city, a new 
Drug Task Force website 
was launched, two sympo- 
siums were held, planning 
for increased education in 
the schools began and the 
groundwork was laid for ex- 
panding the Drug Unit. 

We will point you toward 
new programs taking place 
in the city and provide in- 



formation on where to go 
to seek more help in the 
event that a family member 
or friend has begun abusing 
drugs. 

Keep posted as this sec- 
tion is only a small piece in 
the Mayor's efforts to de- 
crease substance abuse in 
the City. 

Drug Task Force Mem- 
bers: 

Arouca, Kim 

Bellotti, Michael 

Buckley, Brian 

Carroll, Elizabeth 

Cerone, Debbie 

Connolly, Mike 

Coughlin, Dan Jr. 

Coughlin, James 

Curran, Kristin 

Dumas, Carol 



Draicchio, Michael 
Franceschini , John 
Freeman, Dale 
Giordani , Sharon 
Glennon, Kevin 
Glynn, Patrick 
Hawker, Father Jim 
Keating, Bill 
Keough, Arthur 
LaFrance, Robyn 
Mazak, Linda 
Mazza, Kevin M. 
McDonough, Richard 
Mulvey, Kevin 
Powell, Janet 
Quigley, James 
Rothman, Jo 
Spataro, Patricia 
Sullivan, Sandy 
Tarabelli.Ken 
Tenaglia, Maura 
Weber, Brian 
Wines, Jamie 



Register Of Deeds To Speak At Kennedy Senior Center 



Norfolk County Reg- 
ister of Deeds William P. 
O'Donnell will speak at the 
Kennedy Center, Quincy 
Council on Aging, 440 East 
Squantum St., North Quin- 
cy, on Thursday, Aug. 20 at 
1 p.m. 

The short speaking pro- 
gram will touch on the his- 
torical nature of the Registry 
and the Register's efforts to 
modemize and computerize 
the vast number of Norfolk 
County real estate records. 

O'Donnell will also will 
be available to answer indi- 
vidual questions. 

Members of the Regis- 
ter's staff will assist in pro- 
viding information about the 
Massachusetts Homestead 
Act and have an internet 
computer and printer that 
can be used to demonstrate 
the Registry's internet web- 
site, confirm the status of a 
mortease discharge, or print 



out a copy of a deed. No ap- for those who may have dif- stead Declaration forms, and 



poimment is necessary. 

This program is a com- 
munity outreach program 
sponsored by Register 
O'Donnell to help inform 
senior citizens of the ser- 
vices the Registry offers 
and to make it convenient 



ficulty traveling to the Reg- 
istry building in Dedham. 
Although the Register and 
members of his staff cannot 
provide legal advice, they 
can provide answers to ba- 
sic questions, give general 
information, provide Home- 



assist in showing residents 
how the free public access 
computers work. 

The Registry of Deeds, 
located at 649 High St., 
Dedham, is the principal of- 
fice for real property in Nor- 
folk County. 



SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■ 



FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

[ ] 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
[ ] 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 




This Week 

1944 

65 Years Ago 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Education Expert 

Opens Probe Of 

Local Salaries 

By FRANK McCAULEY 

Dr. Alfred Dexter .Simpson, an educational expert hired 
by the City of Quincy to conduct an educational salary sur- 
vey of the Quincy School system. ^^^^^^^^^^^ 
met with the salary survey committee 
appointed by the school board, and 
laid the groundwork for the survey, 
which will probably extend through 
the rest of the year. 

Present at the conference were Dr. 
Paul Gossard. Superintendent of Schools. A Wendell Clark. 
Chairman, and other school committee members. 

Dr. Simpson said, "In effect, the fundamental pnnciple 
of any salary study must be concerned with the basic im- 
provement of the education of boys and girls and how the 
salary arrived at, contributes to such improvement " 
ATTEMPT MADE ON LIFE OF HITLER 
The official German news agency, DNB announced that 
Adolf Hitler and 13 of his top military and naval collabora- 
tors were injured in an attempt of the Fuehrer's life w hen a 
bomb exploded during a conference at the Fuehrers head- 
quarters at Rustenburg, East Prussia. 

DNB listed Hitler's injunes as slight bums, bruises and 
a light concussion of the brain. Three of the conference at- 
tendees were wounded seriously and 10 others escaped with 
minor injuries. 

QUINCYISMS 
Pompeo Motors, 666 Southern Artery, Quincy, asked car 
owners to: "Bring us your smooth tires and our expenenced 
workmen will do the rest. They know how to give your 
old tires a new lease on life!" (Editor's note: this process 
is called recapping)... The Kruger Brewing Company an- 
nounced that its beer "is Extra Filtered for Fnendly Flavor. 
Smooth and Mellow". . . The Montclair Playground baseball 
team was scheduled to play its first game against O'Neil 
Playground. Starting players for Montclair included Bill 
Reidy, Eddie McCauley and Joe McConville.. The Al- 
hambra Theater, Hancock St., Quincy Center, was featuring 
Humphrey Bogart and Michele Morgan in "Passage to Mar- 
seilles". . . Sgt. Norman Lacy, son of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Lacy, 36 South Walnut St., Quincy Point, a radio engineer 
aboard a B-24 Liberator, was awarded the Air Medal and 
two Oak Leaf clusters for air missions over enemy tem- 
tory... 1" Lt. Nicholas A. Pepe, of 16 Baxter St.. Quincy 
Point, completed eight months of service overseas in the 
European war zone. A navigator on a B- 17 Flying Fortress. 
Lt. Pepe completed 30 combat missions. He received the Air 
Medal with three Oak Leaf clusters and the Distinguished 
Flying Cross. . . Darrell T. Roberts, Jr., was undergoing re- 
cruit training at the US Naval Training Center, Great Lakes. 
111... Marine Cpl. William Hokkonen, 27 South Junior 
Terrace, South Quincy, blasted out of a tree of Saipan in the 
Mariana Islands by Japanese shell fire, escaped with only a 
severe shaking... Officer John J. (Jack) Irwin, longtime 
Quincy police officer, died "Patrolman Jack Irwin was one 
of most faithful and conscientious officers," said Quincy 
Police Chief John J. Avery. . . The Quincy Market, Chest- 
nut St., Quincy, was offering a "Thursday Special- A Full 
Course Turkey Dinner for 65 cents"... Sgt. Peter J. CoUi- 
gan, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. CoUigan, 348 Hancock 
St., returned to Camp Pickett, Virginia after a furlough of 
17 days. . . The Houghs Neck Boys Club held an oj)en meet- 
ing at the Lyceum Hall on Manet Avenue. Five new boys 
were initiated as members. They included: Walter Berg- 
man, George Bythrow, Robert Stockdale, James Welch 
and Paul Phelan. Charles Farrell conducted the initiation. 
President Charles Squatrito presided... The Rendezvous 
Restaurant, 853 Hancock St., was offering "Fried Chicken 
Dinner for only $ 1 , Only on Wednesday and Thursday, July 
19-20"... George A. Powell, Jr., Seaman, Second Class, 
U S . Navy, son of Mr. and Mrs . G . A . Powell , 1 68 Stoughton 
St., Houghs Neck, had been assigned to Yeoman School at 
the Naval Training Center in Rhode Island, for a 17-week 
training course... The Shipyard Army-Navy Store, 150 East 
Howard St., Quincy Point, was offering "Chino Pants for 
$2.19." 

KEEPING UP WITH THE RED SOX 
The Boston Red Sox were in third-place in the eight- 
team American League with a 43-40 record, four games 
behind the league-leading St. Louis Browns. (Editor's note: 
the Browns won the pennant but lost the World Series in six 
games to the St. Louis Cardinals.) 



Page 6 Tlie Qinincy Swa Thursday, July 16, 2009 



Arts & Ertertairmert 



Corporate Park Lobby And Cafeteria, 500 Victory Rd. 

14th Annual Arts Affair 
At Marina Bay Aug. 1-2 



ENC To Sponsor 

SoulFest 2009 

At Gunstock Resort 



The 14th annual Arts Af- 
fair at Marina Bay will be 
held Saturday, Aug. 1 and 
Sunday, Aug. 2 at Marina 
Bay Corporate Park, 500 
Victory Rd.,Quincy. 

Hours will be Saturday, 
Aug. 1 from 10 a.m. to 8 
p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 2 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

For the 14th year, artists 
will exhibit their work at 
the prestigious Arts Affair 
at Marina Bay. Visitors will 
enjoy the exhibition in com- 
fort as the event has moved 
indoors to the Corporate 
Park building, filling the 
cafeteria, lobby and outdoor 
spaces with works of art, 
sculpture and photography. 
The beauty of Boston Har- 
bor just steps away. 

Works exhibited will rep- 
resent 14 Local Art Associa- 
tions including: Braintree, 
Brockton CO A, Canton, 
Hull Artists Studio Con- 
nection, Hyde Park, Inde- 
pendent So. Shore Artist's 
Circle (formerly Brockton 




ARTIST DAN MCCOLE, South Boston was awarded the Wil- 
liam E. Beyer Award of Excellence for his painting entitled 
"Marina Bay" presented by a delighted Marilyn Reisberg of 
the Quincy Art Association at last year's annual *'Arts Affair" 
at Marina Bay. This year's event will be held . . . 



Artist's Circle), South Shore 
Art Center, Milton Art Mu- 
seum, Needham, Norwood, 
Quincy, South Boston, West 
Roxbury, and Weymouth. 

Professional judges will 
award ribbons in the follow- 
ing six categories: Oil and 
Acrylics, Watercolor, Mixed 
Media, Drawing, Sculpture 
and Photography. Ribbons 
will also be awarded for 
"Best of Show", and the 
"William E. Beyer Award of 
Excellence." 

Judging is Saturdayfrom 
10 a.m. to noon, followed 
by the Awards Ceremony at 
2 p.m. in the Corporate Park 
Cafeteria. 

Free parking and free 
admission, this 2-day event 
is a family favorite. An esti- 
mated 7,000 people are ex- 
pected to turn out this year. 

Weather permitting there 
are outdoor art demonstra- 
tions planned throughout 
the week-end. 

For more information 
please visit our website, 
www.artsaffair.org 



Eastern Nazarene Col- 
lege will be represented at 
the region's largest Chris- 
tian music festival, as the 
Quincy-based Christian lib- 
eral arts college sponsors 
SoulFest 2009. 

The four-day music fes- 
tival, to be held July 29 
through Aug. 1 at Gun- 
stock Mountain Resort in 
Guilford, N.H., will feature 
inspiring performances by 
more than 100 Christian art- 
ists and guest speakers from 
around the globe. Among 
those scheduled to perform 
are popular Christian mu- 
sic groups Casting Crowns, 
Third Day, Skillet and the 
Newsboys. 

In addition to serving as 
a ministry partner and co- 
sponsor of the event's main 
Revival Stage, ENC will 
also have a featured speaker 
on the program, the Rev. 
Lora Wooster addresses 
the topic of "Joumey To- 
wards Justice." Wooster is 
a co-founder of ENC's Mi- 



cro Enterprise Fund, which 
works with the Church of 
the Nazarene in Nicaragua 
to provide small loans to 
help local residents start or 
expand a business in Central 
America's poorest nation. 

"Eastern Nazarene is 
proud to be a sponsor of 
SoulFest 2009," said Presi- 
dent Corlis McGee, who 
noted ENC has sponsored 
the event for eight of the 
past 10 years. 

"In addition to presenting 
a wide variety of contempo- 
rary Christian music groups, 
SoulFest offers tangible op- 
portunities for attendees to 
get involved in social jus- 
tice issues, from helping 
the poor to supporting local 
food banks. In doing so," 
McGee said, "SoulFest res- 
onates with ENC's mission 
of producing the caring, 
committed Christian leaders 
of tomorrow." 

For tickets or more infor- 
mation, call 978-346-4577. 



Gerald Grindley Memorial Fund Trip to McCoy Stadium July 25 



Temple Shalom Sponsoring 
Canoe Trip Saturday 



The Gerald Grindlay 
Memorial Fund is planning 
its seventh armual trip to 
see the Pawtucket Red Sox 
at McCoy Stadium in Paw- 
tucket, R.I. 

This year's trip will be 
held Saturday, July 25 to see 
the PawSox take on the Co- 



lumbus Clippers. 

Tickets are $33 and in- 
clude game admission and 
an all-you-can-eat BBQ. 
The BBQ runs from 4 to 6 
p.m. and the game is sched- 
uled to start at 6:05 p.m. 

In addition, at this game, 
the PawSox are giving away 



Jon Lester Bobbleheads to 
kids 14 and under. 

AH proceeds will benefit 
the Gerald Grindlay Memo- 
rial Fund. 

Over the past few years, 
the proceeds have been used 
to donate tickets to the Big 
Brothers Association for 
their members to attend 



the game and to fund book 
awards for local students en- 
tering private high schools. 
Those interested in at- 
tending the game July 25 or 
for more information about 
the memorial fund should 
call Michael Grindlay at 
617-823-3047 or Catherine 
Grindlay at 617-293-8417. 



'Too Good to Pass Up!" - hfddenboston.com 

Cr o n in ^ Si 



TWIN LOBSTER SPECIAL 

with potato, corn & drawn butter 
$ ^ Q95 While they last (dlne-in only) 

Support your local fishermen 
all lobsters bought from quincy boats! 



FISHERMAN'S PLATTER 

95 



Golden fried scrod, whole clams 
and scallops, fresh daily form 
the Boston Fish Pier. 



$14 



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SIRLOIN TIPS (OR TURKEY TIPS) 

Our Famous Best Seller, Still Just... MM 

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H Hotdogs during every Red Sox game 



Need Time to Yourself? 



Retreat at 
Atria Marina Place offers: 

• Short-term assisted living 

• Wellness staff on call 24 hours 

every day, should an emergency arise 

• The same amenities as a full-time 

resident, including events, nutritious 

meals and scheduled transportation 



Rabbi Fred "Oar Cha- 
dash" Benjamin of Temple 
Shalom of Milton will lead 
a guided Moonlight Ca- 
noe and Kayak Trip on the 
Charles River Saturday, July 
18 from 9:15 to 10:55 p.m., 
as part of a Jewish activity 
and recreation program this 
summer called "Bikes and 
Chai-kes." 



Maris 



I 



Monday Night 
Blues Jam 

w/Ricky King Russell 
& The Double D's 



The program is mostly 
aimed at families with young 
children, and is supported 
by a grant from Combined 
Jewish Philanthropies. 

This particular event is 
for adults only and includes 
a Havdallah service and 
nosh. 

The trip departs from 
Charles River Canoe and 
Kayak in Newton, with a 
maximum of 40 people. 

For information about 
cost, to register and for 
more information, call 617- 
698-3394. 



The All New 



Tuesday I school o/music 




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Four Seaport Drive 

North Quincy, Massachusetts 

617.770.3264 

umm^.atriamarinaplace . ccmn, 



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Thursday, July 16, 2009 The Quincy Sun Page 7 




MARNIE DUNN enjoys working in her '^lant collector's" garden with lavender and her prize CLAIRE CURRIER is always busy, amid her cinquefoil and rose campion, in her hillside gar- 
purple malva. den near Braintree dam. 

Wollaston Garden Club Members Enjoy Annual Garden Tour 



The Wollaston Garden 
Club, member of the Na- 
tional Garden Club, Inc., 
and Garden Club Federation 
of Massachusetts founded in 
1927, recently had their 5th 
annual Members Garden 
Tour & Progressive Dinner 
- and a fun fest it was. 

With the rain now be- 
coming commonplace, one 
began wondering if there 
was ever such a thing as 
sunshine or would the Club 
be able to carry on with 
their plans. But - 'that lucky 



old sun' came shining on 
through and gave folks a 
spectacular day for the tour. 
The food was nothing 
less than superb; and each 
setting for the tour had its 
beautifully unique and very 
different garden. A debt 
of gratitude was extended 
to Claire Currier, Mamie 
Dunn, Rebecca Dinsmore 
and Kathleen Frost for offer- 
ing up their gardens. It takes 
a lot of planning and a lot 
of difficult work to prepare 
for such an event in order to 



pull it off successfully. 

Susan Lynch, Joan Don- 
ovan, Kathy Meade, Marcia 
Smith and Nancy Nelson 
were the event's hostesses, 
and each person on their 
committee placed a sub- 
stantial amount of time and 
thought into providing a 
cornucopia of eye-appealing 
and delicious food for each 
of the courses. 

The tour began by en- 
joying tasty hors'duerves, 
while the members took 
pleasure from the serenity of 



Germantown Community Summer Kick Off 



The Germantown Neigh- 
borhood Center's Armual 
Community Appreciation 
Day will have a cookout for 
its Summer Kick Off today 
(Thursday) from noon to 3 
p.m. 

The event, which will 
be held at the center at 366 
Palmer St. will feature raf- 
fles, hamburgers, face paint- 
ing, hot dogs, drinks, music 
and dancing. 

In addition to the Ger- 
mantown Center, the event 
is sponsored by the Quincy 



Public Schools Summer 
Food Program, Community 
Development Block Grant, 
South Shore YMCA, Dis- 
trict Attorney William Keat- 
ing's Office, Quincy Com- 



munity Police, Snug Harbor 
School, Ward 1 Councillor 
Leo Kelly, Quincy Citizen's 
Police Academy, Quincy 
Housing Authority, and the 
Quincy Parks Department. 



Lauren DiBona Receives Award 



Lauren DiBona of Quin- 
cy, a student at Archbishop 
Williams High School, was 
named the 2009 recipient of 
the Saint Michael's College 
Scholarship and Service 
Book Award. 

The award recognizes 



students who demonstrate 
a commitment to volunteer- 
ism and leadership trough 
community service. 

Lauren is the daughter of 
Peter and Kim DiBona of 
Quincy. 



Claire Currier's garden and 
set around the patio. Across 
from the garden you find a 
row of manicured hedge that 
separates the patio garden 
from an impressive field of 
blackberries that would in 
fact earn add-on status at the 
Quincy Farmers' Market. 

Later, the tour moved on 
to Mamie Dunn's for the 
salad. The members had a 
wide selection of salads to 
choose from, each one on 
its own was five star. Atop 
the wooden archway you 
find deep purple clematis as 
you enter the garden. Rock 
gardens are located around 
the area; flowers are flanked 
along the driveway, and a 
neat vegetable garden is set 
next to the house. Every- 
thing in the garden was neat 
and so pleasing to the eye. 

The main course was 
had at the Dorothy Quincy 
House. A variety of mouth 



watering food was served. 
Rebecca Dinsmore volun- 
teers much of her time to 
landscaping for the Dorothy 
Quincy House, and does a 
great job. The flowenng 
shrubs and trees are set 
throughout the sprawling 
lawn, while a select area in 
the garden is positioned with 
flowers that are encircled in 
a nng of boxwood and are 
again repeated within dif- 
ferent ring designs of box- 
wood. It is in fact a stnkmg 



piece of garden art. 

The tour ends with de- 
licious desserts served at 
Kathleen Frost's garden. 
The garden was filled with 
hydrangeas, white flowers, 
and a soothing use of green 
textured grasses and shrubs. 
Her waterfront home of- 
fered a stnking view of the 
Boston skyline. It made the 
whole scene exceptionally 
picture perfect. Summing it 
up - a good time was had by 
all. 



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We now have later hours 
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Function Halls Available for all your Special Needs... 

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FLORISTS 



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FUNCTION HALL 



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Page 8 Tlie Qulnoy Sun Thursday. July 16. 2009 




For Holding Facility At Former Shipyard Building 

Conservation Commission 
Considering Aquarium Request 



HANCOCK STREET from Granite to School Streets will become a pedestrian mall with shop- 
pers during the three-day Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival which opens today (Thursday). 
Hours will be Thursday and Friday from 10 to 8 pjn. and Saturday from 10 a jn. to 5 pan. 

Maralin Manning Photo 

Bethany Youth Group Booth At Sidewalk Sale 



Bethany Congregation- 
al Church, 18 Spear St., 
Quincy, will have a booth at 
Quincy 's Annual "Sidewalk 
Sale." 

Bethany's Youth Group 
will be selling refreshments 



and items to support their 
various activities. The Out- 
reach Ministry Commit- 
tee will be representing the 
Interfaith Social Services' 
Food Pantry; people are 
asked to donate a food item 



or cash donation for the 
Pantry. Other groups will 
also be represented. 

Visit www.quincybeth- 
anychurch .org for additional 
information. 



.Sf^'kh, 




JEWELERS 

1415 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 

(617) 471-4824 

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Conservation Commis- 
sioners scheduled a first 
hearing Wednesday to con- 
sider recent requests for per- 
mits from the New England 
Aquarium. The meeting will 
be held after The Quincy 
Sun deadline. 

Aquarium directors hope 
to establish a holding facil- 
ity for fish and aquatic crea- 
tures in a South Street build- 
ing at the former Fore River 
Shipyard. Cashman Compa- 
nies owns the building. 

"We've been looking for 
an offsite (locafion)," said 
Tony LaCasse, spokesman 
for the non-profit New Eng- 
land Aquarium, noting the 
Fore River location offers 
access to salt water. 

Commissioners must ap- 
prove two permits: the first 
would allow the aquarium 
to pump salt water from the 
harbor into the proposed 
tanks which have capacities 
of 30,000 gallons and, the 



second permit would allow 
a trench pipe along the pier 
line for the watp'' transfer. 

"It would give us greater 
capacity," said Tony LaC- 
asse, spokesman for the 
aquarium who described the 
need for an offsite holding 
facility for fish and aquatic 
animals before and after 
exhibits and an area for the 
marine animal rescue team. 

LaCasse said the aquar- 
ium offers its 1.3 million 
annual visitors access to 
750 different aquatic spe- 
cies. The aquarium often, 
acquires new fish and ani- 
mals which "must be held in 
quarantine for 30 days." 

The tanks would be built 
of new concrete with fiber- 
glass shields. 

While the public is of- 
ten aware that aquarium 
staff rescue harbor porp>oise 
and seals, they also work to 
protect other animals which 
must be protected until they 



are released. 

LaCasse said that, each 
year, the aquarium rescues 
between 25 to 150 stranded 
Kemp's ridley sea turtles 
left behind during the Fall 
migration south and, to date, 
have rescued over 500 of the 
endangered species. 

The young turtles, rang- 
ing from three to four 
months old to five years of 
age, are often suffering from 
pneumonia or hypothermia 
and are treated by aquarium 
staff and then shipped south 
for release. 

LaCasse expects the local 
and federal review of plans 
to take several months. The 
facility will not be open to 
the public. 

While the 40-year-old 
New England Aquarium is a 
non-profit organization, the 
facility would be subject to 
real estate taxes as a leased 
structure. 



Free Movie *Under The Stars' July 22 



The Quincy Beaches and 
Coastal Commission and 
Mayor Thomas Koch will 
sponsor a free "Movie Un- 
der the Stars" Wednesday, 
July 22 at Mound Street 
Beach in Quincy Point. 

The movie that will be 



shown on July 22 is "Mr. 
Magorium's Wonder Empo- 
rium," starring Dustin Hoff- 
man, Natalie Portman and 
Jason Bateman. It is a mov- 
ie about a magic toy store 
where everything comes to 
life-including the store it- 



Breanne Therrien Quinnipiac Graduate 

Breanne M. Therrien arts in teaching degree from 
of North Quincy, recently Quinnipiac University, New 
graduated with a master's of York. 



self. 

The movie will begin at 
dusk and a bingo game will 
be held at 6:30 p.m. Patrons 
may purchase refreshments 
and snacks or may bring 
their own. Those attend- 
ing are also invited to bring 
along a blanket or chair, and 
flashlight. 

For additional informa- 
tion, call Leo Kelly, Chair- 
man, at 617-773-1534. 




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Thursday, July 16, 2009 Tlie Qiiinc7 Sim Page 9 



Three-Day Event Starts Today 



39th Annual Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival 



The 39"' annual Quincy 
Center wSidewalk Festival 
will begin today (Thursday) 
and continue Friday, July 17 
and Saturday, July 18. 

Hancock Street from 
Granite Street to School 
Street will be closed to 
vehicular traffic for this 
three-day event to allow lo- 
cal vendors and crafters the 
opportunity to display their 
wares in an outdoor atmo- 
sphere. 

Festival hours are today 
and Friday from 10 a.m. to 
8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Organizers says this 
year's event may be the big- 
gest and best festival but it 
may also be the last in this 
particular format since plans 
are in the works to redevel- 
op Quincy Center. 

Each year, the Quincy 
Business Association pres- 
ents this summer event; the 
festival has become a lo- 
cal summer tradition. The 
festival will feature family 
event. 

Tonight, a popular local 
group, Part Time Lovers 
Band, sponsored by South 
Coastal Bank, will make a 
return appearance from 5 to 
7 p.m. 

Friday's program is a 




MINIATURE CAROUSEL rider Nicholas Ferrera and his 
mother Jenna enjoy last year's Quincy Center Sidewalk Festi- 
val. This year's event opens today (Thursday). 

Maralin Manning Photo 



fun-filled performing group 
that will have children and 
grown-ups alike shaking, 
rattling and beating with the 
drums and shakers of the 
Tony Fonesca Drummers 



p.m. Friday. 

Saturday afternoon will 
feature the musical offer- 
ings of the South Bay Band, 
sponsored by the Bank of 
Canton and Stop & Shop 



Troupe, sponsored by the Companies. The band con- 

Quincy Rehabilitation and sists of 45 talented vol- 

Nursing Center. The troupe unteer musicians, ranging 

will perform from 5 to 7 from high school students to 



senior citizens from various 
occupations with business- 
men, teachers, homemakers 
and physicians among this 
group of enthusiastic per- 
formers. 

The band will perform a 
variety of selections from 
standard march favorites of 
John Philip Souza to jazz 
medleys by Harry James 
and others. Each year the 
group, because of the gener- 
ous donation of their talent 
and time at various loca- 
tions, has been able to give 



multiple scholarships to tal 
ented high school seniors all 
around the South Shore. 

Saturday will also feature 
an added attraction: Woods 
Auto School will sponsor 
an Antique and Classic Car 
Show, complete with a tro- 
phy award for the best in 
show. 

Also on Ihursday and 
Friday from noon to 4 p.m., 
music by Gerri De Luca. 
sponsored b\ Sherman Re- 
alty, will provide lively en- 
tertainment for the "lunch 



7 p.m. during the 3Vth annual 

bunch" and casual shop- 
pers . 

"Each \ear this event, 
hosted by the Quinc\ Busi- 
ness Association, in co- 
operation with the office 
of Mavor Thomas Koch, 
prove'^ to be a special treat 
for Quincy residents and 
friends in neighboring com- 
munities," said .Maralin 
.Manning, executive director 
oftheQBA 

For more information, 
call the QBA office at 617- 
471-3232. 



39«AonoalOaiDcyCeiiterSIDEWALK FESTIUf^L 

ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE 



THURSDAY, PULV 16, ^009 lOAIfl-SPifl 



OPENING CEREMONIES 1 0AM, Mayor Thomas Koch Officiates 

: 12:00pm - 4:00pm Music by 6ERRI PE Lim Sponsored by Sherman Realty 

: 5:30pm - 7:30pm live Music by PART TIME lOVirS BAND Sponsored by South Coastal Bank 



FRIDAY, PULV 17, 2009 lOAIfl-SPIfl 



• 1 1 :00am - 4:00pm Music by GERRI PE LUQi Sponsored by Sherman Realty 

: 5:30pm - 7:30pm Music by THE TONY FONESCA PRUMMERS ''lively. Upbeat and Lots of Fun' 

Rehab & Nursing Center 



SATURDAY, PULY IS, ^009 lOAIfl-SPIfl 



: 8:00iuw - 5:00pm ANTIQUE & CLASSIC CAR SHOW Best of Show Trophy to be Awarded 

; Sponsored by Woods Auto School 

• 

: 12N00N - 2:00pm THE SOUTH SHORE BAY BAND 

I Sponsored by Bank of Canton and Stop & Shop Companies 

CRAFHR AND VENDOR BOOTHS A OUTDOOR DINING OPPORTUNITIES 



Page 10 Tbe Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2009 




Free Seminar, Clinic 
On Pneumococcal Disease 



ON HAND TO cut the ribbon marking the grand opening of The View Restaurant and Tavern, 
located at Presidents Golf Course were (from left to right): Barrett Fraser, Maralin Manning of 
the Quincy Business Association; Don Uvanitte, Eastern Insurance; Ed Keohane, chairman of 
Quincy 2000; Don Small, PGA golf pro; Bill Fraser, general manager of The View; Chris Carr, 
owner of The View; Mark Carey, Discover Quincy; Mayor Thomas P. Koch; Michael Covais, 
Covais Law Offices; Jim Fitzroy, director of Presidents Golf Course; Jared Carr and Dean 
Rizzo, Quincy 2000. (Photo courtesy of Donna Mavromates - Quincy 2000) 

The View Restaurant And Tavern 
Celebrates Grand Opening 



Owner Chris Carr re- 
cently celebrated the grand 
opening of his restaurant, 
The View Restaurant and 
Tavern, located at Presi- 
dents Golf Course, 357 West 
Squantum St., Quincy. 

On hand to celebrate were 
Mayor Thomas P. Koch, 
Quincy 2000 Collaborative 
Chairman Ed Keohane of 
Keohane Funeral Homes, 
Quincy 2000 Collaborative 
Executive Director Dean 
Rizzo, Discover Quincy Ex- 
ecutive Mark Carey, Quincy 
Business Association Ex- 
ecutive Director Maralin 
Manning, fellow business 
owners, family and friends. 

Carr's extensive back- 
ground in the restaurant 



and event plaiming busi- 
ness began after he gradu- 
ated from the Culinary Insti- 
tute of America (C.I.A.) in 
Hyde Park, New York. He 
founded the event planning 
business Boston Butler Inc. 
in 1992 and this entrepre- 
neurial spirit led him to take 
on the role of renovating the 
restaurant that had previ- 
ously existed at President's 
Golf Course. 

"My sons and I play golf 
here quite often and have 
always been amazed by the 
view and the atmosphere 
here. 1 quickly realized that 
there was a huge potential to 
bring fresh quality food at a 
reasonable price to not only 
the golfers but also to the 



JO//V (;5, 



Hundreds of People ^ 
Dozens of Restaurants 

ONE REASON: 

NobodV should be homeless 



general public," said Carr. 

"Many people have the 
misperception that only 
golfers can enjoy the ameni- 
ties here. Everyone is wel- 
come to come and experi- 
ence the indoor and outdoor 
dining and admire the beau- 
tiful grounds surrounding 
the restaurant." 

Carr said he is apprecia- 
tive of the support that he's 
received from the Norfolk 
County Commissioners 
(Presidents Golf Course is 
owned and operated by the 
County of Norfolk), as well 
as the City of Quincy and 
the town of Milton. 

The View currently has 
29 employees, both full and 
part-time. "It feels great to 
be hiring in this economy," 
said Carr. 

The View Restaurant 
and Tavern is open daily 
starting at 6:30 a.m. serving 
breakfast, lunch, and din- 
ner, along with a full liquor 
complement. 

The View is also avail- 
able for functions. 

Free parking available. 
Call (617) 770-2500. 



^ Alii 

bSmm far 





Just when you though we 
were through with the usual 
ills for the season, along 
comes another with an un- 
pronouncable name. 

The Heath Department 
has disclosed pneumococcal 
disease, especial pneumo- 
coccal pneumonia, is now 
the leading cause of vaccine 
preventable deaths in the 
United States. 

The Department, in con- 
junction with the Council on 
Aging, will offer a seminar 

'Okie's Funraiser' 

Friday At 

Marina Bay 

The Water Club Marina 
Bay will host the third an- 
nual "Okie's Funraiser" 
Friday, July 17 from 5 to 9 
p.m. There will be refresh- 
ments, raffles and music. 

Donations of $20 may be 
made at the door. Proceeds 
in John O'Connell's memo- 
ry will benefit North Quincy 
High School graduates and 
contribute to the develop- 
ment of an anti-violence 
education video. 

O'Connell, a North 
Quincy graduate himself, 
died as the result of a violent 
act while attending Westfield 
State College. 

Jing Huang 
Earns PhD 

Jing Huang of Quincy 
has graduated with a doc- 
tor of philosophy degree in 
English from the Missouri 
University of Science and 
Technology at Rolla, Mo. 

The school was formerly 
known as the University of 
Missouri at Rolla. 

Huang, Lees Are 
Wentworth Grads 

Stanley Huang and 
Russell Lees, both of 
Quincy, were among the 
144 students who recently 
graduated from Wentworth 
Institute of Technology in 
Boston. 



.Goodbye 



TICKETS: $100 

RAFFLE: Enter the raffle to win a trip for 
two to St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. 
Fly roundtrip and stay 7 days/6 nights at 
the Frenchman's Reef and Morning Star 
Marriott Beach Resort. $20 each or 3 for $50 

Purchase your ticket or raffle tickets 
today at www.fatherbillsmainspring.org 
or call 617-376-2255 x231. 




^S\ 



1^ Annuitl 

, <;?\ EQO) 

nUwr Bills k MUnSfrtH F £ ^ T 

acAOcnoN 



■•■aa, tHW«ia ai NaMfiats 



Wave 

to 

Your 

Old 

Home! 

Let me sell it! 

Sam 
Rounseville 

617-875-1776 

Number One 
year after year! 

Abigail Adams 

jissam76@aol.com 




on the pneumococcal vac- 
cine (PPSV23) and tetanus/ 
diphtheria vaccine (Td) 
Wednesday, July 22, from 1 
to 3 p.m. 

A free clinic will offer 
pneumoccal and tetanus/ 
diphtheria vaccines to those 
65 and older Thursday, Aug. 
6 from 1 to 3 p.m. 

Both events will take 
place in the main classroom 
of the Council on Aging at 
the Kennedy Center. 440 
East Squantum St. North 
Quincy. 



To be eligible for the free 
vaccine you must be over 
the age of 65. Those be- 
tween the ages of 18 and 65 
with specific medical condi- 
tions require a note from a 
physician. 

Only the first of the 
pneumoccal series will be 
offered, boosters will not be 
given. 

Any questions about the 
offered vaccines or eligi- 
bility, contact the Quincy 
Health Department at 617- 
376-1285 or 6 17-376- 1286. 



^ QUINCY ANIMAL SHELTER ^ 

56 Broad Street, Quincy • 6 1 7-376- 1 349 
quinc/animalshelterorg 

IN-SHELTER ADOPTION HOURS 

TUESDAY and THURSDAYS 6:00 to 8:00 pm 

SATURDAYS 1 am -4 pm 

Adoption fees include initial vaccinations 

and Spay/Neuter as needed. 1 00% volunteer run, 

new volunteers alv^ys needed. 

FOR LOST or FOUND ANIMALS call 
ANIMAL CONTROL at 6 1 7-376- 1 364. 

WE HAVE LOTS OF 
KITTENS NEEDING GOOD HOMES! 

Foster Parents/Homes Urgently Needed 
AVAnABF.FCATS 
CESSIElI y.o. tabby. Playful. 
SOUNDER: 5 y.o., loves attention/chatty. 
ABBY: y otmg gray & white tabby. 
GINGERSNAP; 1 y.o. pretty tabby. 
SARA & CAKSAR: 17 y.o., want to stay to- 
gether. 

MOONBEAM: 1 y.o. black. Lx)ves attention. 
PIPSEY: male, black and white. 
MISS PRTSS; swp.et gray and white tabby. 
JASMINE: female, orange tabby. 
MIA: R y.o., all white. Wants her own home. 



Quincy Animal Shelter Pet of the Week 



KIPS: I'm a sweet, play- 
ful, 10-month who loves 
to run and jump! I need a 
patient family to help so- 
cialize me and teach me 
some basic obedience. 
I can get really scared 
sometimes - in storms 
and in the dark. I would 
rather live with older kids 
and would love a canine 



"s^ 



or feline companion. 




J 



!!!Now Open!!! 




Quarrv Hills 
Animal Hosj^lfal 

Judle A PaulauskI DVM 

406 Willard Street 
Quincy MA 02169 

617-934-4892 

M-W-F 7:30 am - 5:00 pm 
T-TH 7:30 am - 7:00 pm / Sat 8 am - 1 pm 

Your pet's health and happiness are our 01 priority! 



mm 



Thursday, July 16, 2009 Tlie Quincy Stin Page II 




Quincy Credit Union 
Opens Weymouth Branch 



QLINCV'S FlRSr SWIM area markfrs have been instalieu ai Back Beach in Adam*> .Shore. 

Swim Buoys For Quincy 's Beaches 

our bodies consist of about 
60% water, buoyancy makes 
you feel perfectly balanced. 

Total Body Condition- 
ing: Swimming tones your 
upper and lower body and 
uses all the major muscle 
groups. 

Low Risk of Injury: 
There is a low risk for swim- 
ming injuries because no 
stress is placed on bones, 
joints or connective tissue. 

Low Impact Exercise: 
Swimming is an effective, 
life long, physical activity. 
Dunng pregnancy, as an 
elder or a person with dis- 
abilities, swimming can be 
safe. 

Improve Blood Pres- 
sure: Studies have shown 
a workout routine that in- 
cludes swimming can help 
reduce and possibly prevent 
high blood pressure lower- 
ing the risk for heart disease 
and stroke. 

It's FREE: Going to the 
neighborhood beach is free. 
There are many additional 
benefits to being m tune 
with the tides and being in 
salt water. 



Harbor Master Pat Mor- 
rissey and Quincy Beaches 
and Coastal Commission 
member Laura Innis recent- 
ly installed Quincy 's first 
swim area markers at Back 
Beach in Adams Shore. 

Funding was provided 
through the Blue Hills Com- 
munity Health Alliance, 
CHNA 20. Funds are made 
available to help support ef- 
forts to create Healthy Com- 
munities. 

With the clean-up of 
Boston Harbor and the ban 
on dumping put in place last 
year, Quincy 's 13 neighbor- 
hood beaches are clean and 
swimmable. Most of the 
neighborhood beaches pass 
the Health Department's 
clean water test 100% of the 
time. 

Innis said she wants 
Quincy residents to know 
the water is clean. 

"We are so fortunate 
to have 27 miles of clean 
coastline and an opportunity 
to get free physical activity 
without sitting in traffic," 
she said. 

A marker was also placed 
near Edgewater Beach to 



remind boaters and jet ski 
enthusiasts that there are 
people swimming. 

Innis said she will contin- 
ue to write grants and try to 
secure funding to purchase 
markers for Quincy's other 
beaches. 

'This initiative will help 
make our residents healthier 
and sustain the economic 
base of the city. Our people 
and our beaches are a great 
resource and swimming of- 
fers many great health ben- 
efits," she added. 

HEALTH BENEHTS 
OF SWIMMING 

The Perfect Exercise: 
Swimming is the perfect 
workout for your whole 
body, improving cardio- 
vascular health, muscle 
strength , endurance , posture , 
and flexibility. Your car- 
diovascular system benefits 
because swimming dis- 
tributes oxygen from head 
to toe without overworking 
the heart. 

Stress Reduction: Water 
is soothing. The moment 
you jump in you start to re- 
lax. Swimming forces you 
to breathe properly. Since 



Quincy Credit Union 
Board of Directors an- 
nounce the opening of their 
new branch location at 519 
Columbian Street in Wey- 
mouth. 

The 3,7(X) square feet 
building includes a Drive 
up Teller and AIM. Night 
Deposit Services and Self 
Service Coin Machme. The 
new location will offer ex- 
panded hours until 7 p.m on 
Thursday evenings. 

Helen Nelson will serve 
as Branch Manager and lead 
the Branch Service Team. 
Previously employed by 
Braintree Credit Union, 




HELEN NELSON 

Nelson brings over 10 years 
financial service experience 
to her new position 

QCU Members and resi- 
dents of the neighbonng 
communities are invited 



to stop by to see the new 
branch and take part in the 
Credit Union's many festiv- 
ities, which include weeklv 
drawmgs. QCU Gilt Bags. 
Refreshments and a chance 
to enter the grand prize 
drawing for a %f>()() Ameri- 
can Hxpressfe Gift Card. 

Quincy Credit I nion 
currently serves over 23. OCX) 
members. 

Credit Union .Member- 
ship is available to those 
who live or work in Norfolk 
and Plymouth Counties. 
Dorchester and any family 
member. 



Recycling Up 700 
Saves City $310 



Tons, 
,000 



Cont 'd From Page I 
regional contract with Capi- 
tol Waste Services. Inc. last 
year. With three cities to- 
gether at the bargaining ta- 
ble, officials secured a very 
favorable contract despite 
the economic climate and 
industry-wide cost increas- 
es, Koch said. 

The contract also includ- 
ed a provision that actually 
pays back the city for every 
ton that it recycles at a time 



when most communities are 
actually paying an average 
of $60 per ton to dispose 
of recyclable material, said 
John Sullivan, program 
manager for the Department 
of Public Works. 

The reduction in gar- 
bage produced by residents 
amounted to $206,000 in 
savings on trash collection, 
and the increase in recy- 
cling produced $104,000 in 
revenue, combining for the 



$3 10.000 in total savings. 

The new recycling 
program, called "single- 
stream." allows residents to 
place all recyclable material 
in a single container without 
sorting. Officials encourage 
residents to use one of their 
existing trash barrels for re- 
cyclables and affix a sticker 
distnbuted by the DPW on 
it to identify it as a recycling 
container. 



^Nutrition And Sleeping' At Kennedy Center 



Dr. Gabrielle Freedman 
will do a presentation on 
"Nutrition and Sleeping" 
Wednesday, Aug. 5 at 1 p.m. 
at the Kennedy Center, 440 



East Squantum St.. North 
Quincy. 

The presentation will 
include topics such as ex- 
ercise, how stress can af- 



fect your health, and proper 
sleeping techniques. 

To register for this pro- 
gram, call 617-376-1506. 



Free Moving Screening 
At Library July 23 



A free screening of the 
2008 movie "He's Just Not 
That Into You" starring Ben 
Affleck and Jennifer Aniston 
will be held Thursday, July 
23 at 7 p.m. at the Thomas 
Crane Public Library, 40 
Washington St., Qumcy. 

The movie, directed by 
Ken Kwapis, stars Affleck, 
Aniston, Drew Barrymore, 
Jennifer Connelly, Kevin 
Connolly, Bradley Cooper, 
Ginnifer Goodwin, Scarlett 



Johansson, Kris Kristoffer- 
son, and Justin Long. 

It is rated Pg-13 for sex- 
ual content and brief strong 
language. Running time 129 
minutes. 

For more informafion, 
call 617-376-1301. 



COPELAND PACKAGE STORE, INC. 

BEER,WINES & LIQUORS 




Dennis Carson 
273 Copeland St. 
TlwBast In Quincy, Ma 02 1 69 

%^W*» (617) 471-5418 •(617)472-7012 




Elks Friday Night 

Summer 
Meat 
Raffu 

Juiy 24 

Opens at 5pm 

IUmEAr7PM 

Foop Mehu Offerep 

Qaincy Lodge of Elks 

254 Quany Street 

Open to the Public 
21 years and older 



^' ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B^^^^^kS^^^ 




Rediscover your 

summer body 

at Fitness Unlimited. 






INTRODUCTORY OFFER 1 

8 weeks 1 
for $99 1 

First-time participants only. 1 


^^^^H^v What do women really want? 


Fitness V Unlimited 

EAST MILTON 

364 Granite Avenue 

617-698-0260 

www.fitnessunlimited.com 


• Personal Training • Cardio* Strength • Fiteenz • Group Cycle • Expert Weight Loss • Pilate 


s Reformer Studio • Child Care 



Page 12 Tbe Quinoy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2009 





■■mi mimmM» s^^i-sws* ■-■ w rmw^mi,w 's*** \S!'^» 



IB 



FIRE SAFETY 



by Captain Tom Lyons 

Fire Prevention Bureau 
QuUwy Fire I^^fwtmint 




New Plea, Same Issue 



MARTIN E. AIKENS of Houghs Neck, a business representative for Local 103 I^ Jl.W., was 
recently appointed to the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative Board of Directors by Gov. 
Deval Patrick. Above, Aikens is administered the director's oath by Arthur Tobin, clerk mag- 
istrate at Quincy District Court. Senior management from some of the Commonwealth's most 
prominent technology companies, and academic and research communities, are represented 
on MTC's Board of Directors. The Collaborative 's Board also includes the state's leading eco- 
nomic development officials. Its mission is to promote technology-sector growth through part- 
nerships among industry, universities and state government. 

Art-In-The-Park At Peace field 



Art-in-the-Park: Paint- 
ing Peace field will be held 
Saturday and Sunday, July 
18 and 19 on the grounds of 
the Old House at the Adams 
National Historical Park in 
Quincy. 

Artists and art lovers 



are invited to paint or pho- 
tograph the historic home 
and peaceful landscape that 
today comprises the Adams 
National Historical Park. 
The tranquil landscape and 
its historic buildings, gar- 
dens and grounds inspired 



We're Good, 

We're Honest, 

We're Eco 



Foreign & Domestic Cars & Trucks 

STOCK MUFFLERS 

or High Performance 

Huge inventory of 

exhaust, custom pipe 

bending, partial system 

repairs and superior 

specialized service 



MUFFLER 
CENTER, INC. 




617-472-7600 

www.ecomuffler.com 

25 Years of Service 

191 Quincy Ave • Quincy 



generations of Adams fam- 
ily members as well as visi- 
tors from across the country 
and the world. 

From 10 a.m to 3 p.m., 
professional and amateur 
artists, adults and children 
like, will fan out across the 
historic property to create 
their own unique perspective 
on this national treasures. 

Paintings, drawings, 
sketches and photos pro- 
duced this weekend may be 
exhibited in the 1873 Car- 
riage House on Saturday, 
July 25. 

No fee or reservations 
are required. 



I'm noticing a resurgence 
of grills, both charcoal and 
propane on balconies. In the 
recent past, we expended a 
great deal of time and ener- 
gy on getting them removed. 
Their numbers dwindled 
while 1 suspect the resur- 
gence is due to new tenants 
and new condo owners. 

Meanwhile a fire in a 
propane cylinder can have 
disastrous effects at grade 
level, but the potential for 
damage to life and prop- 
erty increases substantially 
with the inaccessibility of 
a building balcony. Danger 
to occupants and firefight- 
ers alike increases consid- 
erably when fire infringes 
upon a propane cylinder 
above grade level where 
extinguishment efforts are 
hampered by access limita- 
tions and height. If you cur- 
rently have a propane grill 
on a balcony, please help us 
in our continued effort to re- 
move them. 

Should a grill catch fire 
on a balcony, it can be fed 
by the natural availability 
of air surrounding it and the 
vertical access to the outside 
of a building where heat and 
flames will naturally extend. 



^'^\ 



Nursery School 

Now EnroUUng 

For Summer & Fall 

781-843-8030 



f 



NEAYC 



12ElinSt., Braintree 
2nd floor 



PRESCHOOL & PRE-K 
HALF DAY (am or pm) 

FULL DAY PROGRAMS 

Ages 2.9-5 years 

• Before & After School 
• Summer Programs 

•Educating young children for 
over 25 years. 
•Art, Music and Gym Programs. 

ww^JoUipoptreekidsxom 



The largest fire loss within 
the City these past 5 years 
occurred just this same way. 
Although a grill was not the 
initial cause, the results were 
the same. The fire extended 
vertically upward along the 
combustible exterior of the 
building entering the build- 
ing at a higher elevation 
causing considerable dam- 
age throughout. 

The loss was well over 
a million dollars while the 
building was then posted 
uninhabitable, leaving ten- 
ants seeking alternate living 
arrangements for well over a 
year. Is the convenience of a 
grill on a balcony worth that 
price? Property loss, pos- 
sessions lost, a building left 
uninhabitable and risk to oc- 
cupants and firefighters. 

Propane is heavier than 
air. Should a leak occur on 
a balcony, it will migrate to 
lower levels and possibly 
enter a unit below where it 
can ignite. This is a real po- 
tential hazard. As with many 
of these grills, their presence 
can pose a greater hazard to 
those living both below and 
above the level of use. 

Over the years, we 
have made quite an effort 
to eliminate their use and 
storage on apartment build- 



ing balconies. Our attempts 
continue. With limited man- 
power hours to focus on this 
effort however, we have en- 
couraged building owners to 
prohibit their use in writing 
in a tenant's lease or a condo 
by-law. 

The Quincy Fire Depart- 
ment recommends a grill 
be used at ground level, at 
least 10 feet away from both 
sources of ignition and po- 
tential combustibles such as 
wood siding, deck railings, 
etc. 

We prefer they not be left 
unattended while in use as 
well. Considering the close 
proximity of some houses 
within this community, be 
mindful of wind conditions 
and smoke migration. 

It is not our intent to 
discourage grill use or our 
residents' best efforts with 
them. However, we're look- 
ing to have them stored and 
used properly and safely. 
They have no place used or 
stored on balconies. 

Please help us in our 
continued effort to remove 
them; if you have one on a 
balcony, please remove it. If 
you are aware of one present 
on your building, notify the 
building owner or trustee of 
your concern. 

Thank you for doing so. 



..^ ^T^i 




Need a Divorce? 

We handle divorces 
in court or by mediation, 

(508) 339-1400 

Andrea T. Carty, Esq. 
Cynthia L. Hanley, Esq. 



AClPrNCTlRl 



INSl'F^ANCH 



ACUPUNCTURE ASSOCIATES 

OF THE SOUTH SHORE 

• aiNce i9a2 • 

; VOU SICK AND TMKO 



ori 



Tn^ AoifMMctmtl 



AcMruNCTwna i« A aAfm ANp •rPBcnvc roA AmtovcD 

kTWHTNT mom OVm 90 MKALTM CONOmOMS IWCL U O tWO : 




DAILEY TAX fr IMSURAMCE, IMC. 

All your insurance needs! 
HOME • AUTO • BUSINESS • LIFE 

We are able to tailor make insurance programs to provide 

maximum protection in all lines at afibtdabie rates. 

Youll love our personal service. 



Notary Public 

526 Sea Street, Quincy 

Phone 617-472-8100 



Fax 617-472-8131 




To Advertise in Ms section 
call 617471-3100 ^ 



Quincy's Own Weekly Newspaper Since 1968 

You Will Enjoy Consistent Identification 
• Quality Readership • 



FOOTTNOTES 

by Joel Chariton, DJP.M. 

ili|rifl«ate, AacricM iMuri of PMtatrk Swgerf 
Di^ptaMtt, AMflcui Btifi if MHttric Onhtj^Aci 

THE ROOT CAUSE OF MOST FOOT PROBLEMS 




In 20 years, many feet 
have passed through my 
door. The reason for pain 
in the majority of them is 
due to the obliteration of a 
funnel-shaped space in the 
rear of the foot called the 
sinus tarsi, which is located 
t)0tween the talus arxl cal- 
caneus. 

Since we average up 
to 15.000 steps a day, the 
t)iochemical pathology can 
lead to devastating foot 
problems. There are three 
phases of one's gait: heel 
contact (rigid foot), mid- 
stance (mobile adaptor 
foot), and push-off (rigid foot 
again). 

If the arch collapses dur- 
ing mid-startce, the foot is 
flexible when it should be 
rigid. This can lead to bun- 
ions, hammertoes, heel 
pain, and mon. The best 



way to prevent the oblitera- 
tion of the space is to put a 
spacer or stent in the sinus 
tarsi. I have been using this 
r>ew techrK)k)gy in my prac- 
tice. It is done at a local 
hospital in day surgery. The 
patient is back in shoes or 
sneakers in a week. 

Check out www.hypfcure. 
com. You wHI see a detailed, 
easy-to-understand expla- 
natkxi of this wonderful new 
procedure. Ankle, knee, hip, 
and back problems are also 
greatly relieved when the 
foot is property aligned. Ear- 
ly morning, night and daily 
appointments are available 
by calling 781 -986-3668. All 
patients are welcome. Our 
offtees are kx^rted at Milton 
Medk;al BuikJing, Suite 221 ; 
the Randolph Medk»l Offk» 
BuikNng, 999 North Main St. ; 
and Quincy Medteal Center. 



Thursday, July 16, 2009 Tlie Qtaincy Stin Page 13 



QMC - Henry Bosworth Memorial Golf 
Classic Benefits Medication Safety Program 



Generous supporters, 
weekend duffers and avid 
golfers alike gathered at the 
Granite Links Golf Club at 
Quarry Hills recently for 
the Quincy Medical Center- 
Henry Bosworth Memorial 
Golf Classic. 

The tournament raised 
nearly $140,000 to support 
the hospital's Medication 
Safety Program, an ongoing 
performance improvement 
initiative directed at enhanc- 
ing patient care. 

"On behalf of everyone 
at Quincy Medical Center, 
I would like to thank to our 
presenting sponsor Mintz 
Levin, reception sponsor 
South Shore Savings Bank, 
host sponsor Granite Links 
Golf Club and luncheon 
sponsor attorney George G. 
Burke, as well as the many 
other South Shore business 
and civic leaders, QMC 
physicians, trustees, ven- 
dors and employees who 
supported this event," said 
tournament chairman An- 
thony Agnitti , Agnitti Insur- 
ance Agency. 



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ll 




SAVIN(i THIS driver for next year: Brendan IMaguaran. Ml), 
claims his raffle prize at the QVl("-Henrv Bosworth memorial 
(iolf Classic. 




ACCEPTIN(. IHtlR COMMEMORATIVE plaque are Henr> Bosworth's widow Dorothy 
Bosworth (left) and daughter Donna Gray. Presenting the plaque are (from left to right) QMC 
Chairman of the Board Robert Curry, Golf Classic Honorary Chairman George Burke, Esq., 
QMC President & CEO Gary Gibbons, MD, and QMC-Henry Bosworth Memorial Golf Classic 
Chairman Anthony Agnitti. 

the late Henry W. Bosworth, ings, and an awards presen- 
Jr., publisher of The Quincy tation. Capturing first place 
Sun and beloved commu- with a score of 56 was the 
nity figure. Honorary Chair- foursome of Robert Par- 
man of the Golf Classic was ris. Jr., Robert Parris, III, 
Bosworth's close friend and Andrew Parris and Mark 
associate, attorney George Thompson. The second 
Burke. Burke paid tribute place team was LVI Envi- 
it was held in memory of to Bosworth during the lun- ronmental's foursome: Paul 

cheon program that followed Holtslag , Andy Carver, Paul 

the tournament and present- Carrel and Troy McGrath, 

ed the Bosworth family with third place went to Eastern 

a plaque commemorating Bank/Insurance's team of 

the day. Don Uvanitte, Dana Childs, 

The luncheon gathering Dave Sawyer and Larry 

also included raffle draw- Spencer. 



"It is due to their ongo- 
ing commitment that this 
golf classic has been a lead- 
ing fundraising event for the 
hospital for 20 years." 

This year's tournament 
held special meaning for 
many in attendance because 



WINNING FOURSOME: Mark Thompson, Andrew Parris, 
Robert Parris, III, and Robert Parris, Jr. 



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Page 14 Tbie QvLkxxcy Svua. Thursday, July 16, 2009 




LT. DAN MINTON 



A Job Well Done 

On Tuesday, June 30, Officers A.J. Carthas and Matt 
Hockney were dispatched to the Wollaston Theater locat- 
ed at 14 Beale St. for a "pos- 
sible vandalism" that just oc- 
curred. 

Officer Carthas arrived 
within 10 seconds and imme- 
diately began searching for the 
suspect as the description was 
given out. The dispatcher stat- 
ed that the caller lived in the 
area and spotted the suspect 
in the Sovereign Bank park- 
ing lot, located directly next to 
the theater. 

The officers met with the 
caller and learned that the sus- 
pect wandered around the lot for about 5 minutes, then 
went into an alleyway that runs behind the movie theater 
and went the bathroom. The caller lost sight of the sus- 
pect, then heard glass break moments later. 

The officers checked that area of the Wollaston 
Theater and located a broken window, with the screen 
pulled back. Directly below the window was a shop- 
ping cart which was set up as an apparent step to gain 
entry through the window. 

The officers believed that the suspect was now 
in the building, so additional units arrived to se- 
cure the perimeter of the building. Officer Bob- 
by Kelly, and Sergeant Gerald Connolly respond- 
ed along with Officer Dave Cooper and his K-9. 
With the perimeter surrounded. Officer Cooper and his 
dog, Deco went through the same window it was believed 
the suspect used and began a search of the movie the- 
ater. 

Officer Cooper entered the pitch-dark building and 
instructed his K-9 to "find" the suspect. Less than five 
minutes later, the suspect was found hiding behind some 
chairs. Officer Cooper called for Officers to enter the 
building to assist in arresting the suspect. 

Officer Carthas placed the suspect under arrest and 
transported him to the station for booking. The suspect, 
a 37-year-old Quincy resident, was charged with Break- 
ing and Entering in the Night (Felony), and Defacing/ 
Vandalizing Property. 

Based on recent armed robberies at the 7 Eleven store 
located at 721 Hancock St., which is right around the cor- 
ner. Detectives will determine if this suspect matches the 
description of that robbery. The suspect is a known sub- 
stance abuser and the suspect at 7 ELEVEN was armed 
with a syringe on two occasions. The suspect lives close 
to both the theater and the 7 Eleven store. 
^ Nice Work! > 



QUINCY POLICE HOT SPOTS 



If you have information on the above crimes, drug 
activity or any crime, please call the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 617-745-5764 or log onto the 
following website: http://tinyiirl.com/ytf6td. 

If you wish to report suspicious drug activity, call 
the Drug Hot-Line at 617-328-4527. You will not be 
required to identify yourself, but it could help. If you 
wish to make an ^pointment to view the Registered 
Sex Offenders book, call Detective Cindy Walsh at 
617-745-5751. 

If you wish to contact the Crime Prevention OfiEk:er 
for tips or comments, ray direct line is 617-745-5719. 
My e-mail address is dminton@cii]uincyina.us 

-U. Dan Minton 



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QUINCY POLICE STATISTICS: JULY 3 - JULY 9 

T^ta l Cal ls fo r Sgrvj g e: 1,157 
Total Arrests : 36 

Total S tQ Jcn MQto r Ve hicles: 4 
FRIDAY. JULY 3 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7: 13 a jn., Torre Dei Passeri 
Social Club, 252 Washington St Graffiti. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:32 a jn., Hassan Brothers, 
Inc., 290 Washington St. Windows. Three windows broken 
sometime overnight. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:45 a.m.. Masters Photog- 
raphy, 1426 Hancock St. Broken window. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:31 a.m.. Water Street 
Petroleum, 376 Water St. Spray-paint. Two vehicles and the 
building spray-painted. 

LARCENY, 9:55 a.m.. Home Depot, 465 Centre St 
Shoplifting. Arrest made. One subject under arrest. Charges 
larceny over. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:27 a.m., 53 Union St 
Broken window. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:56 a.m., Martin Realty 
Co. Business. Windows and door glass broken. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:05 a.m., Cedrone Luber 
Finer Sales, 364 Water St Paint. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 4:12 p.m.. Cox C.A. 
Automotive, 60 Beale St. Toyota 4-Runner, color silver. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 4:38 p.m., Cavanaugh 
Field, 101 Faxon Rd. Receiving stolen property. 

ARMED ROBBERY, 6:43 p.m.. Citizens Bank, 495 
Southern Artery. No weapon shown. Suspect: white male, 
30-40 years old, wire-rimmed glasses, 1-2 days beard growth, 
long sleeved gray shirt, logo; dark ball cap. He alluded to hav- 
ing a weapon. 6-feet tall. Over $4,000 taken. Crew cut, fled 
south. Crew cut. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:36 p.m., 16 Turner St. 
Broken fence. Drunk just fell through fence. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:13 p.m., 16 Lawrence St 
Fence. Someone pulled down the chainlink fence. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 11:46 a.m., 
18 Albany St. Dwelling. White male, wearing a white t-shirt, 
Bermuda shorts, broke into a car out front ran towards Elm- 
wood Ave. 

SATURDAY. J IJI .Y 4 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 12:07 a.m., 22 Bird St Past 
Caller stated she was punched in the face and knows who did it. 
Victim has limited info. Will seek own complaints. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 4:36 a.m., Tedeschi Food 
Shop, 495 Washington St. Male. Broke a window. Arrest made 
for malicious destruction. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9 am., 16 Beale St Telephone 
line cut overnight. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 9:50 a.m., 94 Bower Rd 
Past. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:30 ajn., 319 Copeland 
St. To car. Rear window painted. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:31 am., Rock Island Rd. 
and 'Rimer St. Keyed vehicle. Car was keyed on the entire pas- 
senger side as well as the passenger side rear near the roof. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:09 p.iii., Tom O'Brien 
Hyundai, 479 Washington St. Smashed windows. Caller states 
a few of their windows look like they were possibly shot with 
a BB gun. Four cars damaged. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, Seven Eleven Store, 
363 Hancock St. Possibly abandoned. Ignition popped, car 
rummaged through. Owner stated motor vehicle was left at 60 
Beale St. for repair. Unknown how it got to 7-11. Employee 
stated motor vehicle was parked there in morning of July 3. 
2001 Toyota 4-Runner, color silver. 

SUNDAY, niT.Y 5 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 12:26 p.m., 10 
Harvard St. Residential. 

LARCENY, 5:37 p jn., 1025 Hancock St. Credit card. 

LARCENY, 6:31 p.m., Wendy's Restaurant, 520 South- 
ern Artery. Wallet. Arrest made. 

MONDAY. .TUI.Y 6 

LARCENY, 2:30 am., 9 Pierce St. Fare evasion. Caller 
claims parties left out of cab. Unable to locate suspect. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 6:25 am., WORK, 
Inc., 30 Fayette St. Stolen van. 2004 Ford Econo Van, color 
white. Last ween on Saturday, was parked in rear of building. 
No record of being towed or queried recently. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:52 am., 115 East Squan- 
tum St. Motor vehicle damage. Driver's side door lock dam- 
aged, no suspect. Happened over the weekend. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10: 11 am., Manet Ave. and 
Sea St. Vehicle keyed. Hood of the car as well as the back and 
the passenger side. "Nazi" sign carved into the hood. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 1:14 pm.. We Car? Clean- 



ers, 58 Quincy Ave. Spraypainted walls and roof. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 1:31 pjn.. Father Bill's 
Place, 38 Broad St. Lojack equipped. Possibly stolen vehicle 
and medication. 1999 Ford Taurus, color brown. 

LARCENY, 10:47 p.m., Boston Market, 126 Granite St. 
Cell phone. Party called phone and male party stated he would 
return phone for $100. Advised. Caller went to Weymouth 
PD. 

TUESDAY, JULY 7 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 10:51 a.m., 128 
Brook Rd. Dwelling. Entry made, computer taken. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 12:39 p.m.. New 
England Electric Scooter, 333 Victory Rd. Business. Veloteq 
Commander Electric Scooter (2008, color blue) taken from 
premises while in for repairs. No sign of forced entry, occurred 
on July 5. Nothing in report says scooter was being repair; show 
it is owned by business/caller. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:56 p.m., 136 Old Colony 
Ave. Mirror. Black male wearing brown t-shirt with white de- 
signs on it with a short afro running towards Coffee Express 
on Old Colony. Suspect gone on arrival; wing mirror of caller's 
motor vehicle broken 

LARCENY, 1:03 p.m., Colonial Federal Savings ATM, 
730 Hancock St. By credit card. 

LARCENY, 2:41 p.m., Marriott Hotel, 1000 Marriott 
Dr. Money. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8 p.m., Giarrusso Norton 
Cooley McGlon, 308 Victory Rd Past. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 8:05 p.m., 437 
Newport Ave. Dwelling. Cash and debit card (which has already 
been used), known missing. 

WEDNESDAY. JULY 8 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:47 a.m., 393 Granite St 
Graffiti on building. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:12 am., 19 Rock Island 
Rd. To yard. Minor damage. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 12: 12 p.m.. Presidents 
Plaza, 215 Quincy Ave. Past. 2006 Mazda MPV van, color 
gray. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 12:19 pm., 4 
Figurehead Ln. Dwelling. Basement storage area broken into. 
Items taken. Lock pried; clothes, jewelry, tide and a microwave 
were stolen. Microwave was returned nearby though. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:37 pm.. Atrium at Faxon 
Woods, 2003 Falls Blvd. Light pole. Street light pole snapped 
off, happened overnight. Stop sign also taken down. 

LARCENY, 1:14 p.m., DZ Motors, 245 WUlard St By 
check. This involves a "bounced check." No charges at this 
time. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 4:11 pm., 2 City 
View Ln. Dwelling. XBox, Apple laptop, Toshiba laptop, iPod 
Nano, jewelry and cash known missing. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 4:43 pm., 4 Prout 
St. Dwelling. Pitbull named Damita taken, bleach poured on 
victim's clothes. 

THURSDAY niTY 9 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 12:29 a.m., 108 Bromfield 
St. Just happened. Caller alleges cab driver assaulted him and 
his girlfriend and then took off with two handbags inside cab. 
Was picked up in Boston but assault happened here. Stems from 
some type of fare dispute. 

LARCENY, 7:39 am., 48 Baystate Rd UPS package. 
Male caller reports his UPS package was open and item inside 
taken. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 10:28 am.. Fours Boston, 
15 Cottage Ave. Past incident. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 10:42 am., Nep- 
onset Landing, 2 Hancock St. Television stolen from media 
room. Incident was caught on surveillance video. $2,0(X) flat 
screen stolen from within. "Media room" is common area. Oc- 
curred around 1 a.m. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 11:15 am., 53 Wood- 
bine St. Past. 1995 Satum SC2, color red. 

Q 

STOLEN MOTOR VEHICLES: Woodbine Street, 
President's Plaza on Quincy Avenue, low numbers of Beale 
Street, low numbers of Fayette Street. 

□ 

CAR BREAKS: Brook Street, Connell Street, Sealund 
Road, Dimmock Street, Webster Street, Miller Street, Hoop- 
er Street, 100 block of Brook Road, 200 block of Kendrick 
Avenue 

a 

BREAKS AND ATTEMPTED BREAKS: low num- 
bers of Harvard Street, 100 block of Brook Road, 400 block 
of Newport Avenue, Figurehead Lane, City View Lane, 
Prout Street, 2 Hancock Street 



Thursday, July 16, 2009 The Qitigicy Sim Page 15 



* * * On The Campaign Trail - City Eiection 2009 * * * 



With the campaign season underway for this fall's city election. The Quincy Sun 
will publish, from time to time and when space is available, press releases submit- 
ted from candidates and their committees. 

The Sun wants its readers to know the releases are not written by Quincy Sun 
staff. The Sun retains the right to edit releases for space purposes. 

Barbara Isola Candidate 
For Quincy School Committee 



Emily Lebo Announces 
Candidacy For School Committee 



Barbara Isola of 34 Rand- 
lett St., Quincy, announces 
her candidacy for Quincy 
School Committee. 

In her announcement, 
Isola said, "For the last 14 
years I have been commit- 
ted to helping our children 
receive an excellent educa- 
tion. My children attended 
Beech wood Knoll School, 
Central Middle School and 
North Quincy High School. 

"My daughter just gradu- 
ated from North Quincy 
High School and my son 
graduated from the same 
school in 2007. Both of my 
children had a wonderful ex- 
perience in the Quincy Pub- 
lic Schools. They received 
a first rate education, made 
many good friends and both 
got accepted into many fine 
colleges." 

Isola noted her past ex- 
perience and commitment to 
the Quincy Public Schools: 

• Actively served on the 
parent teacher organization 
at each school my children 
attended, and was President 
or an officer of each organi- 
zation. 

• Served as a representa- 
tive to the Citywide Parents' 
Council for each school my 
children attended. "I also 
served as treasurer, vice- 
president, president and co- 
president of the Citywide 
Parent's Council over the 
years." 

• Member of the School 
Improvement Council for 
each school her children at- 
tended. Participated in writ- 



ing the annual school im- 
provement plan. 

• Named Citizen of the 
Year by the Ward Five 
Community Association in 
recognition of her service to 
the schools. 

• Helped found the 
Friends of the Media Cen- 
ter to raise money and get 
books donated to school li- 
braries. 

"I certainly do not stand 
alone in my commitment 
to the schools," Isola said. 
"Over the last 14 years 1 
have been so fortunate to 
work with many parents 
who have graciously given 
their time and skills to help 
ensure our children receive 
a quality education. 

"I have seen first hand 
what can be accomplished 
when parents, administra- 
tors and teachers work to- 
gether for a common goal. 
This is what I want to foster, 
if elected as a member of the 
School Committee. 

"People have asked me, 
'Why do you want to run 
for School Committee when 
your children have gradu- 
ated?' My answer is that I 
firmly believe our public ed- 
ucation system is the core of 
our community and I want 
to do my part to ensure that 
other children receive the 
same quality education that 
my children received. 

"We are in the midst 
of very difficult economic 
times that require strong and 
experienced people on the 
School Committee to ad- 



vocate for our schools and 
our children. Why are the 
schools so important to our 
community? Because good 
schools attract good young 
families to our community. 

"Crood schools produce 
educated young adults who 
raise the standard of living 
and quality of life of our 
community. Good schools 
benefit all property own- 
ers by increasing the value 
of our homes. So we all 
have a vested interest in our 
schools; not just the parents 
with children in the school 
system. 

"In addition to being in- 
volved in the schools, my 
husband (Timothy McA- 
loon) and I have been ac- 
tively involved in the com- 
munity. Recently, we have 
had the pleasure of working 
with the dedicated people 
at Quincy Access Televi- 
sion to create two member 
produced shows: a cooking 
show. Into the Frying Pan, 
which I host, and Inside In- 
formation, that Tim hosts. 
Prior to this we have been 
involved in a number of 
civic organizations and vol- 
unteered time to different 
community activities. 

"I would like the opportu- 
nity to continue to serve our 
community as a representa- 
tive on the School Commit- 
tee. If the voters see fit to 
elect me, I promise to com- 
mit my time and talents and 
be a strong advocate for our 
children and our schools," 
she added. 



Emily Lebo, 354 High- 
land Ave., WoUaston, an- 
nounces her candidacy for 
the Quincy School Commit- 
tee. 

A registered nurse, 
teacher and educational ad- 
ministrator, Lebo has lived 
in the Wollaston neighbor- 
hood for more than 30 years 
where she and her husband, 
Stu, raised their three sons. 
Their oldest grandchild will 
be starting preschool at Snug 
Harbor in the fall. 

Having worked in the 
Quincy Public Schools for 
twenty years, Lebo focused 
her work on the expansion 
of educational opportunities 
for students. She started 
the Quincy Evening High 
School Program which 
helped to reduce the number 
of high school dropouts in 
the city, and also broadened 
the Career and Technical 
Education Program to in- 
clude programming at North 
Quincy High School. 

Additionally, she led the 
district's Community Ser- 
vice Learning Team and 
started a pre-engineering 
program at Quincy High 
School. Lebo also worked 
with the Technology Engi- 
neering teachers in Quincy 
middle schools to align their 
teaching with the state stan- 
dards. 

Currently serving as the 
Boston Public Schools Di- 
rector of Career & Voca- 




EMILY LEBO 

tional Technical Education, 
Lebo oversees city-wide ef- 
forts to develop and improve 
technical programmmg for 
more than 4, (XX) students. 

She has brought "green 
technology" to the reper- 
toire of academic offerings 
and has worked to insure 
that students enrolled m 
DYS have access to skill- 
buildmg opportunities after 
school. Committed to the 
needs of disabled students, 
she oversees the district's 
STRIVE program which 
supports cognitively and 
physically handicapped stu- 
dents as they transition to 
adult life. 

Lebo was recently ap- 
pointed by the Massachu- 
setts Commissioner of 
Education to co-chair the 
Career/Vocational Technical 
Education Advisory Council 
where she actively works to 
improve student achieve- 
ment and improve the de- 
livery of Career/Vocational 



Technical Education m the 
state. The council has made 
several recommendations 
to the Board of Elementary 
and Secondary Education 
and continues to be a driv- 
ing force in educational 
programming across the re- 
gion. 

Lebo said she is com- 
mitted to ensunng that all 
students have an opportu- 
nity to develop a vision ot 
a successful adult life and 
are given the tools in school 
to achieve their goals She 
said her years of expenence 
in education coupled with 
her time as a health care 
practitioner has already al- 
lowed her to make a marked 
difference in many student 
lives in Quincy and Boston 
and she seeks to further this 
work as a member of the 
Quincy School Committee. 

"Having dedicated my ca- 
reer to ensunng that no stu- 
dent is a victim of an Oppor- 
tunity or Expectation gap. I 
look forward to assisting the 
City of Quincy in the devel- 
opment and improvement of 
innovative programming for 
all students." she added. 



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Page 16 Tbe Qtiincy Syui Thursday, July 16, 2009 



Inside Renovated 
Abigail Adams Cairn 

Over 100 

Witness Time 

Capsule Buried 

In Cairn 



Cont 'd From Page I 

after officials last year de- 
clared its crumbing condi- 
tion an emergency. 

The monument, which 
marks the location where 
Abigail Adams took young 
John Quincy Adams to 
watch the Battle of Bunker 
Hill in 1775, was rebuilt 
using its original stones by 
masons from Phoenix Bay 
State Construction. During 
the project, workers uncov- 
ered a copper box that turned 
out to be a time capsule dat- 
ing to the Cairn's original 
dedication in 1896. 

The new time capsule, 
in a larger copper box, was 
placed inside the Cairn and 
sealed by brick and covered 
by a new granite plaque at 
the ceremony. Workers from 
Sheetmetal Workers Lo- 
cal 17 built the capsule and 
sealed it shut prior to Satur- 
day's event, which included 



music and a ceremonial vol- 
ley by the Braintree Militia. 

"From Councillor Ray- 
mondi pressing for the re- 
pairs, to the discovery of the 
original capsule, to this new 
piece of history, this has 
been a true community ef- 
fort," Koch said. 'These are 
the kinds of things that make 
Quincy so special, and 1 am 
grateful to everyone who 
helped make it happen." 

Koch yielded the mi- 
crophone at the event to 
his daughter Abigail, who 
spoke about her namesake's 
impact on history and the 
future. Raymondi also took 
time to talk about the role 
women played during the 
Revolutionary years and the 
importance of the Cairn. 

"Abigail famously said 
'Remember the ladies,' so 
it is incredibly important 
that our conununity came 
together to ensure that this 




PENN'S HILL neighbors held a celebration at the Abigail Ad- 
ams Cairn with more than 100 residents of Viden Road and 
FrankUn Street attending. The celebration was held a few days 

monument to her courage 
and her role will stand for 
the ages," Raymondi said. 

Quincy Historical So- 
ciety's Edward Fitzgerald, 
who coordinated efforts 
around the new time cap- 
sule, said unlike traditional 
time capsules, there would 
be no set timeline for open- 
ing the capsule. 

"It might not be 100 
years, it could be 200 or 
even 300 years before any- 
one opens this time cap- 
sule," Fitzgerald said. 



before the dedication of a new time capsule that was placed 
inside the restored Cairn on Saturday. 





TIME CAPSULE made from a copper box is placed inside the restored Abigail Adams Cairn 
by Duanne Hayden, stone mason of Phoenix Bay State Construction, Inc. The box was built by 
workers from Sheeetmetal Workers Local 17. Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Noble 



ADMIRING THE restored Abigail Adams Cairn and new time capsule granite tablet are Ed- 
ward Fitzgerald (left), executive director of the Quincy Historical Society; and Jim Edwards, 
president of the Quincy Historical Society. 





WARD 2 COUNCILLOR Dan Raymondi (at podium), who was instrumental in restoring the 
Abigail Adams Cairn, speaks at Saturday's time capsule dedication. 




AffiMDBERS OF THE Phoenix Bay State Construction, Inc. who restored the Abigail Adams f-' 

Cairn. From left: Bill Whall, principle; Duanne Hayden, stone mason; Joe Goncalves, field so- RECEPTICAL IN Abigail Adams Calm is sealed off by Duanne Hayden, stone mason of Phoe- 

perintendent; and Bob Marry, laborer. nix Bay SUtc Constmctioa, Inc. 



Thursday, July 16, 2009 The QiEJncy Sxuck Page 17 




LT. COMMANDER Christopher 
Orlowski of the Quincy Naval Re- 
serve Center, was among the guest 
speakers at a ceremony marking the 
242nd birthday anniversary of John 
Quincy Adams at United First Par- 
ish Church. 



CAROLINE KEINATH, deputy 
superintendent of the Adams Na- 
tional Historical Park, speaks at 
a ceremony commemorating the 
242nd birthday anniversary of John 
Quincy Adams, 6th President of the 
United States. 



PETER BOYLSTON ADAMS, 
treasurer of the Adams Memorial 
Foundation and great-great-great- 
grandson of John Quincy Adams, 
Has also a featured speaker at the 
ceremonv. 



MAYOR rOM KOC H brings of- 
ficial greetings on behalf of the cit> 
at a ceremony commemorating the 
242nd birthday anni\ersar> of John 
Quincy Adams at the I nited First 
Parish Church. 



AR I HI R DICHARME, director of 
the Historic Interpretive Program at 
I nited First Parish Church, offers a 
tribute to John Quinc> Adams, the 
6th President of the I nited States. 
Quiiu y Sun PhoKisI Robert Sohle 



John Q. Adams' Service To City, Nation Remembered 



Cant 'd From Pa^e I 

The following morn- 
ing, over 100 attended the 
rededication of the Abigail 
Adams' Cairn where John 
Quincy Adams, then seven 
years old, heard the thunder 
of canons and witnessed the 
smoke from the Battle of 
Bunker Hill of the American 
Revolution. 

It made a lasting impres- 
sion on the young Adams, 
according to Dr. Edward 
Fitzgerald, Quincy Histori- 
cal Society. 

The third event was held 
on Saturday afternoon, 250 
officials, residents, tourists 
and New Hampshire resi- 
dents joined Russian visitors 
at Adams National Histori- 
cal Park to commemorate 
JQA's genius in internation- 
al relations which began at 
age 14 when he served as a 
translator. 

Adams' distinguished 
public service, also, in- 
cluded election as congress- 
man, senator and president 
as well as appointments as 
Secretary of State and min- 
ister to Russia, envoy to the 
Netherlands. 

Fittingly, Adams spoke 
his last words in Congress 
where he was fatally strick- 
en on Feb. 21,1 848 and died 
two days later. 

Rev. Sheldon Bennett, 
Minister at the Presidents' 
Church, noted Adams lived 
up to his motto to serve an- 
other age as his work pro- 
vides the basis for many of 
our freedoms today. 

Mayor Thomas Koch, 
Peter Boylston Adams and 
Mary Claffey, Massachu- 
setts Historical Society, all 
cited Adams strong belief 
in the abolition of slavery. 
Claffey outlined Adams' 18 
years' work in Washington 
"as one of the strongest abo- 
litionist forces in congress. 

Peter Boylston Adams, 
a direct descendant of both 
presidents, also commended 
city officials for protecting 
the legacy of 100 acres of 
Adams' land given the city 



by his forebears and ex- 
pressed the hope it will re- 
main untouched and unde- 
veloped "as a lasting gift." 

Caroline Keinath, Depu- 
ty Superintendent at Adams 
National Historical Park de- 
scribed Adams' diplomatic 
successes, particulariy in 
Russia where the United 
States and Russia are mark- 
ing the 200th anniversary 
of Adams' work as ambas- 
sador. 

One of the visitors at Fri- 
day's service Jim Cooke, 
portrays John Quincy Ad- 
ams at events in the states 
and locally. Cooke just com- 
pleted a ten-day tour of Rus- 
sia for the state department 
and described the interest he 
found on Russian university 
campuses where he met 600 
to700 students dressed a 
John Quincy Adams. 

While Adams succeeded 
in the public sphere, he was 
also known for his curt na- 
ture which, at times, verged 
on "vitriolic," according 
to Dr. Edward Fitzgerald 
Quincy Historical Society. 

Fitzgerald described Ad- 
ams' firm belief in the Con- 
stitution and democracy but, 
also, noted he didn't hide 
his opinions on subjects or 
people. 

In his diary, he called the 
dedication of Bunker Hill 
monument a 'burlesque' be- 
cause the featured speakers 
were President John Tyler 
and Daniel Webster. 

"What has this (cer- 
emony) to do with Quincy 
granite, a symbol of New 
England character?" Ad- 
ams asked rhetorically in his 
diary notes about the cer- 
emony. 

Lt. Commander Chris- 
topher Orlowski, USN, 
led the official delegation 
to the tombs below where 
the four-foot wreath of red, 
white and blue flowers from 
the president was laid atop 
Adams' crypt. 

This wreath marked the 
25th year that local florist, 
Clifford Flowers, has pre- 




MEMBERS OF THE Quincy Naval Rt>ti>t Cti.iti carry a 
Presidential Wreath from inside United First Parish Church 
to the crypt in the church where it was laid on the tomb of 6th 
President John Quincy Adams. 



MR. AND MRS. Peler Boylston Adams ItaMiig I nited First 
Parish Church after the ceremony commemorating the 242nd 
birthday anniversary of John Quincy Adams. 




QUINCY NAVAL RESERVE Center members "present arms" 
during the National Anthem at last Friday's ceremony which 

pared the president's wreath stands out because he didn't 

for the Adams' wreath-lay- always go for the status quo 

ing ceremony. and "didn't try to appease 

Orlowski said Adams crowds" but rather believed 



commemorated the 242nd birthday anniversary of John Quin- 
cy Adams, the 6th President of the United States. 



it was better to "stand on 
principal even if you stand 
alone." 

Some 50-60 police cadets 



from the police academy on 
Sea Street attended the cere- 
mony in full dress uniform. 



Page 18 Tl&e Quincy Sim Thursday, July 16, 2009 



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THIS 
ISA 




Ceiling Fans Can Save Energy All Year Long 



WAMMER 



By Samantha Mazzotta 

Ready, Set, 
Paint! 



DEAR HAMMER: I 
hope this tip will be useful 



the walls, I stick the small 
screws that attach them to 
a piece of painter's tape 
and then put that tape on 
the back of the cover. 
Hope your readers 



UnionviUe, Conn. 



to some of your readers, ^jy g^j ^^me organizing 
I'm a die-hard do-it-your- ^^^^ ^om this! - Jared in 
selfer, and every spare 
moment I'm finding some- 
thing else to do around the DEAR JARED: Great 
house. I also don't like to j^p, ^nd many thanks for 
putter around too much 3haring them. As you can 
when I start a project, so 3^^ organizing a DIY- 
I keep a lot of things or- friendly garage or storage 
ganized where I can grab ^^a doesn't mean you need 
them and get gomg. ^^ i^^ve strict categories and 
For painting, there is ^eat shelves. Things can 
a metal shelf unit in my ^e grouped in certain areas 
garage where used and .. such as painting supplies 



new paint cans, brushes, 
rollers and pans are kept. 
Whenever my wife rer 
tires a set of bedsheets, I 
fold up the flat sheets in a 
box on the shelf to use as 
dropcloths. I also keep a 
filter mask and goggles, a 
box of disposable rubber 



or lawn-care tools - and 
placed in containers that are 
easy to grab and take to the 
work area. 

Readers, do you have or- 
ganizing tips you'd like to 
share? Pass them on! 

HOME TIP: When 



gloves, an old flannel shirt pointing a masonry or wood 

and a pan- of old sneakers walkway, mix fine sand into 

m that box. So all I have jj^^ p^^^ y^e sand will pro- 

to do IS grab that box, the ^^^^ ^dded traction when 

paint I need and brushes, ^^^ walkway is wet. 
and I'm ready to go. 



ready to go. 
Painter's tape is also 
good for more than just 
masking-off areas. Since 
I usually have to remove 
socket and light switch 
covers in order to paint 



Send questions or home- 
repair tips to homeguru2000@ 
hotmail.com, or write This Is 
a Hammer, do King Features 
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando. FL 32853-6475. 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



(ARA) - Gas and energy 
prices are rising again, and 
that means Americans must 
tighten their belts even fur- 
ther. You don't need to dread 
hot summer temps and high 
air conditioning bills when 
you have ceiling fans in 
your home. 

If you already have 
fans in place, check to see 
whether they are Energy 
Star qualified. Ceiling fan 
and light combinations that 
have earned Energy Star 
accreditation are about 50 
percent more efficient than 
non-conforming units. The 
difference lies in improved 
motors and blade designs. A 
model with an Energy Star 
light kit included provides 
even greater energy savings, 
and the bulbs don't need to 
be changed as often. 

"Consumer demand for 
more energy-efficient prod- 
ucts has driven the industry 
to integrate new lighting, 
blade and motor technolo- 
gies that save operating 
costs. New products inte- 
grating the latest technolo- 
gies are up to 75 percent 
more efficient than previous 
models" says Steve Cox, 
vice president and general 
manager of Emerson Ceil- 
ing Fans. 

Paul Vrabel , a principal at 
ICF International, an energy 
solutions firm that partners 
with govemment clients, 
explains how to operate 
fans correctly. "Put them on 
when you are in the room 
— during the day and when 
sleeping - and turn them 
off when you leave. Ceiling 



fans cool people, not air," 
he says. "Using fans wisely 
while turning down the lair 
conditioner] can save a lot 
of money." 

Ceiling fans do such an 
efficient job of circulating 
air, they probably should be 
everywhere. "Any type of 
room can benefit," says Na- 
than Frampton, president of 
ceiling fan company Fani- 
mation. "Bedrooms, family 
rooms, and exterior living 
spaces are the most com- 
mon applications, but we 
are seeing [them used] more 
in larger bathrooms, walk- 
in closets, home offices and 
garages." 

Size matters 

Dennis Davenport, vice 
president of product devel- 
opment for Monte Carlo 
Fans, concurs. "Consumers 
are installing ceiling fans 
throughout their homes," he 
says, pointing to the rapid 
growth of models in all siz- 
es. "For example, fans with 
blade spans of 54, 60 and 72 
inches are increasingly pop- 
ular for living rooms, while 
those with 24-inch spans are 
being installed in hallways 
and walk-in closets." 

How do you estimate the 
best size for your needs? "A 
good rule of thumb is a 36- 
to 52-inch diameter blade 
sweep for rooms measur- 
ing 200 square feet or less," 
Frampton says. "For rooms 
200 to 400 square feet, we 
recommend a diameter 
of 52 inches or greater; if 
the space is more than 400 
square feet, two or more 
fans will be needed." 



The number of blades 
makes some difference in 
airflow, however, whether 
to choose a four-, five-, or 
six-blade version is really a 
matter of aesthetics, accord- 
ing to Frampton. "You hear a 
lot about blade pitch, diam- 
eter and motor size. These 
are factors that will affect 
airflow, but in the end the 
best way to judge is to stand 
under the fan you prefer and 
decided if the airflow feels 
sufficient," he says. 

It's important not to un- 
derestimate. "The most 
common size sold in the 
U.S. is a 52-inch diameter. 
This fan size provides ex- 
cellent results in rooms 
up to 150 square feet, but 
can also be appropriate for 
smaller rooms since it can 
be adjusted with multiple 
speeds and the direction of 
the blades can be reversed," 
says Joe Rey-Barreau, edu- 
cation consultant for the 
American Lighting Associa- 
tion (ALA) and an associate 
professor at the University 
of Kentucky's School of In- 
terior Design. "It's better to 
choose a slightly larger fan 
for a room than to choose a 
diameter that might prove to 
be too small to adequately 
provide air movement." 

Do you need a light kit? 

Many fans now come 
with integrated lighting or 
offer a coordinating light kit 
available as an option. These 
lights do not offer enough il- 
lumination on their own, but 
they are useful in a room 
that already has some form 
of ambient lighting. "Ceil- 



ing fan lights should be con- 
sidered as accent and mood 
lighting," Davenport says. 

Should a ceiling fan 
blend in or stand out? 

The next step to consider 
is whether you'd like it to 
serve as a focal point or be 
more understated. "Is the 
room contemporary, tradi- 
tional, tropical or transition- 
al? Ceiling fans can serve 
as a design feature," says 
Frampton. 

."The primary trend in 
ceiling fan design has been 
for styles that create aes- 
thetic statements as bold 
as a chandelier," says Rey- 
Barreau. "This follows the 
overall trend in residential 
design for more varied and 
more sophisticated concepts. 
Today a consumer can find a 
ceiling fan that matches any 
interior design." 

Fans help in winter, too 

In the summer, ceiling 
fans offer a comfortable 
alternative and accompani- 
ment to air conditioning, but 
in the winter employing the 
reversible blade option pro- 
vides a means of circulating 
the hotter air that rises to 
the ceiling. This helps save 
on heating bills when the 
weather gets cold. 

For more information 
about how to utilize ceiling 
fans for year-round comfort 
in a fashionable style, con- 
tact an ALA member show- 
room. Go to www.Ameri- 
canLightingAssoc.com or 
call (800) BRIGHTIDEAS 
for a list of stores in your 
neighborhood. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 



Onlug^ 



49 Beale St., Quincy, MA 02170 
617-472-4330 

Ann«x Reoly, Inc. wwwx21aimex.com 

Over 70 Seller and Buyer Agents 

specializing in Residential, Commercial 

Real Estate, Bank Owned Properties, 

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Annex Real Estate School 

Offering Salesperson's, Broker's and Continuing Ed. classes 



Neighborhood Housing Services 
Homebuying Workshop Aug. 17, 19 



Buying your first home? income, these seminars are aspects of buying a home, 
Not sure where to begin? educational and recom- importance of home and 
What kind of mortgage is mended for all potential first lead inspections and other 



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Get these answers and 
many others when you at- 
tend one of our workshops. 
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Two luxury one bedroom rentals being offered as affordable 
housing lottery at Quarry Meadows, 328 Copeland Street, Units 
2C & 3C, Quincy, MA! Requirements: Local preferences; 
asset limit of $75,000; Income Guideline- 1 person @$46,300; 
2 persons @$52,950. Rent @$913/month each unit without 
utilities. Application deadline July 20th! Lottery Drawing July 27th! 

For more information call Lottery Agent, Affordable Housing 

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To download Lottery Guidelines & 

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time homebuyers. Partici- information, 
pants will have the opportu- This workshop is a pre- 
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to discuss many mortgage buyers mortgage and grant 
options. programs, and is open to ev- 

Also covered at the eryone throughout the state, 
workshop will be the legal regardless of income. 

The next workshop, 
sponsored by South Shore 
Savings Bank, is scheduled 
for Monday, Aug. 17 from 
5-9 p.m. and Wednesday, 



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held at South Shore Savings 
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South Weymouth. 

Attendance at both ses- 
sions is necessary to receive 
your homebuying certifi- 
cate. 

Call 617-770-2227, ext. 
31 or visit www.neighbor- 
hoodhousing.com for addi- 
tional information. 



Realty Pros ^^ 

Buying, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY - (617) 328-3200 

On the Web visit McFarlandproperties.com 




Thursday. July 16. 2009 Tl»e QiUncy Simt Page 19 



FLYNN AUCTIONS 



PRIVATE SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION 

Auction to be held on the premises 

I I Bayberry Lane, Weston, MA 



PRIVATE SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION 

Auction to be held on the premises 

Winnipesaukee Pavilion, Alton, NH 



August I S, 2009 @ I PM 



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Custom gated estate colonial with over 6 100 sq ft of living space on 1 .3 manicured, landscaped 
acres. Privately sited on culde-sac this beautiful home offers a lighted tennis/basketball court, 
spectacular bluestone patio, steam bath with shower, gourmet kitchen, game room, five bed- 
rooms, five full and two half baths. Incredible 10 ft. ceilings, detailed moldings, open floor plan, 
enclosed yard, and more. Convenient to downtown Boston, major routes and schools. 

1% Broker Participation • 6% Buyers Premium • MA LIC #300 




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UNDER AGREEMENT 



Quincy - 1 3,863 SF commercial building on 24,200 SF lot. Fully 
occupied. Includes 90'xl 10' warehouse w/16' clearance. 35x20' 
refngerated space with 2 loading doors and dock, five private 
offices totalling 800 +/- SF. Modem, updated, fully occupied. Off 
Rte. 3A near Southern Artery. Offered at $1,350,000. 




Quincy - Gas and Auto Body Shop. 3,600+/- SF building. 
1 2' walls, 4 drive-in doors, steel tanks, full service Vita 
Root reporting system. Outside Kiosks, Gilbarco dispens- 
ers/5 Blend, Spray booth and frame machine. 



FOR LEASE ) 




South Boston Seaport - 2,400 SF of Office/Commercial 
Space. Class B office Space. 2 onsite parking spaces. MBTA 
accessible via Silver Line from South Station. Sublet with 5 
years remaining. Below market @ $20/FT. 



NEED CASH FASTI 

SELL NOW AT AUCTION! 

Call for a quick assessment! 




Marshfield - Brand New Office Condos. Several units for sale. 
Ideal for medical/prof, offices. 8 1 Car Parking, Elevator, Handicap 
lavatones, Central Air, Basement Storage, Excellent access just 
off exit 1 2 on Route 3. 5 layouts to choose from. Call for floor 
plans. Pnces start at $269,000. 



Quincy- Multiple suites available m pnsmier Crown Colony Park loca- 
tion. Four suites available of Z247 SF 3,33 1 SF. 3.500 SF and 7. 1 00 SF 
Contiguous to 1 0,43 1 SF Amenrtjes include hotels, banking, shuttle 
service, food ser/ice health dub and mcxe Parking ratio is 3.5/ 1 .000 
FGF. Some turn-key space a,/aiiabte. Flexible terms, competitive 'Tents 




Quincy - Office Space for Lease. Premier space walking 
distance to Wollaston T Station. Space from 1 400+/- SF to 
1 2,400+/- SF full floor suites, featunng creative design within 
professional atmosphere. Below market rents. Full fee paid to 
cooperating brokers. 



Braintree - Office Condo for Sale - Currently a taw Onice 
749 SF located at 409 Pond at Granite and Pond. Three execu- 
tive offices and an open admin/sales area good for 3 employees. 
Pnvate entrance and bath. Storage space in unit plus basement 
space. Pnce Reduced to $157,500. 




Weymouth - Industnal Complex featunng 3 Ind. buildings on 2 
+/- Acre comer lot Two attached buildings combine for a total of 
19,938 SF. 16,795+/- sf ofwarehouse/manufactunng, 3.143+/- sf 
of office space plus 1 ,500 SF storage bidg. Active indus. park near 
exits on Rte 3. High ceilings. Call for leasing terms. $1.75 Million. 



Raynham - Located on Rte. 44 Auto mile close to Rts. 24 & 
495. 1 4,523 +/- SF building on approxiamately 2.5 acres featunng 
multiple sales offices, upper mezzanine offices, open show room & 
customer service area and large automotive service area. Offered 
at$l7,000/monthNNN. 



(617) 479-9000 • DJFIynn.com • 1495 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 



Daniel 



Page 20 Tlie Qxtincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2009 



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II I I li 

1 1 I i.1 



Real 




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Dollars 
and $en$e 

by David Uffington 



Financial Advice 
for New Parents 

Typical costs for a new 
baby can run between 
$11,000 and $16,000 for the 
first year. By the time the 
child turns 18, you'll have 
spent more than $200,000. 
If you're thinking of start- 
ing a family but the state 
of the economy makes you 
hesitate, "The Wall Street 
Journal Financial Guide- 
book for New Parents" by 
Stacey L. Bradford (Three 
Rivers Press, $14.95) offers 
many how-to ideas and sug- 
gestions. 

Here are some high- 
lights: 

• Maternity leave. If you 
work, learn the specifics of 
you company's matemity- 
or paternity-leave policy. It 
might not be what you ex- 
pect. If you assume you'll 
automatically get a certain 
amount of time off with dis- 
ability payments, and you 
end up with no salary at 
all, you need to know that 
in advance. The size of the 
company dictates what it's 
obligated to give you — if 
anything. The Guidebook 
tells you your rights. 

• Health-care costs. 
Health insurance and medi- 
cal care can be two of the 
biggest expenses you'll 
have. The Guidebook ex- 
plores both flexible spend- 



ing accounts and health sav- 
ings accounts. It's possible, 
for example, to set up a FSA 
with pre-tax dollars to pay 
for day care once you go 
back to work. 

• Saving for college 
while you save for your own 
retirement. Rule of thumb: 
The kids can take out school 
loans, but you'll need money 
m place for retirement. 

• Work versus day care. 
Is it really cheaper to give 
up your job and stay home 
to save on child-care costs? 
According to the Guide- 
book, day care could cost 
you upward of $30,000 per 
year, depending where you 
live, but if you don't keep 
working you'll also be giv- 
ing up benefits, including a 
retirement plan. And what 
about when you want to re- 
turn to work but can't get 
back at the same salary level 
as when you left? 

• Money-saving tips for 
every stage of your child's 
life. From making a will and 
setting up a guardian in case 
something happens to you, 
to the real costs of moving to 
the suburbs to save money 
and the differences between 
a baby sitter and an au pair 
~ it's all there. 

This book is loaded with 
information for all parents, 
not just new ones. 

David Uffington regrets that he 
cannot personally answer reader 
questions, but will incorporate 
them into his column whenever 
possible. Write to him in care oj 
King Features Weekly Service, 
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 
32853-6475, or send e-mail to col- 
umnreply@gmail.com . 

© 2009 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



20 Projects In Just 20 Minutes 



Since every dollar counts 
these days, homeowners 
need sensible home im- 
provement products that can 
help increase the value of 
their homes without break- 
ing the bank. 

Fypon to the rescue. 

"Easy-to-install urethane 
and PVC products can en- 
hance the interior and ex- 
terior of any home without 
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sweat" 20-minute home im- 
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supports in a finished base- 
ment with PVC Column 
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room. 

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cabinets to present a more 
finished look in the bath- 
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1 1 . Create a unique win- 
dow treatment by hanging a 
pair of brackets on either side 
of a window. Insert a dowel 



rod through the brackets and 
drape with fabric for a fast 
and easy decorative window 
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ways with a keystone. 

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ture-resistant urethane pi- 
lasters on both sides of your 
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opening between two rooms 
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18. Top off a standard 



bookshelf with an impres- 
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19. Add a scalloped 
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Cutting Costs? How To Get The Best Deal On Furniture 



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(ARA) - You may be 
able to get a few more years 
out of your car, and you've 
definitely decided to put off 
purchasing a big-screen, 
high-def plasma TV. But 
sometimes buying furniture 
is not a luxury, it's a neces- 
sity. 

When you see ads for 
no-interest financing deals, 
you may feel better about 
replacing your decrepit din- 
ing room set or ditching that 
couch that threatens to col- 
lapse every time the kids 
sit on it. There certainly are 
good deals available in a re- 
cession, and you shouldn't 
put off buying something 
you really need. But the 
concept of "buyer beware" 
becomes even more impor- 
tant in an economy where 
furniture dealers are all 
equally desperate for your 
dollars, but not all equally 
ethical in how they go about 



getting you to hand over 
your money. 

Brad Haas , a furniture ex- 
pert with manufacturer Car- 
rington Court Direct, offers 
a few tips to make sure you 
get the best possible deal on 
furniture in an economic 
downturn, when it's more 
important than ever to get 
the most for your money. 

Consider these issues 
when evaluating a furniture 
purchase: 

* Is shipping free? Prob- 
ably not. Shipping furniture 
can be costly and no store 
can afford to eat that cost. 
If they're advertising free 
shipping, most likely the 
shipping costs have been 
rolled into the sales price. 
Calculate the cost of ship- 
ping (usually 15 to 20 per- 
cent of the price) and deduct 
that amount from the asking 
price. 

* Beware of no interest/ 



no payments schemes. These 
plans usually are attached to 
lower-quality furniture that 
will last five years or less. 
By the time you're done 
paying it off, the furniture is 
worn out and you'll need to 
buy (and possibly finance) 
new furniture again. 

* Going-out-of-business 
sales are not always a good 
deal. There are companies 
that specialize in this type 
of business. The furniture 
may be marked up above 
retail prices before being 
"discounted," giving you a 
false perception that you're 
getting a good deal. 

Shopping online can be a 
good way to get great deals 
on furniture, Haas says. You 
can easily compare prices, 
save time and gas by not 
driving around to multiple 
stores, and you'll find a large 
selection of styles and fab- 



rics to choose from - proba- 
bly more than you would be 
able to find in your average 
furniture showroom. Keep 
in mind you won't see the 
piece until it's actually de- 
livered, so be sure to choose 
online merchants whose 
sites offer plenty of infor- 
mation and who emphasize 
customer satisfaction and 
service. 

Look for online sellers, 
where you'll be buying from 
and dealing directly with the 
manufacturer. You'll find 
more affordable prices and 
better customer service. 

"In a down economy, 
many people may be reluc- 
tant to buy furniture they re- 
ally need," Haas says. "But 
it is possible to find a good 
deal on quality furniture, if 
you know where and how to 
look for it." 

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Thursday, July 16, 2009 Tli« Qulncy Sua Pay 21 



Series Against Norwood Legion Started Tuesday 

Morrisette Makes AL 
Playoffs On Tiebreakers 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

A two-tiered tiebreaker 
between Morrisette, Wey- 
mouth and Holbrook Legion 
was needed to determine 
which two of these three 
teams would advance into 
this week's best two-out-of- 
three American Legion Dis- 
trict 6 East-West playoffs. 

All three teams from 
District 6 East concluded 
their season with 22 total 
points. Morrisette, at 11-11 
overall, and Holbrook at 
10-10-2, earned the coveted 
spots over Weymouth (11- 
8) based on two important 
criteria. Morrisette earned 
its spot based on its 1-1 re- 
cord against Weymouth and 
its +2 total runs advantage 
in games played; Holbrook 
advanced based on its 2-0 
record versus Weymouth 
during the regular season. 
Morrisette was seeded fourth 
out of five teams in District 
6 East playoff standings. 

Morrisette, as a result of 
making the American Legion 
playoffs for the first time 
since 2006, was scheduled 
to open its playoff series on 
Tuesday evening against the 
#2 seed Norwood Legion of 
District 6 West. 

These two teams were 
also scheduled to play 
Wednesday night (July 15) 
at 7:30 at Adams Field and 
will play again (if neces- 
sary) tonight at 7 p.m. in 
Norwood. 

Quincy Legion Post 95, 
the city's other American 
Legion baseball team, was 
knocked out of the playoff 
picture on Saturday follow- 
ing a late-season surge back 
into playoff contention, 
(^incy Legion finished 
their season at 9-13. 

"It was a little nerve- 
wracking waiting to see if 
we would get into the play- 
offs," said Morrisette's Bill 
Marchand. "We had to wait 
to the very last minute and 
then had to win the tiebreak- 
ers to eam our spot, but we 
did and now we are ready to 
challenge Norwood for the 
right to make it to the next 
round. This team has fought 
all season to get back into 
the playoffs and we have 



had to deal with plenty of 
ups-and-downs, but the kids 
have played hard all year 
and now we have a chance 
to make some noise. 

"We have played Nor- 
wood before in the playoffs 
and we know that they are a 
very strong team. They are 
usually a number one or two 
seed so it should be a chal- 
lenge to say the least. They 
have played well all year 
and their pitching should be 
well rested. We are going to 
have to move some people 
around and make adjust- 
ments on the fly because we 
really have exhausted our 
pitching staff just trying to 
get all of our games in." 

At the start of last week 
Morrisette was sitting on an 
8-8 record. The team went 
3-3 to get to 11-11 overall. 
The week started with a 
19-2 win over Hyde Park, 
followed by a 9-1 win over 
Quincy Legion, a 10-0 loss 
to Quincy Legion, a 17-4 
loss to Jamaica Plain, a 10-3 
loss to Weymouth and a huge 
13-8 win over Braintree. 

In the Braintree game, 
Morrisette's Kevin Magoon 
and Ricky Salvucci com- 
bined to pitch their team 
into the playoffs. Salvucci, 
pitching in his first game 
of the season, threw three 
innings, allowing one hit, 
striking out two batters and 
allowing one run. 

The offense got on the 
scoreboard early, scoring 
five runs in the opening 
frame. Leadoff hitter Danny 
Russell singled; Colin Ryan 
singled; Matt Rodriquez 
walked; Salvucci drove in 
Russell with a sacrifice fly; 
Joe Vialpando singled scor- 
ing Ryan; John Ainsley had 
a RBI single and Ryan Louis 
capped off the scoring with 
another run-scoring single. 

In the second inning, Sal- 
vucci singled and scored on 
a Vialpando RBI double. 

Braintree ( 1 2-7) did come 
back to take a 7-6 lead in the 
fifth iiming, but Morrisette 
rallied back on the heels of 
a huge bottom of the fifth 
inning to take the lead for 
good. John Ainsley got it 
started with a walk; Louis 



walked; Devin Hudson tied 
the game with a RBI single; 
Greg Nelson walked to re- 
load the bases and Russell 
snapped the 7-7 tie with a 
big two-run single. Ryan 
drove home the team's tenth 
run with a sacrifice fly. 

"It was a big win, we re- 
ally needed it," said March- 
and. "Ricky did a great job 
pitching for us when we 
needed a fresh arm and the 
offense came up clutch. It 
ended up being a very im- 
portant win. It got us into 
the playoffs." 

Earlier in the week Mor- 
risette and Quincy Legion 
played a double-header at 
Adams Field. Morrisette 
took Game One , 9- 1 , behind 
the solid pitching of Alex 
Tragellis (seven innings. 

Cont'd On Page 22 




QUINCY YOUTH SOCCER U12 (.ikl.s. Uk tnder-12 girls' team finLshed its season b> 
making the quarterfinals of the South Shore Soccer League. Members of the team included, 
front row from left: Alyxandrea Patey, Gabriela Jerahian, Kiera Clifford and Marissa McGue. 
Middle row: Molly Kate Cannon, Bridget Hobin, Jessica Phelan, Kara Carchedi and Skyla 
Shaheen. Back row: Ariana Paulo, Alison Coleman, Sabrina Lofstedt, Vanessa Triffone. Angela 
McDonald, Julia O'Donnell and Coach LarT>' Carchedi. 

Quincy Sun photo/Lam Carchedi 




Round 
Ball 

^BASKETBALL CAMP 

For Boys & Girls 

Instruction & Games 

August 3-7 Ages 7-11 

August 10-14 Ages 9-1 6 

at 

North Quincy High School 
9:00am - 2:00pm 

For Brochure call Ted Stevenson 
617-328-3409 





15th Annual North Quincy Red Raider Football 

Alumni Golf Tournament 

www.northquincyfootball.com 

For the Benefit of the NQHS Scholarship Fund 

Hyannis Golf Club - June 30, 2009 

In Memory of Coach Robert "Knobby" Nolan -- 2009 Honoree 

- SPONSORS AND CONTRIBUTORS - 

Attorney David P. Mahoney, 15 Foster Street, Quincy, MA 02169, 617-770-0000 - Dave Mahoney 

Baker, Braverman & Barbadoro, P.C, Attorneys at Law, 50 Braintree Hill Park, Suite 108, Braintree, MA 02184, 

781-848-9610, www.bbbs-law.com - Paul Barbadoro 

Consumer Home Mortgage Corporation of America, 60 McGrath Highway, Quincy, MA 02169, 617-773-2100, 

jburns(2>consumerhomemortgage.com - Jean Bums 

Edward Jones Investments^, Making Sense of Investing, 800-671-9835 - Strve Hopkins 

Furry Friends of Squantum, Dog Walking and Pet Sitting, 617-599-2552 - GregKelleter 

Harrington Bros Corp., Sheet Metal and HVAC Contractors, 1043 Turnpike Street, Stoughton, MA 02072, 

781-341-1999 - Steve Perrone 
In Loving Memory of Anthony Pollara - Lesley and Ron Pollara 
In Loving Memory of John Hemphill, NQHS Football Captain 1969- 1970 Season - The Hemphill Family 

John M. Murphy, D.M.D., Family Dentistry, 464 Granite Avenue, Milton, MA 02186, 617-696-3900, 

www.jmprhydmd.com - Jack Murphy 

Justice of the Peace Susan Z. Stamos, www.JustPeace 1 (2)msn.com, 617-833-7624 ' Sue Stamos 

Koch Club - Dick Koch 

Louis & Company, Inc., Advertising & Marketing, 222 Forbes Road, Suite 204, Braintree, MA 02184, 
. 781-356-5830 (o), 617-842-7491 ©) - Lou Truhtano, President 

Mullaney's Variety, 205 West Squantum Street, Quincy, MA 02171, 617-328-0240 - Jim Mullaney 

NQHS Class of 73 36 Years United! - The Class of 73 

NQHS Class of 73 Trivu: Who is Mr. Phillips?* - Mark "Mul" Mulvaney 

Presidents Golf Course, 357 West Squantum Street, No. Quincy, MA 02171, 617-328-3444, www.presidentsgc.com 

- Don Small, PGA. 

ScoTTY Whitelaw, 2008 NQHS Football Honoree - NQHS Alumni 

Stamos & Stamos Realtors, 747 East Squantum Street, Squantum, MA 02171, 617-328-9400, 

www.stamosandstamosrealtors.com - Sue Stamos, Realtor 

Team Fitness of Franklin, 100 Franklin Drive, Franklin, MA 02038, 508-541-8330, www.teamfitnessfranklin.com 

- Bob Flynn, Owner 

The Flynn Family - John Flynn 

The Schaetzl Family - Billy Schaetzl 

The White Family, 430 Beale Street, Walter 71, Mary 72, Theresa 73, Michael 74, John 79, Linda '84 - John White 

Welcome All NQHS Alumni; Thanks for Joining Us! - Bill Shea 

Wheatstone Engineering & Consulting Company, Inc., 220 Forbes Road, Braintree, MA 02184, 781-380-0600 

- Jim Murphy, L.S.P., Principal 

20o6 NQHS Football i\LUMNi Honoree Billy Carroll, Wc Miss You! - The Whole Gang 

'Answer to trivia question: Atlantic Jr. High Football Coach 

-THANKS- 

Bun and Roni Bray, Tom Donovan, James Ducey, Edward Jones Investments - Steve Hopkins, Footjoy and Tltlcist - John 
Flynn, Joanne Guilfoy, Bcrnie Holleran, Michael Keith, Paul Lippcns, Ruth Mewis, Bob and Liz Morton, Mullaney's Variety 

- Jim Mullaney, Mark Mulvaney, Sr., Mark Mulvaney, Jr., Lesley and Ron Pollara, Presidents Golf Course - Don Small, 
P.G.A., Colin Riley, Sue Stamos, The Quincy Sun, Theresa White, and everyone who suppons this terrific fiindraising event. 

-SPECIAL THANKS- 

Lou Trubiano 

- 2009 NQHS SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS - 

Ronald Barden, Jillian O'Brien, Catherine O'ConncU, Joseph Vialpando 



Page 22 Tlie Quincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2009 




Morrisette Makes AL 
Playoffs On Tiebreakers 



QUINCY YOUTH SOCCER U14 TEAM: Members of Quincy Youth Soccer's Under-14 travel 
soccer team included: Front row from left, Alyssa Lydon, Roisin Henry, Callie Cabral, Brian- 
na Foley, Carina Montrond-Silveira and Olivia Wallace. Second row: Elizabeth Kelly, Lauren 
Campo, Samantha Miner, Jessica O'Donovan, Meredith Durham, Shannon McCleary, Jaclyn 
Scuzzarella, Stephanie DiPietro and Haley McKay. Back row: Coach Howie Cabral and Assis- 
tant Coach Derek McCleary. Missing from photo: Arianna Viscione. 

Team's Overall Record Was 6-1-1 

QYS U-14 Girls Dl Team 
Finishes Successful Season 



The Quincy Youth Soc- 
cer Under-14 Division 1 
girls travel team recently 
completed a successful 2009 
spring season in the South 
Shore Soccer League. The 
team ended the regular sea- 
son with a record of 6-1-1 
and advanced all the way to 
the Final Four of the SSSL 
playoffs. 

Division 1 in the SSSL 
provides the highest level 
of competition and this 
year, included teams from 
Brockton, Bridge water. East 
Bridge water, Weymouth, 
Braintree, Easton and Han- 
son. The team's 2009 record 
was a considered a great ac- 
complishment as the girls 
improved on last year's 
record when they finished 
with two ties playing in the 
Under- 13 league. 

This year during SSSL 
play, Quincy scored 29 goals 
and held opponents to just 
14. The team was involved in 
many exciting games includ- 
ing a double overtime game 
in the league playoffs against 
East Bridgewater in which 
Quincy played for most of 
the game with only one sub- 
stitute because of injuries. 



The spring season fol- 
lowed what was also a 
successful indoor season 
(winter) at the South Shore 
Sports Center where Quincy 
finished with a 6-2 record, 
scoring 72 goals to their op- 
ponents' 21. 

Quincy, throughout the 
season, displayed skill and 
athleticism with many play- 
ers playing multiple posi- 
tions on the pitch in the 
same game. In addition, ev- 
ery player on the team had at 
least one goal or assist and 
on occasion, game officials 
commented that they had not 
seen as talented a team from 
Quincy in quite some time. 

"The girls' commitment 
to soccer this year was sim- 
ply outstanding," said Coach 
Howard Cabral. "Through- 
out our winter training 
and spring practices, they 
worked extremely hard and 
really enjoyed themselves. 
They were probably the best 
group that I've had the plea- 
sure of coaching in my years 
with Quincy Youth Soccer." 

Added Coach Derek 
McCleary: "This team has 
developed a great deal of 
chemistry over the years. 



Their much improved skill 
level this year coupled with 
their tireless work ethic and 
commitment to training re- 
sulted in one of the strongest 
Quincy travel teams I have 
been involved with over the 
last 10 years. It was a plea- 
sure watching their success 
this season in a very competi- 
tive division and they should 
all hold their heads high for 
such a great season." 

Team members includ- 
ed Callie Cabral, Lauren 
Campo, Stephanie DiPietro, 
Meredith Durham, Brianna 
Foley, Roisin Henry, Liz 
Kelly, Alyssa Lydon, Shan- 
non McCleary, Haley McK- 
ay, Samantha Miner, Carina 
Montrond-Silveira, Jess 
O' Donovan, Jaclyn Scuzza- 
rella, Arianna Viscione and 
Olivia Wallace. 

The team would also like 
to thank Dana Santilli, co- 
ordinator of the QYS travel 
program, for his constant 
support. Without his help 
with fundraising, arranging 
practice space and working 
with the SSSL on the team's 
behalf, the season would not 
have been as successful as it 
was. 



Team Finished Week 3-1 



Quincy Babe Ruth 15- Year 
Olds Reach District Finals 



The Quincy Babe Ruth 
15-year old team finished 
last week with an impres- 
sive 3-1 record in its Babe 
Ruth District tournament to 
reach the tournament finals 
to be held later this month. 

Quincy lost its opener 
to Weymouth (4-3), but 
stormed back to capture 
wins over Duxbury (2-1), 
Kingston (14-7) and Wey- 
mouth (19-10) to cam their 
trip to the district finals. 

Quincy def. Weymouth, 
19-10 

Last Saturday io their re- 



match against Weymouth, 
Quincy 's bats heated up 
and produced 19 hits and 
19 runs. The pitching com- 
bination of Joe Alibrandi 
and Lukas McDonough 
held Weymouth's offense in 
check and Alibrandi helped 
out his own cause with four 
hits. 

Adam Nazzaro (single, 
double, triple), Hm Liuzzo 
and Justin Coscia (each 
with a single, double), \fike 
Stille, Sam Lawlor and Tor- 
rey Gustin (each with two 
singles), Lukas McDonough 



(triple) and Dan Higgins 
(single) all produced at the 
plate for (^ncy against 
Weymouth. 

Andrew Rogantino, Tim 
Liuzzo and Mike Stille 
played strong games de- 
fensively for Quincy Babe 
Ruth. 
Quincy def. Kingston, 14-7 

On July 10 against Kings- 
ton, Quincy finished with 15 
hits and 14 runs. Adam Naz- 
zaro threw seven innings 
(complete game), dominat- 
ing Kingst(Mi and helping 
Cont'd On Paxe 23 



Cont'd From Page 21 

three hits, three strike- 
outs). Salvucci (2-for-4), 
Vialpando (2-for-3, BB). 
Ainsley (2-for-3, BB) and 
Ryan (3-for-5) paced the of- 
fensive attack. 

Quincy Legion's Kevin 
Keith shut down Morrisette 
in Game Two, helping his 
team to a 10-0 win. 

At the beginning of the 
week Morrisette demolished 
Hyde Park Legion 19-2. 
Ryan Louis earned his fifth 
victory of the year on the 
mound, allowing two hits, 
striking out five batters and 
allowing two runs. 

Salvucci (3-for-3, HR, 
four RBI, four runs scored), 



Rodriquez (2-for-3, three 
runs, two RBI) and Louis 
(2-for-3, HR, two runs, five 
RBI) did most of the dam- 
age at the dish for Morrisette 
Legion. 

"The regular season was 
a grind on not just our team 
but all of District 6 East," 
added Marchand. "The rainy 
weather put all of the teams 
in tough spots and we are 
really happy that we won 
enough games to advance. 
It is a true testament to the 
quality of players we had 
this season. Our veterans, 
including Salvucci , Vialpan- 
do, Tragellis, stepped up and 
our younger players such as 
Ainsley, Louis, Rodriquez, 
Magoon, Joe Edgeriy, Ryan 



and Russell played great. We 
will see how it plays out, but 
we are confident the series 
will be very competitive." 

Notes: Salvucci finished 
the regular season with 
a .583 batting average, a 
.630 on-base percentage, 30 
RBI and 22 runs scored... 
Quincy Legion Post 95 fin- 
ished their season with wins 
over Cohasset (13-9) and 
Braintree (9-8)... Against 
Cohasset, Keith Morreale 
and Scott Warwick both 
went 3-for-4 with two runs 
scored and two RBI. Kevin 
Keith earned the win on the 
rnound... Billy Kiley drove 
in the winning run with 
a three-run triple against 
Braintree. 




NOREEN DeAMICIS (left) tries out one of the new tandem kayaks with boatuig instructor 
Nate Schow at the Quincy Recreation Department's William F. Ryan Boating and Sailing facil- 
ity at Black's Creek. 

QRD Adds Two Tandem 
Kayaks To Fleet 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department (QRD) an- 
nounced Tuesday that two 
tandem kayaks have been 
added to the existing fleet at 
the William F. Ryan Boat- 
ing and Sailing facility at 
Black's Creek. 

The popular summer pro- 
gram, located at Merrymount 
Park, has instructional and 
recreational programs in 
rowing, canoeing, kayaking 
and sailing seven days each 
week during July and Au- 
gust. 

According to Barry J. 
Welch, Director of Recre- 



ation, the new tandem kay- 
aks are a great addition to 
the fleet. 

"They are versatile, stable 
and comfortable and ideal 
for families and beginner 
paddlers." 

Participants may still reg- 
ister for the full-package of 
summer programs for both 
children and adults. Instruc- 
tional programs are offered 
in all boats under a variety 
of memberships for family, 
youth and adult. There are 
also value priced canoe and 
kayak memberships for rec- 
reational use of canoes and 



kayaks. 

The natural saltwater la- 
goon where Furnace Brook 
meets the sea is an ideal lo- 
cation, which is safe and re- 
markably beautiful for this 
activity. The entrance to the 
facility is through Merry- 
mount Park and the Pageant 
Field parking area. There is 
ample parking in the lot at 
the east end of Merrymount 
Park. 

Registration can be done 
in person at the facility and 
more information is avail- 
able by calling the QRD at 
617-376-1397. 



72"** Quincy Bay Race 
Week Starts July 23 



The 72°^ Quincy Bay 
Race Week (QBRW) will 
start in earnest on July 23 
with the "Inside Line" at the 
Quincy Yacht Qub. 

This race features chil- 
dren from 8 to 16 from Bos- 
ton and South Shore towns 
of Quincy, Marshfield, Sci- 
tuate, Norwell, Hingham, 
Hull, Weymouth, Hanover, 
Braintree and Plymouth. 
Registration for the "Inside 
Line"-a race featuring Turn- 
abouts, Optis, 420s, Lasers 
and >\^idgens-is scheduled to 
begin at 1 1 :30 ajn., with the 



race beginning at 1:30 p.m. 

Contact Kevin Madden 
at kjm45@aoI.com for ad- 
ditional information on the 
"Inside Line." 

The "Outside Line," 
(Thunderbirds, Husders, 
210s and Rhodes 19), a race 
for sailors older than 1 8 starts 
July 25 and continues July 
26 off Quincy Yacht Qub. 
The racecourse will be in be- 
tween Quincy 's Long Island 
Bridge and Peddocks Island. 
Racing is scheduled to start 
at 1 :45 p jn. each day. 

Also on July 26, a ma- 



rine parade along the Quin- 
cy shoreline will begin at 
1:30 p.m. from the Town 
River Yacht Qub and end at 
Squantum Yacht Qub. This 
year's marine parade theme 
is "Movies," and the best 
viewing of the marine parade 
from onshore will be along 
WoIIaston Beach. 

Trophies will be awarded 
to QBRW sailors at the con- 
clusion of the marine parade. 

Visit QBRW's website 
at www.qbrwa.org for addi- 
tional informati(Hi and regis- 
tration forms. 



rhursda;, July 16, 200* Tiim Qttincy Sim Page 23 



Team Finished Week 3-1 

Quincy Babe Ruth 

15- Year Olds Reach 

District Finals 



Cont 'd From Page 22 

to keep Quincy 's relief core 
intact. 

Tim Liuzzo, Ryan Do- 
herty and Nazzaro (each 
with three singles), Mike 
Stille (single, double), Zach 
Steams (two singles), Ed 
McDonough (single) and 
Lukas McDonough (single) 
led the Quincy offensive at- 
tack. 
Quincy def. Duxbury, 2-1 

Last Wednesday versus 
Duxbury, Quincy won 2-1 
in nine innings. Tim Liuzzo 
(seven innings, three hits, 
six strikeouts) and Lukas 
McDonough (two innings, 
hit, six strikeouts) pitched 
outstanding against Dux- 
bury, carrying Quincy to a 
huge win in district play. 

Quincy scored its first 
run of the game on a field- 
er's choice by Danny Hig- 
gins and the team plated 
the game winning run in the 
ninth inning when Joe Ali- 
brandi tripled and scored on 
a Mike Stille base hit. 

Adam Nazzaro had a sin- 
gle for Quincy 's only other 
hit of the game. 



Weymouth def. Quincy, 4-3 

Quincy had a tough start 
to their week as Weymouth 
rallied to score two runs in 
the bottom of the .seventh in- 
ning to win 4-3. 

Joe Alibrandi and Lukas 
McDonough pitched well 
for Quincy in the tough-luck 
loss. 

Mike Stille (two singles), 
Tim Liuzzo, Sam Lawlor, 
Ed McDonough and Zach 
Steams (each with a single) 
paced the Quincy offense. 

Ryan Doherty, Adam 
Nazzaro and Bob Kozlowski 
all played well defensively 
for Quincy. 

The 15-year old roster 
includes Dan Higgins, Jus- 
tin Coscia, Bob Kozlows- 
ki, Adam Nazzaro, Zach 
Steams, Joe Alibrandi, Sam 
Lawlor, Ed McDonough, 
Lukas McDonough, Torrey 
Gustin, James Dunn, Ryan 
Doherty, Tim Liuzzo, An- 
drew Rogantino and Mike 
Stille. The coaching staff 
includes Tony Alibrandi, 
George Higgins, Dick Lom- 
bardi, Ray Coscia and Tom 
Nazzaro. 



July 23-30 At Adams Field 

Quincy Babe Ruth 

To Host 13- Year Old 

State Tournament 



Quincy Babe Ruth will 
play host to the 1 3-Year Old 
Massachusetts State Tourna- 
ment, a double-elimination 
event, on July 23-30 at Ad- 
ams Field. 

The toumey, featuring 
eight teams (seven district 
winners and the host team 
Quincy) from Cape Cod to 
the North Shore, will open 
on Thursday, July 23 with 
games scheduled for 5:30 
p.m. and 8 p.m. Games on 
Friday, July 24 will also be 



held at 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. 

On Saturday, July 25 
games will be held at 1 1 a.m., 
2 p.m., 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. 

The champion of this 
double-elimination tourna- 
ment will advance to the 
New England Regional 
Toumament held later this 
summer. 

Additional toumament 
information, including game 
schedules and team rosters, 
will be published when they 
become available. 




THANKS, MAJOR - A group of local floor hockey players 
present a Quincy Hockey Jersey to Major Doug Jones (cen- 
ter), formerly of the Quincy Salvation Army, as a farewell gift. 
Major Jones and his wife, Major Linda Jones, were recently 
transferred to Manchester, CT, Doug Jones played floor hock- 
ey at the Salvation Army for the past several years. Making 



the presentation are (from left): Vinny Ciaccio, Frank Scanian, 
Dave Blaton, Michael ChrLstiani. Craig Wright, Kevin .Mahon- 
ey, Patrick Mulkem. Bill Thomas and Bob Bosworth. Missing 
from photo are players Scott Smith and John Kelly. 

John Kellv Photo 



Event To Be Held Aug, 1-2 



25 Quincy Residents To Ride 
in 30th Pan-MA Challenge 



Home Opener Scheduled For July 

Quincy Militia 



On August 1-2, 25 resi- 
dents of Quincy will be riding 
in the 30"' annual Pan-Mas- 
sachusetts Challenge (PMC), 
the nation's pioneer chanty 
bike-a-thon that raises more 
money than any other athletic 
fundraising event in the coun- 
try. The 25 Quincy riders will 
be among the more than 5, OCX) 
cyclists who will ride with the 
collective goal of raising mil- 
lions of dollars for lifesaving 
cancer research and care for 
adult and pediatric cancer pa- 
tients at Dana-Farber Cancer 
Institute through its Jimmy 
Fund. 

PMC riders are between 
13 and 85 years of age; many 
riders are seasoned cyclists 
or tri-athletes, while others 
are PMC weekend warriors, 
having trained for this event 
alone. Doctors ride along side 
their patients; friends and 
family members ride in honor 



of loved ones lost to, or bat- 
tling, cancer. Nearly 300 can- 
cer survivors will ride to give 
back and give thanks for be- 
ing given a second chance. 

"Even in a down economy, 
people are making a commit- 
ment to fundraise and ride in 
the PMC in order to help raise 
money for cancer research," 
said Billy Starr, PMC founder 
and executive director. "Can- 
cer doesn't stop because of a 
recession and neither do PM- 
Cers." 

Since 1980, the PMC has 
raised more than $240 million 
for cancer research and care at 
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 
and, last year, the PMC gave 
100% of every rider-raised 
dollar directly to the Jimmy 
Fund. The PMC generates 
more than 50% of the Jimmy 
Fund's annual revenue and is 
Dana-Farber 's largest single 
contributor. 



The PMC is a fully sup- 
ported bike-a-thon-with food 
and water stops, mechanical 
and medical assistance, lug- 
gage transjx)rtation and lodg- 
ing-that runs through 46 cities 
and towns across the state. 

Cyclists are required to rise 
between $ 1 ,000 and $4,200 to 
ride in the PMC; yet, the aver- 
age PMCer raises more than 
$6,000. This commitment to 
the fundraising portion of the 
PMC journey is a testament to 
rider's dedication to the cause 
and their belief in the PMC 
mission. 

To become a virtual nder 
or make a financial contribu- 
tion to a rider from Quincy, 
visit www.pmc.org and plug- 
in their eGiftlD or call (800) 
WE-CYCLE. Checks can 
be made payable to PMC, 
77Fourth Ave, Needham, MA 
02494. 

The following is a list of 



the 25 Qumcy nders m this 
year's 30"' annual P.MC: 

Jennifer Bowser: JB(W52 
(eGiftID); Tracy Cnstiani, 
TC0153;RyanDice,RD0121; 
Robin Franceschini. RF0062; 
Patncia Fraser. PF(X)60; Do- 
menic Giammarco, DG0131; 
Thomas Hedihy. THOIOO; 
Enc Horsman, EH(X)67; Wen- 
dy Kingsley. WK0035. Al La- 
Belle. AL0113; Andy Lamb. 
AL0127; .Meghan BrinJen 
.Marcella. MB03I5. Rich- 
ard Marcella. R.M0201. Paul 
.McCarthy. PM0004, Patrick 
.McDermott, P.M0()18; Hugh 
McLaughlin. HM0045; .Mary- 
ellen McLaughlin. .\1M0443 
Theresa Mulcahy. T.M0123 
.Michael O'Connor. .MO0073 
Elliot Place. EP0051; Jen- 
nifer Savoie, JS0356; Kevin 
Smith, KS0198; Knsha Suy- 
dan. KS0188; Karen Walsh, 
KW0074 and Annmane 
White, AW0008. 



18 at 7 p.m. 

Open Inaugural Season With 



Win 



Football is a sport usu- 
ally reserved for the fall and 
early winter months, but this 
summer, fans of the great- 
est game on turf, now have 
the chance to come out and 
watch a new team in town. 

The Quincy Militia, an 
expansion franchise in the 
49-year-old semi-pro East- 
em Football League (EFL), 
opened its inaugural season 
last Sunday with a game 
against the Hyde Park Semi- 
noles, and right away, the 
Militia made it a point to 
show the rest of the EFL, 
that although they may be 
the new team in town, they 
mean business. 



The Militia cruised to 
a 32-22 victory over Hyde 
Park behind a big game on 
the ground by E)olan Read 
(four carries, 144 yards, 
three TDs) and solid defense 
from Chris Dolbeare (seven 
tackles, fumble recovery) 
and Evan DeCastro (nine 
tackles, INT). 

"The whole team, on 
both sides of the ball, never 
gave up and when we were 
down, at halftime, they came 
out fighting to take the lead 
and never looked back," said 
Militia Head Coach Vaughan 
Driscoll. "True commitment, 
unity and hard nose play!" 

With their season-opening 



victory in the books, the Mi- 
litia will be looking to make 
it two wins in a row (the 
team is scheduled to play a 
12 week/iO-game schedule) 
when they take to the field at 
Quincy 's Veterans Memorial 
Stadium this Saturday night 
(July 18) at 7 p.m. to play 
against the Brockton Buc- 
caneers. 

Gates open at 5:30 p.m. 
and admission is $5. Kids 
under the age of 10 are ad- 
mitted for free. 

This summer, the Mili- 
tia joined forces with the 
EFL as part of a four-team 
expansion plan, joining the 
Hyde Park Seminoles, the 



Bridgewater Gladiators and 
the Seacoast (Exeter, NH) 
Vipers as new teams in the 
league. EFL holdovers the 
Randolph Oilers, the Brock- 
ton Buccaneers, the Charles- 
town Townies and the Clin- 
ton Irish Blizzards make up 
the reminder of the eight- 
team league. 

Driscoll (GM/HC), Kevin 
Callahan (defensive coach). 
Mark Cipriano (wide receiv- 
er coach). Rick Gibson (as- 
sistant WR coach) and Tom 
Donahue (owner) coach the 
Militia and many of the cur- 
rent players are alumni of ei- 
ther Quincy or North Quincy 
High School. 



The Militia's 2009 sched- 
ule is as follows: 

7/18/09: Brockton Bucca- 
neers @ Veterans Memorial 
Stadium, 7 p.m. (gates open 
at 5:30 p.m.) 

7/25/09: Clinton Irish 
Blizzard @Fuller Field, 
Clinton, 7 p.m. 

8/1/09: Chariestown 

Townies (a Chariestown HS, 
7 p.m. 

8/8/09: Bridgewater 

Gladiators ©Veterans Me- 
morial Stadium. 7 p.m. 

8/15/09: Bye Week 

8/23/09: Seacoast Vipers 
@ Exeter HS, Exeter, NH, I 
p.m. 

8/29/09: Randolph Oilers 



(§ Veterans Memorial Sta 
dium,7 p.m. 

9/5/09: Clinton Insh Bliz 
zard (a Veterans Memona 
Stadium. 7 p.m. 

9/12/09: ByeW^ek 

9/19/09: Seacoast Viper; 
(ft Veterans Memorial Sta 
dium.7 p.m. 

9/26/09: Brockton Bliz 
zards @Bridgewater-Rayn 
ham HS,7 p.m. 

10/3/09: Make Up Date 

10/10/09: First- Rount 
Playoffs (TBA) 

10/17/09: Second-Roum 
Playoffs (TBA) 

10/24/09: EFL Champi 
onship Game (TBA) 



Page 24 Tbe QY&incy Syuh Thuniday, July 16, 2009 




HEALTH and FITNE95 





Doctor Recommended Tips For Avoiding HlNl 



DUN KIN' DONUTS recently hosted a day of fun and fund- 
raising to benefit the Alzheimer's Association at the new 195 
Newport Ave. location in Quincy. Along with event sponsors 
Soxology and Ski Market, Dunkin' helped raise funding and 
awareness for Alzheimer's research. From left to right are: 
Eric Eskander (Dunkin' Donuts franchisee), Lori Coburn 
(Alzheimer's Association), Jackye Colligan (Soxology) and 
Max Lane (former New England Patriot.) During the event, 
Dunkin' donated $1 of every ice coffee sold throughout the day 
to the Alzheimer's Association Memory Ride. 

Chris, IVudy Memorial 
Blood Drive July 21 



(ARA) - It's not unusual 
to see viruses make head- 
lines, but the recent threat 
of HlNl swine flu has cap- 
tured everyone's attention. 
On June 11, 2009, the Cen- 
ters for Disease Control and 
Prevention raised the HlNl 
pandemic status to level six, 
indicating an international 
pandemic. This change has 
left many people wonder- 
ing what they can do to keep 
themselves and their fami- 
lies healthy. 

Why is HlNl different 
than other viruses? Recently, 
scientists discovered that the 
2009 HlNl swine flu virus 
is more like the H5N1 avian 
flu than the historic 1918 
pandemic HlNl Spanish flu 
strain. That means previous 
flu vaccines are less effec- 
tive and extra precautions at 
home should take place. 

Dr. Roger Mazlen, an 
internist in Rosyln Heights, 
N.Y., with more than 30 
years of experience practic- 
ing internal medicine and 
nutrition, recently discussed 
the current swine flu out- 



breaks. 

Swine flu, or HlNl, 
was first isolated in a pig in 
1930, according to the CDC. 
The virus has demonstrated 
an ability to migrate from 
domestic pigs to humans. 
Mazlen says there are sever- 
al factors contributing to the 
current swine flu outbreak, 
including environmental, 
cultural and economic is- 
sues. 

"The current recession, 
loss of retirement funds, 
compromised nutrition, 
reduced exercise, obesity 
and other factors produce 
immune depression. A de- 
pressed immune system 
cannot fight off the invasion 
of viral and other pathogens 
that attempt to find a home 
to set up infections in our 
bodies," he says. 

In order to help you 
and your family during the 
2009/10 flu season, Mazlen 
offers these protection strat- 
egies: 

1 . Wash your hands fre- 
quently and stay hydrated 

"Frequent hand washing 



is a start. Also, lots of daily 
water helps to hydrate the 
body and assist the immune 
system," he says. 

2. Fish oil helps supports 
the immune system. 

Vitamin and mineral sup- 
plements add fortification, 
but Mazlen suggests adding 
fish oil because of its clini- 
cally-proven immune func- 
tion support. Fish oil blends 
are available as gel capsules 
or in liquid form at health- 
food stores and several dif- 
ferent brands are also avail- 
able at www.puritan.com. 

3. Use a prescription 
right away. 

Mazlen says that Tami- 
flu, the currently recom- 
mended prescription medi- 
cation used in flu and swine 
flu, is most effective when 
used within a few hours of 
the first viral symptoms. But 
swine flu, as reported by the 
CDC, has an ability to mu- 
tate within hours. Tamiflu 
may be effective for swine 
flu in the morning, and may 
be ineffecfive by the end of 



the day because of viral mu- 
tation. 

4. Skip the Echinacea 

When asked if the popu- 
lar herbal remedy Echinacea 
could be effective, Mazlen 
explains that studies have 
proved the product has min- 
imal effectiveness. He says 
he prefers a natural immune- 
stimulating product, which 
he has used with over 500 
pafients, including his fam- 
ily members. The product 
was originally developed in 
Russia, but is now made in 
the United States. Mazlen 
says he has had good results 
during the past years with 
patients fighting flu and oth- 
er infections. The product, 
Del-Immune V, is available 
at www.delimmune.com. 

Early measures to pro- 
tect health might be the key 
to minimizing potentially 
serious infections. "It is im- 
portant to have an immune 
defense strategy this year — 
the earlier the better," Ma- 
zlen concludes. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 



Daily Physical Activity Helps Lessen Severity Of Arthritis 



The American Red Cross 
has scheduled three blood 
drives in Quincy during 
July. 

On Tuesday, July 21 
from 2 to 8 p.m. the Houghs 
Neck Community Council 
will hold a blood drive in 
memory of Chris and Trudy 
Peter in St. Thomas Aquinas 
Hall, Darrow Street. 

The blood drive will also 
feature homemade goodies, 
childcare and an activity 
table. 

Also, a Quincy commu- 



nity blood drive is sched- 
uled Monday, July 27 and 
Tuesday, July 28 from 1 to 
7 p.m., at the Quincy Sons 
of Italy Social Center, 120 
Quarry St. 

Appointments for the 
blood drives are encour- 
aged. 

For an appointment, call 
1-800-GIVELIFE. 

All presenting donors 
during July and August 
will receive a coupon for a 
free carton of Friendly's Ice 
Cream. 



(ARA) - More than 46 
million people of all ages in 
the U.S. have arthrifis. A re- 
cent study from the Centers 
for Disease Control and Pre- 
vention found that arthritis 
is the nation's most common 
disability. 

The Arthritis Founda- 
tion has created a program. 
Let's Move Together, which 
is designed to inspire people 
to move every day to pre- 
vent or treat arthritis. Its 



Web site offers helpful dps 
for increasing movement, 
including: 

• Take a hike. Walking 
is one of the easiest, safest 
and most beneficial forms 
of exercise. It helps keep 
your weight in check and 
strengthens muscles, which 
reduces pressure on the 
knees and decreases pain. 
Walking just fast enough so 
that you're slightly short of 
breath is a good pace. The 
goal is to strengthen the 




for thgZIM^Qmtury 

by Steven A Brustin, DM.D. 

UNWAVERING COMMITMENT TO HYGIENE 

As public attention focuses staff's) health and safety. 



on a number of transmitted 
diseases, this office would like 
to affirm our unwavering com- 
mitment to stringent guidelines 
set forth by the Ocoipatlonal 
Safety and Health Adminis- 
tration, which ensure protec- 
tkxi from infectious diseases. 
These measures include steam 
autodavlng all Instmments and 
hand pieces after every use. 
Disposable items are used 
whenever appropriate. Dentists 
and staff wear protective eye- 



Our dental team Is trained 
to take universal precautions 
to protect our patients. Regu- 
lar exams to check the health 
of your teeth and gums and 
regular cleanings to remove 
your smije. Our goal is to pro- 
vide the very best dental care 
possible to our patients so that 
tfiey may achieve optimal den- 
tal health. We're located at 44 
Greenleaf Street, where our 
entire staff operates as a team. 
Call 617-47»«220 to schedule 



glasses and cfisposable gloves an appointment. We offer the 
during treatment. All areas that services of anestiieslology with 



are touched during the proce- 
dures are covered with a plastic 
wrap and changed after each 
patient to eUnrwnate cross con- 
tamination. All surfaces, chairs, 



a fully ti-alned and qualified an- 
estfiesiologist. Visit us on the 
web at www.quincydentist. 
com. 
P.S. fij) autodave is an in- 



puts, and units are thoroughly strument-deaning device that 

cfejnfected before and after utilizes steam under pressure 

every patient's use. Attention to Idll pathogens; ultrasonic 

to tfiese aend other measures deaners do so with saind- 

ensures our patients' (and our wave technology. 



VOICE 
FOR 

HEALTH 

by Dr. Gabrielle Freedman 

Chiropractor $ 





MANIPULATIVE, IN THE BEST SENSE OF THE WORD 



Much of chiropractic 
treatment involves "spinal 
manipulation," a high-velocity 
thrust that chiropractors deliver 
by hand. The intent is to move 
a joint beyond its normal range 
of motion but not beyond the 
range that it was designed to 
handle. This has the effect of 
providing more room for nerves 
to exit the spine, relaxing the 
muscles by virtue of stretching 
them suddenly, breaking up 
adhesions or scar tissue to 
keep the spine flexible, and/or 
moving displaced vertebrae back 
in place. To determine which 
vertebrae need to be adjusted, 
the chiropractor feels the joints 
of the spine while at rest and in 
motion. Once the determination 
is made, the manipulation is 
delivered manually using one of 
a number of specific techniques. 



Chiropractic care has been 
shown to be extremely effective 
in maintaining improved health 
and well-being through its ability 
to integrate several approaches 
to health which can easily be 
adopted into one's lifestyle. 
At FAMILY PRACTICE OF 
CHIROPRACTIC, your good 
health is our main concern. 
Call us at 617.472.4220 today 
to schedule an appointment. We 
are educated and trained in the 
detection and care of problems 
of the spinal column and in 
maintaining the delicate balance 
of the neck and spine. Our 
office is located at 112 McGrath 
Hwy., Quincy. Chiropractic is a 
scientifically sound and time- 
proven natural way to health. 

PS. Spinal manipulation has 
been documented as far back as 
the time of Hippocrates and the 



ancient Egyptians. 

www.freediTianchiro.com 



muscles in your legs and 
around your knees and hips. 

• Go for a spin. Station- 
ary cycling strengthens your 
heart, hips and knees ~ with 
less impact on joints than 
other forms of cardiovas- 
cular exercise, such as run- 
ning. For those new to sta- 
tionary cycling, start slowly 
with a five-minute session 
at a comfortable pace three 
times per day. 

• Make a splash. Using 
a combination of sooth- 
ing warm water and gentle 
movements helps increase 
joint flexibility and range of 
motion. Studies have shown 
aquatic-based exercise helps 
to restore and maintain mus- 
cle strength, relieve pain and 
stiffness and provide a com- 
munity support system for 
people with arthritis. Those 
looking to get started can 
explore the Arthritis Foun- 



dation Aquatic Program, 
which is offered in most 
major cities. 

• Go with the flow. Tai 
chi is a noncompetitive, 
self- paced system of gen- 
tle physical exercise and 
stretching. Participants in 
a tai chi program follow a 
series of postures or move- 
ments in a slow, graceful 
manner. Each posture flows 
into the next without paus- 
ing. Experts agree that tai 
chi may improve mobility, 
breathing and relaxation. 
Plus, the movements don't 
require deep bending or 
squatting, which makes it 
easier and more comfortable 
to learn. 

More information on the 
benefits of daily movement 
can be found online at www. 
letsmovetogether.org . 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 





AT HOME n- 

Elder CARE 

Gold Star Care for the Golden Years 

Bonded and Insured 
Reliable, Compassionate, Honest, Respectful 

State Certified CNA's & HNA's 
We offer 24/7 care and everything in between 

"There's No Place like Home." 
We Make it Possible to Stay There 

Braintree 781-843-7151 • Milton 617-698-9500 
www.athomeeldercareinc.com 



Thursday, .1 ulv 1 6 . 2009 The Qixincy Sia» Page 25 



Luau-Themed Dinner Friday 
To Benefit Music Ministry 

The music ministry of of $7.50 per person. 
Sacred Heart Parish, 386 Reservations are needed 

Hancock St., North Quincy, and can be made by calling 

will sponsor a benefit luau- the Sacred Heart rectory at 

themed dinner Friday, July 617-328-8666 by Wednes- 

17 at 6 p.m. in the parish day. July 15. 
cafeteria. Proceeds benefit the mu- 

The dinner will feature sic ministry's hosting of an 

appetizers,chicken and pork ecumenical, tri-state church 

dishes, vegetables, rice and children's choir workshop 

desserts. Cost is a minimum and festival next spring. 

Vacation Bible School At 
Squantum Christian Fellowship 



I^ELieiCN 

Quincy Point Congregational 



Free Screening Of 'Oh, God!' 
At HN Church Friday 



Squantum Christian Fel- 
lowship announces it will 
hold Vacation Bible School 
July 27-31. 

The theme of this year's 
school is "Croccxlile Dock." 
It will run from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon each day for children 
ages 4-11. 

The school will feature 
crafts, Bible songs, food and 
games. 

Kids will also experience 



a sense of purpose as they 
create fleecy Comfort Crit- 
ters for orphans in India. 
Kids will make one turtle to 
keep and one to give away. 

Parents are welcome to 
arrive before noon so they 
can enjoy the daily Firefly 
Finale with photos of their 
kids in action. 

For more information 
or to register, call 617-328- 
8771. 



Youth Chorus Aug. 10 -14 
At Wollaston First Baptist 

The First Baptist Church completed grades 1-7, may 



Sunday worship is at 10 
a.m. at the Quincy Point 
Congregational Church. 444 
Washington St. 

All are welcome. 

The Rev. Ann Rearick 
will preach. Her sermon title 
is "The Calming Presence of 
Jesus." 

Sherri Pitts will be the 
deacon of the day. Roxana 
Bajdechi will be the pianist. 

The church also an- 
nounces that the second an- 
nual "Worid of Music" sum- 
mer program will take place 
July 28-30. 

The program is hosted 
by the Quincy Point Con- 
gregational Church with 
instructors from the church 

First Church Of Squantum 

Sunday worship service follow the service in the par- 

at First Church of Squan- lor. 

turn, 164 Bellevue Rd.. Men's breakfast is held 

Squantum begins at 10 a.m. downstairs Saturdays at 8 

Coffee and refreshments a.m. in Fellowship Hall. 

Vacation Bible School 



and the Quincy Pomt Music 
Academy 

This year's theme is 
American Song; the experi- 
ence is open to child enter- 
ing grades 1-6. 

Activities include songs 
from American Songbook, 
stories, instrument making, 
demonstrations, music ap- 
preciation and movement. 

The grand finale on July 
30 will be a field trip to 
Symphony Hall. 

Cost is $30 per child and 
$15 for each additional sib- 
ling. 

Registration forms avail- 
able by calling the church 
office at 617-773-6424. 



Houghs Neck Congre 
gational Church. 310 Ma- 
net Ave . will present a free 
screening of the film Oh. 
GrW.' Friday. July 1 7 at 6.30 
p m in the church's Fellow 
ship Hall. 

All are welcome to at- 
tend 

Written by Larry Gelbart 
(M*A*S*H). O// God' fea- 



tures beloved comedian 
Cjeorge Burns as God. who 
chooses an ordinary super- 
market clerk as the unlikely 
messenger to deliver His 
word to a skeptical human 
race 

Admission is free, a 
snack bar offering soups, 
sandwiches and drinks 
opens at 6 p m 



Bethany Congregational 



Bethany Congregational 
Church 18 Spear St.. Quin- 
cy Center, will have a Sun- 
day Worship Service and 
Church Summer School at 
10 a.m. 

The Rev. William C. 
Harding will preach "Hver>- 
body Needs Somebody." 

Childcare will be avail- 
able for infants and tod- 



dlers. 

Following the worship 
service, there will be fel- 
lowship time in the Allen 
Parior 

Light refreshments will 
be served 

All are welcome 

The church is handi- 
capped accessible 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



of Wollaston announces a 
Harmony Youth Chorus will 
be held Aug. 10-14 from 9 
a.m. to noon. 

Boys and girls of all 
faiths and cultures who have 



register. Cost is $25 per 
child, $50 per family. 

Charles Dillingham from 
the Braintree Schools Music 
Department will direct the 
chorus again this summer. 



The First Baptist Church 
of Wollaston announces Va- 
cation Bible School will be 
held Aug . 10-14 from 9 a.m . 
to 2 p.m for children ages 3 
to 6. 



The theme of the bible 
school is Wildwood Forest. 

For more information or 
to register, call the church at 
(617)472-0824. 



Houghs Neck Congre- 
gational Church will hold 
its regular worship service 
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. 

All are welcome to attend 
the service. 

Pastor John Castricum 
will continue his summer 
sermon series on "The Fruits 



of the Spint." as outlined by 
Paul in the fifth chapter in 
his letter to the Galatians. 

Shiriey Pearson and Eri- 
ca Amato will serve for the 
Diaconate. 

A fellowship coffee hour 
will follow the service. 



Assemblies of God 



1 58Wishm^!rrSCQuincy 

phone; 773-9797 

Rev. Selwyn Bodley, Senior Pastor 

Sunday Worship: 10:30a.m. 

Christian Ed: Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

Youth Group: Sunday 6 p.m. 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A^Contemporary Worship 
m •Marriage & Family Group 
|S •International Fellowship 




Evangelical 



Catholic 



Catholic 



St. Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 617-773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 11:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 



ST. AGATHA CHURCH 
MILTON-QUINCY 

432 Adams Street 

Milton , MA 02 1 86 • 6 1 7-698-2439 

Schedule of Masses 

Saturday: 4:30pm 

Sunday: 7:30am, 9:00am (Family Mass), 

10:30am,* 12 noon, 5:00pm 

Weekday Masses: 7:00am and 9:00am 

' Interpreted ASL Mass every 2nd Sunday at 

12 noon & assistive devices for the hearing 

impaired available in Sacristy t)efore Masses. 

Handicapped Accessible, handicapped 

parking, elevator to Upper/Lower Churches 

air-conditioned 



Sacred Heart Church 

'A Roman Catholic Community walking together 

in Faith, Worship, Education and Sen/ice" 

386 Hancock St., North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617)328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) and 5pm 

12 noon at Star of Sea Church 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3 :45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



Catholic 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST 

44 School St., Quincy 

617-773-1021 
Weekend Mass Schedule 

Saturday, 4 p.m. 

Sunday, 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 

11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 

Weekday Masses 

Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. 
Handicapped Accessible 



St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 
SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 

Weel<day Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:00-3:30 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditioned 



Congregational 



HOUGH'S NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue 

617-479-8778 

www.hncong.org 

Sunday Service 9:30am 

Pastor John Castncun} 
"Fruits of the Spifif 



Congregational 



Saint Ann 's Church 

757 Hancock St., Wollaston 
617-479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. John J. Ronaghan 

Weekend Mass Schedule: 

Saturday 4:00 PM 
Sunday 7:00, 9:00, 11:30AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 
Handicapped Chairiift Available 




Methodist 



A 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

AOBealeSt. Wollaston 

617-773-3319 

10:30 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Or Susan Jarek-Glidden, Pastor 



Bethany 

Congregational 

Church 

Spear & Coddington Streets 
Quincy Center, 617-479-7300 

WWW.0UINCYBETHANYCHURCH.ORG 

Sunday Communion Worship 
Service & Church School at 10 am 

Rev. William C. Harding will 
preach 'Everybody Needs Somebody ' 

ALL ARE WELCOME! 
Child Care Available 

Fellowship Time in Allen Parlor 
Light Refreshments 

Church is handicapped accessible 



WOLLASTON 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 
United Church of Christ 

48 WinthropAve. • 617-773-7432 

Sunday Summer 
Worship 9 AM 

Rev. Dr. Mary Louise Gifford, 

Senior Pastor 



Squantum Christian Fellowship 

Got Questions'^ Come pursue answers 

Sunday Worship 10 a.m. 

with Pastor Michael Fehan 

Children's Teaching 10AM 

50 Huckins Ave. 

I Handicapped Accessible ■ 

Bible Discussion Groups 

Call 617-773-5878 or info @squa ntumcf.org 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd., Wollaston 

Rev. John Swanson. Pastor 

Sunday Worship Sen/ice 10 AM 

Church Office (617) 479-6661 



Nazarene 



Congregational 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington St . • 617-773-6424 

Worship and Church School 10 am 

Rev. Ann Suzedell, Pastor 

visit us at www.QPCC.org 



Wollaston Church 
of the Nazarene 

37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston ..^^ 

(617)472-5669 

On The Campus Of 

Eastern Nazarene College 

Pastor: Rev Fred. Fullerton 

Sunday Sen/ices 

8:30 am - Holy Communion 

9:45 am - Adult & Children's 

Sunday Sctiool 

11 a.m. - Blended Worship Service 

Come Worship with Us! 



EVANGELICAL 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

65 .New bur> Ave . .\ Quinc> M.A 02 r | 

Phone: f,l^K4^44-W 

Rev Franci.s Balla, Pastor 

Contemp<)rar> Worship: Sundas 10 30 am 

Web site: http:/ /wHw.eccquinc\.coiii 



Christian Science 



First Church of Christ, Scientist 

20 Greenleaf Street, Quincy 

617-472-0055 



Sunday Services 

and Sunday School 

10:30 a.m. 



Wednesday Evening 

Meetings - where 

testimonies of healing 

are shared 7;30 p.m. 



ALL ARE WELCOME! 




Salvationist 



THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St.. Quincy • 617-472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

BRASS BAND MUSIC 

6PM TEEN SALVATION MEETING 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 



Jewish 



Temple Beth EI 

1001 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-479-4309 

Shabbat services — 9:15 

Sunday - 9:00 

An egalitarian congregation 




To Advertise in this Directory ^ 
Call 617-471-3100 



Page 26 Tl&e Qulnoy Sim Thursday, July 16, 2009 




Obituaries 





William P. Donovan, 75 

Electrician, US Navy Veteran 



Mary Bridget Butts, 81 



Helen Tragellis, 81 

Social Worker 



A funeral Mass for Wil- 
liam P. "Bill" Donovan, 75, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
July 10 in Holy Trinity Par- 
ish, Most Blessed Sacra- 
ment Church. 

Mr. Donovan died July 5 
at Quincy Medical Center. 

Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in Quincy for most of 
his life and worked as an 
electrician for Local 103 for 
25 years, retiring in 1994. 
He was a United States 
Navy veteran of the Korean 
War. 

Mr. Donovan was a vol- 
unteer at the South Shore 
YMCA for 15 years and in 
his spare time enjoyed trav- 
eling and playing online 
poker and Keno. 

Husband of Eleanor M. 
"Ellie" (Love) Donovan; fa- 
ther of Michael P. Donovan, 
Sr. and his wife Michelle of 
Milton, Thomas A. Dono- 
van of CA and Tracy Kelley 
and her husband David, Sr. 




WILLIAM P. DONOVAN 

Donovan, Alison Donovan, 
Shea Donovan and Riley 
Donovan; great-grandfather 
of Kailyn and BreeAnn 
Donovan. 

He is also survived by 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment with Military 
Honors was in Mt. Wollas- 
ton Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations 
may be made to the YMCA 



of Quincy; grandfather of strong Kids Campaign, 79 

Michael Donovan, Jr. and Coddington St., Quincy, 

his wife Tracy, David Kel- MA 02169. 
ley, Jr., Patrick Kelley, Kelly 

Anthony Addonizio, 37 



Chef 



A private funeral service 
for Anthony Addonizio, 37, 
of Quincy, was conducted 
recently through the Mc- 
Donald Funeral Home, 
Marshiield. 

Mr. Addonizio died July 
3. 

Bom in Boston, he grad- 
uated from Quincy High 
School and worked as a chef 
in Quincy restaurants. He 
was also an avid Red Sox 
and Celtics fan. 



Husband of the late Kelly 
(Ridlon) Addonizio; father 
of Haley and Kylee Ad- 
donizio; son of Prisco and 
Janice Addonizio; brother 
of Annette Clang and her 
husband Ronald of Dux- 
bury, Tanya Player and her 
husband Kenneth of Brain- 
tree and Vincent Addonizio 
of Quincy. 

He is also survived by 
nieces and nephews. 




DON McCarthy 

Managing Director 



A Thought 
foR Tne ^£it( 

Many people strive to leave an estate 
made up of land, stock and bonds, 
and money in the bank. This can not 
be faulted for it is not fundamentally 
wrong, of course. .. But there is a dif- 
ferent kind of estate that never needs, 
or even can be probated. . . 

The very best estate is an 
honorable name, a good reputation, a record of righteous, 
useful living. . . A legacy of an honorable name, a legacy of 
profound respect for facts, a deep reverence for chai'acter, 
a thirst for wisdom, a dedication for work - is far more 
important and more meaningful than money itself. These 
things can NEVER be detrimental, while money and assets 
at times CAN be. 

A legacy of decency is NOT an impossible legacy. . . It is 
an estate ANY parent can leave to his or her children ... In 
the funeral home field we have witnessed it time and time 
again. . . And if you look back, we are sure you can say the 
same thing with equal or perhaps even more emphasis. 

We welcome and appreciate any conunents or thoughts 
you may have concerning the thoughts you read here. 

Deware Funeral Home 

Service Beyond Expectations 
WoUaston Chapel 
576 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02 170 

(617) 472-1137 

Affordability Plus Service 

Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 

A Service Family Aviate ofAFFS and Service Corp. Int. 

492 Rock Street ' Fall River, fAA 02720 » (508) 676-2454 




A funeral Mass for Mary 
Bridget (Curran) Butts. 81, 
of Rockland, formerly of 
North Quincy, was celebrat- 
ed July 11 in Sacred Heart 
Church, North Quincy. 

Mrs. Butts died at home 
surrounded by her family. 

She lived in North Quincy 
for 79 years and was a dedi- 
cated full-time mother to her 
children and those children 
who found their way to her 
doorstep. She always had an 
extra place set at the dinner 
table should anyone drop by. 
Mrs. Butts was known for 
her apple pies, lasagna and 
turkey stuffing. She always 
had a house-full of kids 
and held homemade pizza 
parties on Friday nights at 
11:30 for her children and 
their friends as a way to get 
them all home early. 

She was also a Den 
Mother for Cub Scouts and 
Webelos Pack 28 for many 
years and taught CCD at Sa- 
cred Heart Church. She also 
liked to travel throughout 
the US, Canada and Ireland; 
she was especially fond of 
Newfoundland, Canada and 
proud of her Irish heritage; 
she held her Irish citizenship 
and found many missing 
family links in her extensive 
genealogy research. 

Mrs. Butts was a 1945 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School, an original 
member of the Koch Club 
and was an active member 
of the Quincy and Scituate 
Historical Societies. 

Wife of James J. Butts; 
mother of Lt. Michael Butts, 
Quincy Fire Department, 
and his wife Trisha, of North 
Weymouth, James Butts 
of Port Norfolk, Marianne 
Hemphill and her husband 
Paul of Marshfield, Captain 
Joseph Butts, Manchester, 




MARY BRIDGET BUTTS 

NH Fire Department, of Al- 
lenstown, NH, John Butts 
and his wife Cindy of Bald- 
winville and Eileen Adler 
and her husband Philip of 
South Natick; grandmother 
of Christopher Butts and 
his wife Jennifer of North 
Weymouth, Stacey Butts 
of No. Weymouth, Abigail 
Smith and her husband Ste- 
fan of NH, Lindsey Hemp- 
hill of FL, Kristin Hemphill 
of Marshfield, Shaylyn and 
Tara Butts of NH, John and 
Mark Butts of Baldwinville, 
PFC Jessica Butts of Bald- 
winville and Evan Adler of 
South Natick; great-grand- 
mother of Jonathan Osgood 
and Kyle and Keely Smith; 
daughter of the late Joseph 
and Ellen (Hallahan) Curran 
of Scituate and Ireland; sis- 
ter of Joseph Curran and his 
wife Joan of No. Weymouth; 
friend of Jean Moynihan of 
Quincy. 

Interment was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral anangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Norwell Visiting 
Nurses and Hospice Associ- 
ation, 91 Longwater Circle, 
Norwell, MA 02061 or Ser- 
vants' of Christ Ministry, 87 
Maple St. #A, Scituate, MA 
02066. 



A funeral service for Hel- 
en (Belezos) Tragellis, 81, 
of Quincy, was conducted 
Monday in St. Catherine's 
Greek Orthodox Church, 
Braintree. 

Mrs. Tragellis died July 
8. 

Bom and raised and 
Quincy, she was vice-presi- 
dent of Quincy High School 
Class of 1945 and later at- 
tended Simmons College 
where she received her 
Bachelors and Masters De- 
gree in Social Work. 

She began her career at 
Deaconess Hospital and then 
worked for United Cerebral 
Palsy and South Shore Men- 
tal Health Center in Quincy. 
She also served as a member 
of the Board of Tmstees for 
the Woodward School for 
Girls in Quincy. 

Wife of the late Gregory 
S. Tragellis, WWII veteran; 
mother of Stratton G . Tragel - 
lis and his wife Maria of 
Quincy, Kyria DiPietro and 
her husband Russ of Quincy 
and the late Irene (Renie) 
Tragellis; grandmother of 
Greg, Adam, Rene, Alex, 
Maria and Stephanie; sister 




HELEN TRAGELLIS 

of Nicholas Belezos and his 
wife Angelica of NY and the 
late Connie Boulougouras; 
daughter of the late Frank 
and Kyriacoula Belezos. 

She is also survived by 
many cousins, nieces, neph- 
ews and in-laws. 

Interment was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hamel, 
Wickens & Troupe Funeral 
Home, Quincy Center. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Cooley 's Anemia 
Foundation, National Of- 
fice, 330 Seventh Ave, #900, 
New York, NY 1 0001. 



James F. Sullivan, III 

Project Manager, USMC Veteran 




1955 IN MEMORIAM 2009 

To my son, Paul Elias, 

It's been sixteen years, 
but it seems like it was 
yesterday. I miss you so 
much Paul. 

Love, Dad 



A funeral Mass for James 
F. "Sully" Sullivan, III, of 
Squantum and Montclair, 
was celebrated July 11 in 
Sacred Heart Church, North 
Quincy. 

Mr. Sullivan died July 6. 

A lifelong resident of 
Quincy, he served in the 
United States Marine Corps 
during the Vietnam War. He 
currently worked as a Net- 
working Project Manager 
for EDS and prior to that for 
Bank of Boston and Bank 
of America. He was a mem- 
ber of the American Legion 
Robert I. Nickerson Post 
#382. 

Survived by his friend 
and mother of his three chil- 
dren Jonna Green of Quin- 
cy; father of Corinne, Mark 
and Stephen, all of Quincy; 
brother of Richard Sullivan 
and his wife Christine of 
Marshfield, Laurie and her 
husband Len Palmer of Sci- 
tuate, Tara Sullivan of Scitu- 




Over 60 Years 
Of Personalized Service 

SWEENEY BROTHERS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. • FRANCIS M. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

(617)472-6344 



JAMES F. SULLIVAN, III 

ate and Gregory Sullivan of 
CA. 

He is also survived by 12 
nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Ce- 
dar Grove Cemetery, 
Dorchester. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the American 
Diabetes Association, 330 
Congress St., Boston, MA 
02210-1216. 



Hamel, Wickens & 

Troupe Funeral 

Home 

Honored Providers of: 




<$) 



PHONE TOLL FREE 

(800) 696-5887 

26 Adams Street 
Quincy, Ma 02 1 6$ 
www.HamelFuneralCait.fco] 



1 



Thursday, July 16,2009 Tli« Qttincy Sitn Page 27 



Maria A. McDonough 

A funeral Mass for Maria 
A. (DiOrio) McDonough, of 
Quincy, formerly of Roslin- 
dale, was celebrated July 10 
in St. Ann's Church, Wol- 
laston. 

Mrs. McDonough died 
July 4. 

Wife of the late Myles 
McDonough; mother of 
Myles McDonough and his 
wife Tracey of Braintree, Ja- 
son McDonough of Quincy 
and the late Michael Mc- 
Donough and his wife Shan- 
non of Quincy; daughter of 
the late Adam and Louise 
(Alonzo) DiOrio; sister of 
Kathy DiOrio of Warren, 
Thomas DiOrio of Rochester 
and John DiOrio of Quincy; 
grandmother of Shae, Cian 
and Dylan McDonough. 

She is also survived by 




MARIA A. Mcdonough 

many nieces, nephews, 
cousins and friends. 

Interment was in Forest 
Hills Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to St. Jude Chil- 
dren's Research, PO Box 
50, Memphis, TN 38105. 



Eleanor Frances Pimental, 76 

Secretary 

and her husband James of 
Quincy, Mary Hagerty and 
her late husband John J. of 
CA and the late John Pimen- 
tal; aunt of Robert Kenney 
of Pembroke, Daniel Ken- 
ney of Quincy, John Hager- 



A funeral Mass for Elea- 
nor Frances Pimental, 76, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday at Holy Trinity 
Parish, Most Blessed Sacra- 
ment Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Pimental died July 
6 at Quincy Medical Center, ty, Michael Hagerty, Mark 

Bom in Dorchester, she Hagerty and Ann O'Neal, 
lived in Quincy all of her all of CA, Patrick Hagerty 
life and was a graduate of of ID, David Hagerty of 



Quincy High School. She 
worked as a secretary for 
State Street Bank and was 
a member of the Ladies' 
Sodality at Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church. She also 
loved traveling and making Sweeney 
trips to Foxwoods. Quincy. 

Sister of Agnes Kenney 



MD and the late James P. 
Kenney. 

Interment was in St. Jo- 
seph's Cemetery, Taunton. 

Funeral arrangements 

were made by the Dennis 

Funeral Home, 



Marian Buonvicino 



A funeral Mass for Mar- 
ian (Piazza) Buonvicino, 
of Quincy, was celebrat- 
ed Monday in St. Ann's 
Church, WoUaston. 

Mrs. Buonvicino died 
July 10. 

A lifelong Quincy resi- 
dent, she was a devoted 
wife and mother and was a 
member of the Sons of Italy 
and the Stella DelNord. 

Wife of the late Rocco 
A. Buonvicino; mother of 
Richard Buonvicino and his 
wife Elaine of Duxbury and 



Joan King and her husband 
Robert of Quincy; sister of 
Mary Fantasia of Quincy 
and Maire Pusateri of Kings- 
ton and the late Andrew Cip- 
riano, Nancy Hickson, Irene 
Marotta, Catherine Rodger 
and Sue Cipriano. 

She is also survived by 
two grandchildren. 

Interment was in Knoll- 
wood Memorial Park. Can- 
ton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 



Wreath Honors John Quincy Adams 




CLIFFORD'S FLOWERS of Quincy produced their annual 
White House commissioned wreath for the celebration of the 
birth of John Quincy Adams, the nation's 6th President. Clif- 
ford's has created the nearly 4 foot diameter red, white and 
blue wreath for 25 years. The wreath is on display in the United 
First Parish Church at 1306 Hancock St. in Quincy Center for 
the annual honoring of Adam's legacy. Clifford's Flowers has 
two retail locations at 1229 Hancock St. and 216 Ricciuti Dr. 



Marie E. Graham 

Worked for National Fire Protection Agency 

A funeral Mass for Marie 
E. (Vitt) Graham, of Squan- 
tum, was celebrated Tues- 
day in St. Ann's Church, 
Wollaston. 

Mrs. Graham died July 
9. 

She worked for the Na- 
tional Fire Protection As- 
sociation in Quincy for 
17 years before retiring in 
1999. In her earlier years, 
she worked at the Squantum 
School. She also enjoyed 
reading, gardening and play- 
ing Scrabble. 

Wife of Lt. Joseph Gra- 
ham, Quincy Fire Depart- 
ment (Ret.) of Quincy; 
mother of Diane M. Bus- 
cemi and her husband Ron- 
ald of Plymouth, Maureen 
Solari and her husband 
Michael of Norwell, Jo- 
seph "Billy" Graham, QFD 
and Kelly Pearson of Hol- 
brook; sister of Charles Vitt 




MARIE E.GRAHAM 

of Tewksbury, Ct)nstance 
Dunbar of Weymouth and 
the late Kathleen Barber; 
grandmother of Christopher 
and Brian Buscemi of Plym- 
outh, James and Rachel So- 
lari of Norwell and Lauren 
Graham of Hoi brook. 

Interment was in Blue 
Hill Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by Keohane Fu- 
neral Home, Quincy. 



Dr. Rev. Leicester R. Potter, Jr. 

Chaplain 



A funeral service for Dr. 
Rev. Leicester R. Potter, Jr., 
of Brookline and Hingham, 
was conducted July 10 at 
the Chapel at Cedar Grove 
Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Dr. Rev. Potter died July 
6 at Marian Manor Nursing 
Home, South Boston. 

Born in Boston, he was 
raised in Brookline and 
Hingham. He was a gradu- 
ate of Tufts University, 
Boston University and An- 
dover Newton Theological 
School. He was also the late 
Chaplain at Boston Medical 
Center for 39 years and was 
Director of Pastoral Care 
and Education at Boston 
University. 

He was also a member of 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church and was 



a member of Masons-Scot- 
tish Rite 32"*^ Degree, Rural 
Lodge, Quincy. 

Husband of Vema P. (El- 
lison); father of Robert E. 
and his wife Paulette. Rich- 
ard F. and his wife Kathleen 
and David L. and his wife 
Meg, all of Quincy and John 
S. Potter and his wife Carol 
of Milton; brotherof the late 
Robert Potter. 

He is also survived by 
10 grandchildren and one 
great-grandson. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Alfred 
D. Thomas Funeral Home, 
Milton. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Salvation 
Army, 6 Baxter St., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 



Joanne L. Zappi-Noddin 

Clerk At Marsh & McLennan Companies 

A funeral Mass for Ann of Squantum and Mi- 



Joanne L. (DeChellis) Zap- 
pi-Noddin, of Squantum. 
was celebrated Monday in 
Sacred Heart Church, North 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Zappi-Noddin died 
July 6. 

Born in Boston, she was 
an avid doll and stamp col- 
lector and enjoyed scrap 
booking as a hobby. Wife of 
Merle E. Noddin of Squan- 
tum and the late John V. 



chael Noddin and his liance 
Sarah Scaflidi of Squantum; 
sister of Linda Huntley ot 
NH and the late Joseph 
DeChellis. 

She is also sur\ived by 
14 grandchildren and sev- 
eral nieces and nephews. 

Interment was m Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. Quin- 
cy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 



Zappi, Jr.; mother of Vincent Funeral Home. Quincy. 
Zappi and his wife Kathy of Memorial donations may 
FL, Robert Zappi and his be made to the Paralyzed 
wife Barbara of Whitman, Veterans of America. 801 
Joseph Zappi of Dorchester, Eighteenth St., NW, Wash- 
John Zappi and his wife Lee ington, DC 20006-35 17. 





Honor Your 
Loved One's 

Memory 
With Flowers 


cliffords.com 

1.800.441.8884 



James J 

Painter for MBTA, 

A funeral Mass for James 
J. Fallon, of Quincy. will be 
celebrated today (Thursday) 
at 10 a.m. in Sacred Heart 
Church, North Quincy. 

Mr. Fallon died July 10. 

A lifelong Quincy resi- 
dent, he served in the I nited 
States Arm) during World 
War II and was honored 
with the Purple Heart. 

He worked as a painter 
for the MBIA for many 
years. 

Mr. Fallon was a proud 
lifetime member and past 
Commander of the Rober I . 
Nickerson Post in Squantum 
as well as the DAV Post. 
Quincy Elks and the VFW 
Post. 

He also enjoyed travel- 
ing, sailing and fishing, but 
his true passion was golf. 

Husband of the late Mu- 
riel (Nighan) Fallon; father 
of James J. "Jim" Fallon, 
Jr., and his wife Pat of Mel- 
rose, Janet Andrews and her 
husband Bob of Norfolk. 
Lorraine Maguire and her 
husband John of TX. Louise 



. Fallon 

US Army Veteran 




.lAMES J. FALLON 

Gonsalves and her husband 
Dennis of IX. Judy Ron- 
ning and her husband .Mike 
of TX and the late .Mark 
Fallon; brother of the late 
Evelyn Fallon. 

He is also survived by 
many grandchildren and 
great grandchildren. 

Visiting hours were held 
\Vednesday from 4-8 p.m. 
at Keohane Funeral Home. 
Quincy 

Interment will be in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. Quin- 
cy, 

Memorial donations 

may be made to a charity of 
choice. 



Robert Thayer Foster, 81 

Teacher, USAF Veteran 



A graveside service with 
full military honors for 
Robert Thayer Foster. 8 1 . 
of Sufheld. CT. formerlv 
of Quincy. was conducted 
Monday at the Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Mr. Foster died July 7 at 
Meadow Brook of Granby 

Bom in Quincy, he was 
raised and educated in Quin- 
cy and graduated in 1945 
from North Quincy High 
School. He went on to at- 
tend the University of Mas- 
sachusetts and Springfield 
College. 

Mr. Foster served our 
country with the United 
States Air Force for over 25 
years and after his service 
he taught special education. 
His passion was for sailing 



and gardening and he also 
enjoyed traveling. He was 
also a volunteer with many 
organizations, one of which 
was the Neu England Air 
.Museum, where he volun- 
teered for over 20 years. 

Brother of Barbara Fos- 
ter of CA; cousin of Richard 
Renahan and his wife Bes- 
sie of Mashpee and their 
children Kathv and Diane; 
fnend of Henry Simmonds 
of Suffield; son of the late 
Charles H and Manan 
(Brigham) Foster. 

Memonal donations may 
be made to the New Eng- 
land Air Museum Bradley 
International Airport, 36 Pe- 
rimeter Rd.. Windsor Locks, 
CT 06096 or to Faith I'mted 
Church. 52 Summer .Ave. 
Springfield. \!A 01 108. 



Other Obituaries On Page 29 




DOLAN 

FUNERAL SERVICES 
'Caring for your life's journey" 

♦ Funerals 

♦ Cremations 

♦ Pre-Arrangements 

Serx'ice times and directions at: 

www.dolanfurieral.com 



THE POIAN FAMILY 
W. Craig 
Paul F. 
Frederick |. 
Courtney 



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MILTON MAOIlfWi 

(bl7) ^'<H-^2h4 



Pace 28 Tli« Quiaoy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2009 




KING Crossword 



HOCUS-FOCUS 



BY 
HENRY BOLTINOFF 



ACROSS 

1 Tear 
4 Seashore 
9 Encyc. book 

12 Historic time 

13 Bother 

14 Commotion 

15 Item in 
February's 
mail 

17 High-arc shot 

18 Chiang — - 
shek 

Guarantee 
Pre-Christmas 
period 
Galilee 
village 
Extinct bird 
Carte lead-in 
Black fur 
Afflictions 
Omelet need 
Story line 
Narrow 
apertures 
Dadaist Jean 
A billion 
years 
Information 

43 Largest state 
45 St. George's 



19 
21 

24 

25 
26 
28 
31 
33 
35 
36 

38 
40 

41 



foe 

47 Automobile 

48 See 16-Down 20 

49 Odin's 
maidens 21 

54 Work with 

55 Banishment 22 

56 Baseballer's 

hat 23 

57 Third degree? 27 

58 Cut 29 

59 Greek H 30 

DOWN 32 

1 Gun the 34 
engine 

2 401 (k) 37 
alternative 39 

3 Crony 

4 Chimp's 42 
snack 

5 Designate 44 

6 Singer 
DiFranco 45 

7 Megaphone- 46 
shaped 50 

8 Zoo howlers 

9 Jewelry and 51 
such 

10 Smell 52 

11 Ear part 53 
16 With 48- 



Across, 

supplement 

Break 

suddenly 

Writer 

Kingsley 

Toy shop 

purchase 

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— Khan 

Glimpse 

Sicilian 

volcano 

Men only 

Large black 

bird 

Ranges 

Game 

participant 

Have — to 

grind 

Timetable 

abbr. 

Decorate 

Hurry 

Actress 

Ullmann 

Hockey 

surface 

Dine 

Resort 



€> 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



Wishing ^ Well® 




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"^ HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will give you a 
message every day. It's a numerical puzzle designed to speH 
out your fortune. Count the letters in your first name. If the 
rujmber of letters is6or more, subtract 4. If the number is less 
than 6. add 3. The result is your key number Start at the up- 
per left-hand comer and check one of your key numbers, left 

- to right. Then read the message the letters under the 
checked figures give you. 

O 2000 King FutUTM Syndtcale, Inc. WbrU rtghls reserved 




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for tarsi? 

2. ANIMAL KINGDOM: 
What is the average 
lifespan of a housefly? 

3. MOVIES: What was the 
name of the volleyball that 
became Tom Hanks' com- 
panion in "Cast Away"? 

4. MEASURES: How 
much beer would a firkin 
hold? 

5. MYTHOLOGY: What 
area of life did the Roman 
goddess Discordia rule? 

6. BIBLE: Which of the 
Ten Commandments for- 
bids thievery? 

7. U.S. CITIES: What is 
the capital of Vermont? 



MAGIC MAZE 



is the basic currency of 
North Korea? 

9. ASTROLOGY: What is 
Libra's symbol? 

10. LITERATURE: What 
famous author went by the 
pseudonym of "Boz"? 

Answers 

1 . Ankles 

2. About two to three 
weeks 

3. Wilson 

4. Nine gallons 

5. Strife or disorder 

6. Eighth Commandment: 
"You shall not steal" 

7. Montpelier 

8. The won 

9. The scales 

10. Charles Dickens 

O 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 

. FROM WHERE 
^ WE SPEAK 



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Stars 



ARIES (March 21 to April 

19) Your Aries leadership qual- 
ities can help bring order out of 
all that confusion, whether it's 
on the job or in the home. But 
be careful to guide, not goad, 
others into following you. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 

20) Applying a more personal 
view to a job-linked issue could 
help provide better insight into 
those persistent problems. Use 
your keen Taurean logic to cut 
through the double-talk. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 
20) Taking some time off could 
be the best way to get through 
that seemingly endless round 
of demands. You'll return re- 
freshed and ready to tackle 
things from a new perspective. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) Restoring a sagging profes- 
sional relationship takes a lot of 
effort. By all means, state your 
position. But also make sure 
you pay close attention to the 
other person's point of view. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
A hot prospect intrigues the Big 
Cat, who is always on the prowl 
for a promising investment. But 
be careful that this "promise" 
has a chance of being kept. 
Check it out more carefully. 

VIRGO (August 23 to Sep- 
tember 22) A friend could use 
some of your compassion and 
concern. If he or she doesn't 
ask for help, be sure you step 
up and make the first move. 
Also, check out a new career 
possibility. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) You might have 
difficulty getting your opin- 
ions heard because of all the 
noise being made by the other 



side. But hang in there. Others 
should line up with you once 
they learn the facts. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 2 1 ) Offering to help 
a colleague is commendable. 
But before you commit your 
time and effort, check to see if 
that person's situation is all that 
he or she has led you to believe 
it is. 

SAGITTARIUS (Novem 
ber 22 to December 21) You 
should sot)n be seeing positive 
results from your recent efforts 
on behalf of a family member. 
On another matter, check that 
you have all the facts regarding 
a job assignment. 

CAPRICORN (December 
22 to January 1 9) Your aspects 
favor closer family relation- 
ships this week. Take time for 
visits, whether in person, by 
phone, by mail or in cyber- 
space. Let them know how im- 
portant they are to you. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) A missed oppor- 
tunity isn't always a negative. 
Maybe your instincts are telling 
you not to rush into something 
you "thought" was worthwhile. 
Make time for family this 
weekend. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) Your sense of humor 
helps you get through a tricky 
situation. But some stick-in-the- 
muds might not be so willing to 
make the changes that you and 
others agree are necessary. 

BORN THIS WEEK: You 

have a gift for making everyone 
you know — or even just met - 
feel important and welcome in 
your life. 

O 2009 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



CryptoQuip 

This is a simple substitution cipher in which each letter used stands 

for another. If you thinl( that X equals O, It will equal O throughout 

the puzzle. Solution is accomplished by trial and error. 

Clue: D equals E 

EMD AKV OBSESTM 



GAOKDUYG HYT PCSED 

MDYKEMI. MD YKHYIT 

MYV EMBDD TPCSBD 

UDYKT Y VYI. 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 

Magic Maze 
King Crossword ANSWERS: 

ANSWERS FROM WHERE 

Solution time: 21 mins. WE SPEAK 



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Thursday, July 16, 2009 Tlie Qiiincy Sxua. Page 29 



Obituaries 



John J. Swanson, 67 

Mechanical Engineer 



A funeral service for John 
L. Swanson, 67, of Hing- 
ham, formerly of Quincy, 
was conducted Wednesday 
in Old Ship Church, Hing- 
ham. 

Mr. Swanson died July 
1 1 at Brigham and Women's 
Hospital, Boston. 

Bom in Boston, he grew 
up in Quincy and had been 
a resident of Hingham for 
over 25 years. 

He earned his doctorate 
in mechanical engineering 
from Northeastern Univer- 
sity and then went on to 
work as a mechanical engi- 
neer for Arthur D. Little and 
Thermoelectron. He was 
also a member of the South 
Shore Camera Club and the 
Board of Directors of Bare 
Cove Park. 

Husband of Barbara 
Swanson of Hingham; fa- 
ther of Sarah Ush of NfY, 
Lynne Swanson of FL, Amy 
Lash-Boyle of RI and Albert 




JOHN J. SWANSON 

Lash, IV of MD; brother of 
Robert Swanson of Quincy 
and Nancy Casinelli of 
Quincy; grandfather of Sa- 
die Boyes, Eloise Lash and 
Orly Boyes. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Pyne Ke- 
ohane Funeral Home, Hing- 
ham. 

Memorial donations 
may be made to the Ameri- 
can Heart Association, 20 
Speen St., Framingham, MA 
01701. 



Helen J. Meleedy, 92 

Worked At Purity Supreme Markets 



A funeral Mass for Helen 
J. (McCarthy) Meleedy, 92, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday in St. John the Bap- 
tist Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Meleedy died July 
10 at the William B. Rice 
Eventide Home in Quincy. 

Bom in Quincy, she 
was raised and educated in 
North Quincy schools and 
was a 1935 graduate of 
North Quincy High School. 
She was a lifelong Quincy 
resident. She was employed 
for 28 years with Purity Su- 
preme Markets and worked 
at various locations, includ- 
ing the Hingham and Wol- 
laston markets. She had 
been retired over 25 years. 

Mrs. Meleedy also en- 
joyed sewing, reading, trav- 
eling, music and dancing 
and was devoted to her chil- 
dren and grandchildren. 

Wife of the late Edward 
J. Meleedy; mother of Ed- 
ward J. Meleedy and his 
wife Nancy of Whitman, 




HELEN J. MELEEDY 

boro. 

She is also survived by 
five grandchildren, nine 
great grandchildren and one 
great great granddaughter. 

Interment was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery, West Quin- 
cy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funer- 
als, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the William B. 
Rice Eventide Home Wom- 



Eileen T. Devaney and Janet en's Auxiliary, 215 Adams 
M. Gordon, both of Middle- St., Quincy, MA 02169. 

JoanC.Galvin 

Employee Of Bay Cove Human Services 

A funeral Mass for Joan and her husband Brian of 

C. (Bastey)Galvin,ofQuin- Rockland and Jaime Grant 

cy, will be celebrated today and her husband George of 

(Thursday) at 10:30 a.m. in Quincy; sister of Linda Gale 



St. Agatha Church, Milton. 

Mrs. Galvin died July 
13. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
a lifelong Quincy resident 



and her husband George of 
GA. 

She is also survived by 
11 grandchildren. 

Visiting hours were held 



and she was a graduate of Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. 
North Quincy High School, at the Alfred D. Thomas Fu- 



She was a late employee of 
Bay Cove Human Services, 
Boston. 

Wife of Gregory F. Gal- 
vin of Quincy; mother of 
Laurie Higgins and her hus- 



neral Home, Milton. 

Interment will be in 
Cedar Grove Cemetery, 
Dorchester. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to The Gillete Cen- 



band Matthew of Quincy, ter for Gynecology AOncol- 

Kerry Westerlund and her ogy, c/o Dr. Richard Penson, 

husband Christopher of Yawkcy Center, Suite 9E, 55 

Brockton, Kimbcrly Dalia Fruit St., Boston 02114. 



Theresa A. Gentile, 96 



A funeral Mass for The- 
resa A. (DiPiero) Gentile, 
96, of Quincy, was celebrat- 
ed Tuesday in St. John the 
Baptist Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Gentile died July 8. 

Wife of the late Louis 
Gentile; mother of Theresa 
A. Poule and her husband 
William of Dedham, Lor- 
raine G. Haynes and her 
husband Ric of Quincy and 
Louis A. Gentile and his 
wife Rosemarie of Scitu- 
ate; grandmother of Lisa M. 
Poule of Dedham, Kristen 
A. Burm of Hingham and 
James Gentile of Scituate; 
great-grandmother of Al- 
exandra M. Poule, Julie 
H. Burm, Alana T. Burm, 
Nikolas Poule and Brendan 
D. Burm; sister of Josephine 
DiTocco of Hingham and 
the late John DiPiero and 
Anna Masciarelli of Italy. 




Angus McEachern, 81 

Retired Quincy Police Officer, Navy Veteran 



THERESA A. GENTILE 

She is also survived by 
several nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery, Quin- 
cy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Italian Home 
for Children, 1125 Cen- 
tre St., Jamaica Plain, MA 



02130. 

Cradles To Crayons Receives 
$10,000 Donation From Staples 



Staples Foundation for 
Learning, Inc. (SFFL) has 
donated $10,000 to Quincy- 
based Cradles to Crayons 
for its Ready for School 
program. 

Ready for School ensures 
low-income youth are pre- 
pared to begin school with 
the necessary education 



supplies. 

Since 2007, Staples and 
SFFL have donated $40,000 
to Cradles to Crayons. 

The donation is part 
of SFFL's commitment to 
supporting non-profit or- 
ganizations that align with 
the foundation's mission to 
teach, train and inspire. 



A funeral Mass for An- 
gus "Babe" McEachem, 81 , 
of Carver, formerly of Quin- 
cy. will be celebrated Satur- 
day at 10 a.m. in St. Ann's 
Church, Wollaston. 

Mr. McEachem died June 
28 in Florida. 

Born in Quincy, he served 
in the United States Navy 
during World War 11 and lat- 
er spent many years on the 
Quincy Police Department 
before retiring to Carver. 

Husband of the late Bar- 
bara J, (Hutchins); father 
of Angus McEachem, Jr., 
QPD, of Kingston. Fred- 
erick McEachem of Quin- 
cy, George and William 
McEachem, both of Carver, 
John McEachem of Wey- 
mouth, Robert McEachem 
of Bridgewater, Thomas 
McEachem of Holiday, FL. 
Christine Williams and Jean- 
nie Mann, both of Carver. 
Eleanor Wright of Hebron, 
NH, Teresa O'Sullivan of 
Pembroke, Beverly Cook of 
Holiday, FL and Mary Ann 
Carmack of Hudson, FL 
and the late Richard and Jo- 
seph McEachem; brother of 
Christina Gosslin of Quincy 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

Docket No. NO09P1610EA 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Norfolk Probate 

and Family Court 

35 Shawmut Road 

Canton, MA 02021 

In the Estate of: 

Joanne Marie Daley 

Late of: Quincy, MA 021 69 

Date of Death: 04/03/2009 

To all persons interested in 

the above captioned estate, a 

petition has been presented 

requesting that a document 

purporting to be the last will 

of said decedent be proved 

and allowed and that Paul 

Michael Daley of Quincy, MA 

be appointed executorArix, 

named in the will to serve 

Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
Qfi/12/2QQ9. 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court. 
Date: June 29, 2009. 

PATRICK W. McOERMOTT 
Ragtotar of Probata 
7/16/09 



NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

Doclcet No. NO09P1643EA 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Norfolk Probate 

and Family Court 

35 Shawmut Road 

Canton. MA 02021 

in the Estate of: 

Marianna Suchacka 

Late of: Quincy, MA 02169 

Date of Death: 04/03/2009 

To all persons interested in 

the above captioned estate, a 

petition has been presented 

requesting that a document 

purporting to be the last will 

of said decedent be proved 

and allowed and that Danuta 

A. Wisniewski of Quincy, MA 

be appointed executor/trix, 

named in the will to serve 

Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 

08^12/2009 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court. 

Date: July 1 , 2009. 

PATRICK W. McOERMOTT 
Raoistor of Prob a ta 

7/16/09 



NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

Doclcet No. NO09P1644EA 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Norfolk Probate 

and Family Court 

35 Shawmut Road 

Canton, MA 02021 

in the Estate of: 

Margaret Mildred Wagner 

a/k/a M. Mildred Wagner 

a/k/a Mildred Wagner 

Late of: Quincy, MA 021 69 

Date of Death: 05/24/2009 

To all persons interested in 

the above captioned estate, a 

petition has been presented 

requesting that a document 

purporting to be the last will 

of said decedent be proved 

and allowed and that Linda 

B. Beal of South Easton, MA 

be appointed executorArix, 

named in the will to serve 

Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
Oa/1 2/2009 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlois, First Justice 
of ttiis Court. 
\pate: July 1 , 2009. 

PATRICK W. McOERMOTT 
^^ Ragtotar of Probata 
7/16/09 

\ 




ANGUS McEACHERN 

and the late Francis. John, 
George. William and Joseph 
McEachem. 

He is also survived by 
many grandchildren and 
great grandchildren and sev- 
eral nieces and nephews. 

Visiting hours will be 
held Friday from 3-8 p m m 
the Keohane Funeral Home, 
Quincy. 

Interment will be in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery, Quin- 
cy. 

Memorial donations 

may be made to the Quincy 
DARE Program, c/o Quincy 
Police, 1 Sea St., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 



LEGAL NOTICE 



Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family 

Court Departn>ent 

Norfolk Division 

Docket N0.97P1339GI 
Notice of 
Fiduciary's Account 

To the persons interest- 
ed in the estate of George 
Bouchard late of Quincy in 
the county of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P 
Rule 72 that the 1 st-1 0th and 
final account(s) of George 
Rodriguez Esq. as Guardian 
(the fiduciary) of said prop- 
erty of said George Bouchard 
has been presented to said 
Court for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a writ- 
ten appearance in said Court 
at Canton on or before the 
18th day of August, 2009 
the return day of this cita- 
tion. You may upon written 
request by registered or certi- 
fied mail to the fiduciary, or to 
the attorney of the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you must, 
in addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds 
for each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the ^ 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P Rule 5. 

WITNESS, Robert W. 
Langlois, ESQUIRE, FIRST 
JUSTICE of said Court at 
Canton this 30th day of June, - 
2009. 

PATRICK W. McOERMOTT 
Ragiatar of Probata 
7/16A)9 



Page 30 Tl&e Qt&lncy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2009 




raiJBe 



FOR SALE 



BLUE HILL 
CEMETERY 

Single lot for 2 burials incl. 

2 custom built vaults 

1 bronze memorial 

321-474-2374 

716 



FOR SALE- 2005 

HONDA SHADOW 750 

Dark blue and black with chrome 
8,000 miles, saddle bags and 

windshield. Mint condition 
$5500 - John 617-773-4761 

'Smart people ride a bike' 

i> 1 



7 SALON STATIONS: 

4 are light wood-like 
formica... $400 

3 are maple cabinet 

stations with blue tops 

(can be used in a kitchen) 

4,4x5 mirrors 

included... $300 

2 lighted glass 
display cases... $100 

1 lighted glass tower 
display case... $150 

All are in excellent condition 

Call Nanci at 781-956-6903 



MISCELLANEOUS 



AUTOMOBILES 
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE 
RECEIVE FREE VACA- 
TION Voucher United 
Breast Cancer Foundation 
Free Mammograms, Breast 
Cancer info www.ubcf.info 
FREE towing, Fast, Non- 
Runners Accepted, 24/7 
1-888-468-5964 

BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITY 

ALL CASH VENDING! 

Do you earn $800 in a 
day? Your own local can- 
dy route. Includes 25 Ma- 



WANTED 



OLD HAND TOOLS 
& BOOKS WANTED 

Planes, chisels, adzes, shaves. 

machinist, and sheetnietal tcx)ls. 

calipers, clamps, anvils, vises. 

USEFUL TOOLS, ALL TRADES. 

New England history books 

Collections: old postcards, toys, 

military, huntmg and fishing items. 

LIBERTY TOOL CO. 

888-405-2007 

Da vistownmuseum .or^ 

e-Store & antique sale! 1 1 



FOR SALE 



Aquariums: 

135 gallon acrylic and base, 
90 and 60 gallon tank, hood, 

bases.$750, $250, $100 
respecitively, Complete Sets 

617-481-1579 «/-3 



PERSONAL 



Happy 85 th 
Birthday 
July 24th 

Norma/Mom/Gram 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



7 If) 



Happy Memories 

to our Dad- 
Tony Trubiano 
from Julia and 
"Fiddle De's" a 
"Fiddle Dum's" 



(7-8-2004) 



7/16 



Olivia Lydon Froehlich 

HAPPY 
SUMMER FUN!!! 

-LOVE, NANA 




MSTKEET 

buildiMq & dutgn^ 

General Contractor 



New Homes, Additions, 

Kitchens & Baths, 

Remodeling, Decks, Roofing 

Lie. & Ins. cs#869 1 5 Robert MaHio 

^HIC#1473032 |^17.786-1648 

See our Website www.mainstreetbuild.com 86 



7/16 



MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS 



LESSONS 



SENIOR SCOOTER 

FOR SALE- used 4 

times; Paid $800, will 

take $600 or B.O. Leave 

message, 617-328-4331 

7/16 



FOR SALE 1994 FORD 

TAURUS- 6 cylinder 

13,146 actual mileage, 

must be seen to appreciate 

Best Offer 617-773-0829 



SUMMER VOICE 
LESSONS 

Learn healthy singing techniques, 

build confidence, learn to read 

music, improve posture and 

breathing and so much more! 

Tracy O'Sullivan 617.773-5587 



7/.10 



7/16 



MISCELLANEOUS 



chines and Candy, all for 
$9,995. 1-800-921-3949 

BUSINESS OPPORTU- 
NITY in the Christian Mar- 
ket. Concessions for only 
ONE person per city Keep 
100% of the revenue. Go 
to www.ChristianLeader- 
sWanted.com 

"Major National Insurance 
Company has a limited 
number of local agen- 
cies for sale in RI/CT/ 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



MISCELLANEOUS 



VT/ME/NH. A great Busi- 
ness Opportunity! Please 
send inquiries to: agen- 
cyforsale@aol.com or 
fax: 866-296-7535 

HEALTH & BEAUTY 

15 PEOPLE WANTED 
to lose up to 30 lbs in 30 
Days! 100% Guaranteed! 
Dr. Recommended! Call 
800-962-4290 www.los- 
e4energy.com 

HELP WANTED 
AVON! Career or pocket 
money, you decide! Up to 
50% commission profit. 
Low start up. Email ISR 
Lwiiber@aol.com or call 
toll free 1-800-258-1815 



French Teens Need 
Families NOW for August 
3 weeks. Adopt a French 
teen. Great cultural ex- 
perience. Students bring 
spending money, insured. 
Families compensated 
SlOO/week. Call or email 
Kll\/I TODAY! 1-800-421- 
7217 facehill@comcast. 
net website: www.LEC- 
USA.com PLEASE HELP! 

HOME IMPROVEMENT 
EARL'S POWER WASH/ 
EXTERIOR PAINTING. 

Washing starting at $150. 
LicensedAinsured, hard 
working, honest contrac- 
tor. Free estimates. Credit 
cards accepted. Licensed 
-CT-#501225, Rl-#26194. 
1-800-273-4650, www.ae- 
homeimprovements.com 

Roofing, siding and Car- 
pentry Specialist! FREE 
Estimates! Call Campbell 
Roofing and Construction 
Today! (781) 706-0132; 
http://Campbellroofs.com 



HOUSES FOR SALE 
FORECLOSED HOME 
AUCTION STATEWIDE 

250+ Homes Must Be 
Sold! REDC / Free Bro- 
chure www.Auction.com 

LAND FOR SALE 
NYS LAND SALE JULY 

SPECIAL! lOAcres- Lake- 
front WAS: $79,900 NOW: 
$49,900. 5 Acres w/Rustic 
Camp Salmon River Area 
$19,900. 46 Acres- Bor- 
ders Stateland, ponds, 
foodplot $59,900. 4 Acres 
in Southern Tier #1 Deer 
County! WAS: $16,900 
NOW: $8,900. Over 100 
different properties. Many 
sizes & areas. Trees, 
ponds, lakes & streams 
www.landandcamps.com 
800-229-7843 Christmas 
& Associates 

Sunday River Area Maine 
LAND LIQUIDATION 

Huge Mountain Views! 



60.72 Acres $89,900!! 
90% Owner Financing 
Beautiful mountain views. 
Warranty Deed. Guaran- 
teed Buildable. (877) 640- 
5263- 7 days. NorthernA- 
cres.com/NECAN 

MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 
AWARD WINNING Kayak 
pools Looking for Demo 
Home sites SAVE $1500! 
Free Survey 1-800-752- 
9000 www.Ambassador- 
pools.com 

CHERRY BEDROOM 
SET. Solid Wood, never 
used, brand new in factory 
boxes. English Dovetail. 
Original cost $4500. Sell 
for $795. Can deliver. Call 
Tom 617-395-0373 

LEATHER LIVING ROOM 

SET in original plastic, 
never used. Original price 
$3,000, sacrifice $975. 
Call Bill 857-453-7764 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-050 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
August 4, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor In the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 021 69. On the application of Richard McLaughlin 
for a Variance/Finding to demolish the existing single family 
home and construct a new single family home a two car garage 
and a living level in violation of Title 1 7 as amended Chapter 
17.24 (finding) and Chapter 17.20.040 (dimensional) on the 
premises numbered 70 GLADSTONE STREET QUINCN. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/16/09,7/23/09 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-052 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, Au- 
gust 4, 2009 at 7:1 5 pm on the Second Floor In the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 
021 69. On the application of Jimmy Lu for a Variance/Finding 
to construct a second story addition in violation of Title 1 7 as 
amended Chapter 17.20.040 (dimensional) on the premises 
numbered 162 BELMONT STREET, QUINCY. 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/16/09,7/23/09 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-054 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 1 7 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
August 4, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 021 69. On the application of Michael Bascomb, 
Trustee of DGB Trust for a Finding to convert the existing 
two-family residence into a Lodging House in violation of Title 
17 as amended Chapter 17.24 (finding) and Chapter 17.28 
(parking) on the premises numbered 32 SPEAR STREET, 
QUINCY 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/16/09,7/23/09 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-051 

Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 

MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 

of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 

i August 4, 20O9 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 

Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 

Quincy, MA 021 69. On the application of Al P. Endriunas for a 

Variance/Finding to demolish the existing single family home 

and construct a new single family home in violation of Title 1 7 

as amended Chapter 17.20.040 (dimensional) and Chapter 

17.24 (finding) on the premises numbered 5 WAUMBECK 

STREET QUINCY 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 

7/16/09. 7/23/09 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-053 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, 
August 4, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of Triet Truong for a 
Variance to enclose the existing front porches in violation 
of Title 17 as amended Chapter 17.20.040 (dimensional re- 
quirements) on the premises numt)ered 106-108 RUGGLES 
STREET, QUINCY 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/16/09, 7/23/09 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 09-055 
Pursuant to the provisbns of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on Tuesday, Au- 
gust 4, 2009 at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the Council 
Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 
021 69. On the application of Neighborhood Housing Services 
& Dan Flynn, III for a Special Permit/Variance to demolish the 
existing single family home and construct a 24-unit apartment 
building in violation of Title 1 7 as amended Chapter 1 7.20.040 
(lot area) and Chapter 17.28.020 (parking) on the premises 
numbered 45 WINTER STREET. QUINCY 

Martin Aikens, Chairman 
7/16/09,7/23/09 



Thursday, July 16, 2009 Tlie Quincy Sua Page 3 1 



GD^A^SQDraOEe 



1 



FOR RENT 



HALL RENTAL 

GEORGE F.BRYAN 

POST #613 

24 Broad St., Quincy, MA 

Rentals for all Occasions 

617-472-6234 

617-479-2254 



ih 



SONS OF ITALY 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Call now to book your Party 

and other Special Events 

617-472-5900 

www.QuincySOlxom u 



MORRISETTE 
LEGION POST 

81-83 Liberty St., Quincy 

Function Hall Available 

Call for Details 

617770-4876 

Internet Capable • Weddings • 

Showers • Christenings • Meetings 



SERVICES 



LOCAL PAINTER 

CUP & SAVE 

Average Room - walls $150 

Ceilings $75. Also windows, 

doors, trim, etc. Inside or out. 

Prompt, clean service. 

Kevin 781-331-5392 

Cell 508-221-1447 



WOLLASTON YACHT CLUB 

Quincy Shore Drive 

Function Hall Available 
All Occasions 

May thru Oct. • 617-472-9796 
City & Ocean Views ^^^^ 



B-Clean Housecleaning Co. 

Weekly, bi-weekly or monthly. 

Responsible, reliable and 

efficient. Many local references. 

Call for FREE estimate: 
Lara Temullo 6 1 7-827-0576 

8/27 



MISC. SERVICES 



Searching for Childcare? 

The Milton Area Family Childcare 

Assoc, has members with openings. 

Contact Ruth 

617-698-3222 or 

Rudybal@comcast.net 7/if, 



SERVICES 



JUNK REMOVAL 

Clean-Outs 
Dumpster Rentals 

Final Pick 
617-251-6242 

finalpickservlces.com 



SAVE 

Budget Fuel 



Fuel Assistance 

Senior Discount 

Full Service 

617-328-4063 



SERVICES 



S.G. HAROLD 

PLUMBING, HEATING & AC 

Specializing inViessman Boiler 
Unico Air Conditioning 

Home heating repairs & service 
Radiant Floor heating 

Quincy 
617-471-0914 

Unprecedented Service Tailored to You 

MA I, It *10S«9 II 



AMERICAN LEGION POST 380 

1116 SEA STREET, QUINCY 
HALL FOR RENT 

Full Liquor License 
Kitchen Facilities available 
Contact: Functions Manager 
617-479-6149 ■> 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Red Sox 

Tickets Opportunity: 

18 seats, Sun., Aug. 30... 

benefits Lazarus 

House Ministries. 

Contact Monique 

617-328-7113 



7/16 



QNQ Girls 
HockettTeam 

Bottle & Can Drive 

July 18 • 10am -2pm 
at NQ HighSchool 7/16 



SERVICES 



CLASSES 



Children's Ceramic Classes 

Wed.&Thurs. 11:30 am- 1:00 pm 
starting July 15th, call for info. 

E & T Ceramics 
367 Billings Rd.,Wollaston 
617-479-4107 72^ 



ROOMMATE 
WANTED 



I'm a 33-yr. old, single, professional 

woman looking for a roommate 

to share my 3 BR, 2 BA house 

in-ground pool . Sorry, no pets or 

children. Smoking on the enclosed 

pt>rch is ok. (QUINCY) Move in 

ASAP- $780 inc. everything 

email: daisy 276(3 aoi.com 7/30 



Quincy Room For Rent 
On bus line, clean & quiet 

$125/week, includes all 
Call Bill 617-750-1397 



7/16 



IMAGE A 
LANDSCAPING 

Spring Clean-ups 

We clean it, trim it, 
remove it. . . 

Quality Workmanship 
since 1972 

Free Estimates 
Fully Insured 

617-471-0044 



SERVICES 



Jim Riley 



Riley Construction 

Commercial & Residential Roofing All Phases 
Windows and Gutters 




27 Beebe Road 
Quincy, MA 02169 
(617)472-3335 



Licensed & Fully Insured 

Mass Reg #138824 

Free Estimates 



S.2() 




M.J. NICHOLLS LANDSCAPING 

Design & Construction 

Masonry • Walkways • Stairs 

Retaining Walls • Drainage 

Watergardens • Excavation 

Pavers & Asphalt Driveways 

Hydroseeding, Maintenance Sen/ices, Plantings & much More 

www.nichollslandscaping.coin 



Matthew 
NichoUs 

(617) 
293-9396 



9/3 



SiLENZi Roofing 
& Remodeung 

Rubber & Shingle Roofing • Rot & 

Termite Repair • Replacement Doors 

& Windows • Carpentry & Painting 

(781) 588-6971 



H: 1 ^ 



T&M 
Landscape Co. 

• Spring & Fall Cleanups 

• Power Washing 

• Lawn Mowing Services 

• Yard Mulching 

• Bushes & Trees Trimmed 

Free Estimates 

617-733-4554 

-- Aftordablk R.vfes ~ 

7 (1. 



SERVICES 



POWER PLUMBING 

Plumbing, Heating, Gas Fitting 

Repairs • New Installations 

Dave 617-328-3007 

Emergencies 617-792-4054 
Master Lie # 13749 11 



SERVICES 



PFC Plumbing & Heating 

REPAIRS 

NEW INSTALLATIONS 

GAS FITTING, HEATING 

PAT 
Uc.# 31638-j 617-750-3617 



RICCIARDI 

Excavation, Demo, 

Concrete Cutting, Bulkheads, 

Landscape Construction 

617-293-3635 



Please Recycle 
This Newspaper 



You've Tried The Rest... Now Try The Best! 

^Sunshine Maids ^ 

^r "Irish Oirl" and her staff 1^ 

Locally Owned A Operated 

Same Day Service Available - Residential A Commercial 

Weekly / Bi-week / Monthly • Moved In's / Move Out's 

Before A after party cleaning 

Year round window A gutter cleaning 



Free Estimates 



781-762-4944 Bonded & Insured 




MOVERS 
COURIERS 

Comm. & Res. 
Free Estimates 

508-588-0007 




Hancock 
TM & Appliance 

Sales, ServicBj 
Parts & Installation 

Since 1945 

(617)472-1710 

115 Franklin Street, 
Quincy, MA 

hancocktvandappliance.com 



PAINTING BY PROFESSION.\L 

Inrenr)r & I-xtenor 

Powcrwashing & f^arpenrrv 

.\11 Types of House Repairs 

Reasonable Price 

Small johs Welcome "" 

L^avc Message 617-773-4761 



LAWN MOWER 

REPAIR SERVICE 

Pickup & Delivery 

Fast Service 

617-471-2646 



DeFrancesco Construction 

Spenalizin^ In: REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 

ROOFING - TRIM - GUTTERS - VINYL SIDING 

Call Today for a quick, FREE Estimate 

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30 Year Guarantee on Ail Workmanship 

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Fully 
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Sealcoating 
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Edging ♦ Weeding ♦Mulching ♦ Small Tree Removal 

Hedge & Shrub Trimming or Removal ♦ Dethatching ♦ Rototilling 

Over Seeding ♦ Complete Yard Maintenance ♦ Lawn Mowing 




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MAIL TO: 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 

□ Autos 
Q Boats 

Q For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

G Lost & Found 

□ Real Estate 
Ll Antiques 

[J Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 

□ Instruction 

□ Daycare 

□ Personal 

U Miscellaneous 



THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 

RATES 

1 WEEK □ $8.00 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 

lOc for each additional word. 

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DEADLINE: FRIDAY .4T 4PM. PLEASE INCLUDE VOL R PHONE Nl MBER IN AD. 



Page 32 Tbe QiAincy Sun Thursday, July 16, 2009 





FIRE PREVENTION AIDS - Mayor Thomas Koch and fire officials accept a $2580 
check from Michael Spaziani, FMS Manager, during a recent ceremony at North 
Quincy Fire Station. The grant funds will provide new equipment for the city's Fire 
Prevention Bureau. From left are Acting Fire Chief Joseph Barron, Mayor Koch, Spa- 
ziani, and Captain Richard Bryan of the Fire Prevention Bureau. 

Photo CourtesY Quinc\ Fire Department 

$2^80 Grant Will 
Aid Fire Prevention 



WOLLASTON CENTER MAKEOVER - New ideas for Wol- 
laston Center interest Jennifer Orniond, owner of Coffee Break 
Cafes and Ward 5 Councillor Douglas Gutro. Both Gutro and 
Ormond expressed enthusiasm about the new ideas for the 
area provided existing businesses are protected and ground- 
water problems are addressed. 



An ounce of prevention 
is worth a pound of cure, 
according to the old prov- 
erb and that's the motto for 
the Fire Department's Fire 
Prevention Bureau which 
recently received a $2,580 
grant from FM Global . 

"We're going to use it for 
equipment for prevention," 
Captain Richard Bryan said, 
noting that the bureau cov- 
ers three vital firefighting 
areas: Investigations, Code 
Enforcement and Educa- 
tion. 

Bryan said the funds will 
cover the costs of digital 
and video cameras, one or 
two laptop computers, and 
software which can be used 
for all three areas of the bu- 
reau's work. 

FM Global, one of the 
largest property insurers of 
business property, awards 
prevention grants quarterly 
to fire departments through 
its highly competitive Fire 
Prevention Grant Program. 



Applicants must identify 
the need for funding and tar- 
get programs that will have 
the greatest impact on pre- 
venting, preparing for and 
controlling fire in the com- 
munity. 

"At FM Global, we be- 
lieve the majority of prop- 
erty damage is preventable 
- not inevitable - and we 
are pleased to make funding 
available to organizations, 
like the Quincy Fire Depart- 
ment, that share the same 
philosophy," said Michael 



Spaziani, manager of FM's 
Fire Prevention Grant Pro- 
gram. The company is based 
in Johnston, RI. 

"After all, it's much bet- 
ter to prevent a disaster than 
to recover from one," Spa- 
ziani said. 

Spaziani presented the 
check to Mayor Thomas 
Koch during a recent cer- 
emony at North Quincy Fire 
Station. Also, on hand at the 
event were Acting Chief Jo- 
seph Barron, Bryan and fire- 
fighters. 



Quincy Seniors Invited 
To Kennedy Center Luncheon 



A grand opening celebra- 
tion for Quincy seniors will 
be held Friday, Aug 7 at 
noon at the Kennedy Cen- 
ter, 440 East Squantum St., 
North Quincy. 

The luncheon will fea- 
ture a hot dinner and live en- 
tertainment from the group 
"Ronnie and Friends." 



Tours of the new center 
will also be available. 

The event is sponsored 
by The River Bay Club of 
Quincy. 

To sign up for the lun- 
cheon or for more informa- 
tion, call the Quincy Council 
on Aging at 617-376-1506. 



Is jrowr tuemtj iloatiim «w»jr on your 

inraraiMMi oostsT 



New Vision For WoUaston Center 

Cant 'd From Page 3 
proved roadways, parking, 
and signage. 

Interest in a revival of the 
old Wollaston Theater has 
already recharged interest 
in Wollaston Center, and the 
team incorporated a planned 
revival of "Old Wolly" into 
their concept. 

On June 16, the theater 
and attached buildings were 
purchased for $ 1 , 1 45 ,000 by 
Wollaston Development As- 
sociates, LLC, a partnership 
based in White Plains, NY, 
and tied to Quincy Center 
developer Street Works. 

The plan calls for a small 
plaza at the theater as well 
as streetscape improve- 
ments through and includ- 
ing Hancock Street in a sec- 
ond phase. 

While the team main's 
focus was Wollaston Cen- 
ter, they called the adjacent 
residential area with land- 
scaped homes and tree-lined 
streets impressive and rec- 
ommended a greenway bike 
path from the center to East- 
em Nazarene College cam- 
pus and Wollaston Beach 
and future improvements 
north and south on Hancock 
Street. 

"We're really emphasiz- 
ing maintaining the residen- 
tial character," said intern 
Abhishek Sharma while her 
counterpart, Jill Allen cited 
the homes and 'great trees' 
in the surrounding area. 

"It's a real good start. The 
pedestrian traffic is the high- 
est anywhere, " Ed Flavin of 
Flavin and Flavin real estate 
and insurance company said 
of the concept. "Wollaston 
right now is a prime target 
for redevelopment." 

"You've really stimu- 
lated the beginning of a 
dialogue," Ward 5 City 
Councillor Douglas Gutro 
said after the presentation, 
adding "This won't sit on a 
shelf " 

However, Gutro ques- 
tioned the teams' plans for 
water collection, noting, 
"What sits beneath us is a 
1000-acre drainage area" 
that seeps in the system and 
pollutes Wollaston Beach. 




--«*' ■■■','A 



iairti^.«5 



DMi*t lust automatica^ir retuw wliat yn luiYe! 
Call as rii^ «war as oar cBsnts ar* saving hundred of dollars 
4MI thdr anto and h — €« w nars insnranec i 

CoU for a fast troo quoto. 



6I7-T72^3»0*- 



it«iwniraitce>c»iM 



ATA OfSimANCE AGENCY, INC 

CADirlalsnatrs 



"The T station actually 
floods," Hellendrung said 
after the meeting, noting 
that at one time, "There 
was a stream that ran under 
there...." 

The water that bubbles 
into the T parking lot is from 
remnants of that stream bur- 
ied more than a century ago 
and likely runs from Brook 
Street across Newport Av- 
enue. 

After the meeting, Hel- 
lendrung described the plans 
for a water storage tank that 
will filter and clean the wa- 
ter before it is recharged 
into the ground or released 
into the storm water system 
or used for aesthetic draws, 
such as fountains and pools 
in the center. 

Gutro, also, said that the 
heavy commuter traffic that 
backs up on Newport Ave- 
nue during commuter hours 
must be considered in plan- 
ning. 

Harrington noted that 
the concept offers additional 
parking pedestrian friendly 
areas in a center that is al- 
ready solid with "responsi- 
ble landowners and a steady 
commercial" base. 

"These are all the things 
that Wollaston deserves," 
said Harrington who said 
the ideas offered were just 
the beginning of a public 
process which will include 
open discussion and revi- 
sions. 

Harrington pledged to 
pursue the revival, "We're 



not looking for a (plan) to 
go on a shelf." 

Harrington said there 
will be an "engaged public 
process as each one of these 
layers move thorough pub- 
lic participation." 

Once the plans are re- 
viewed and revised after 
public comments, Har- 
rington expects requests 
for zoning changes, a 43-D 
designation and applications 
for grants through state and 
federal programs, as well as 
aggressive online market- 
ing. 

It's important to rein- 
vigorate the area to "make 
sure that it doesn't go into 
a decline." Harrington said, 
but added, "Economics will 
drive a lot of it." 

While the Wollaston plan 
involves no land-takings, 
road redesign or business 
relocations, the proposal 
would require zoning chang- 
es and a 43D designation of 
the area which, under Mas- 
sachusetts law, allows the 
development of incentives 
to expedite local permitting 
and zoning changes. 

The design project, val- 
ued at $50,000 to $60,000 
is part of a partnership initi- 
ated by the T to develop in- 
come on T properties. 

In addition to Sharma 
and Allen, the team in- 
cluded John Barker, Sam 
Forgue, Yang Liu, Suzanne 
Mathew, Tim Olson, and Yi- 
tian Wang. 



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Michael Mullaney In Running For Title 

Page 21 
Under 14 Baseball Team Wins Crown 

Page 22 




Tlie Quizicy 



Historic Quinc\;'s Hometown Weekly Newspaper Since 1968 




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VOL.41 No. 45 



Thursday, July 23, 2009 




AToc/i Holds Mini-Summit g 
76^ Address Wollaston Becwn 
High Bacteria Counts 

State, City 
Officials Target 
Water Pollution 



SUN SETS behind the Blue Hills as seen from Granite Links Golf Course at Quarry Hills, making a pretty postcard scent. 

Qiiincv Sun Fhoto/Rohen \ohle 

Public Interviews On 
Fire Chief Appointment Doubtful 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

Top state, regional and 
cit\ officials joined Ma)(ir 
Thomas Koch last \veck at 
a mini-summit at C'it\ Hali 
aimed at cracking the m\-.- 
teiA of recent record-break- 
ine pollution counts at Wol- 
LiNinn Beach 

■'hvervbod} has a stake 
in Wollaston," Koch '-aid ot 
the importance of the meet- 
ing prompted by an histori- 
cally high bacteria count 
of 10J>(X) at the Channing 
Street site when a 104 le\el 
is considered a safe count. 

Koch called the meeting 



after discussing the dramat- 
ic upiitk in pollution counts 
uith Ward .'^ C'it\ Councillor 
Douglas Ciutro v^ho said o! 
other recent [■ ' '•' 
^> unc t^t the ii:^, 
in hi>ti)r\." 

■"Mavor Koch pulled 
together all the ke\ ih.i;. - 
ers to help 'lUt the cit> and 
so]\c this Ob\!oush. . it '- a 
m\ster\. said hred [.aske;. . 
hxecutise Director. Mas- 
sachusetts Water Resource 
.•Xuthority (.\]WR\ , vsho 
attended the meeting a^ JiU 
Karl Pastore. Director. Har- 

i.'c'U'd On f'aiii' Jt> 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

Despite requests for a 
more "transparent" appoint-^ 
ment process by both the 
Civil Service Commission 
and the City Council, Mayor 
Thomas Koch said he does 
not plan to arrange public 
interviews of candidates for 
fire chief. 

"I'm not so sure weTl 
have public (interviews)," 



Koch said when the discuss- 
ing the appointment of a 
new fire chief last week at 
City Hall. 

Koch cited the mayor's 
duties under the city's Plan 
A government structure and 
indicated that he does not 
want to tinker with mayoral 
prerogatives. 

"Whoever is sitting in 
this seat" is responsible for 



the fire chief appointment, 
stated Koch. 

The mayor should have 
the official results of the 
most recent Civil Service 
fire chief's examination on 
or about Aug. 1, according 
to Catherine Noyes, Human 
Resource Director, Civil 
Service Commission. 

Noyes informed the Sun 
that four candidates took 



the examination on March 
21 and that the scores were 
mailed to those candidates 
on June 19 and are not avail- 
able to the public. 

Koch's decision to ad- 
here to tradition opens a 
new chapter in the already 
controversial search for a 
new fire chief, more than a 
year after the official retire- 
Corn V/ 0« Pa,?^' 10 



r 



Fire Hydrant 
Testing Starts Aug. 3 

The Quincy Fire De- Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 
partment will be testing pm for the entire month 
hydrants throughout the of August, 
city starting Monday. Aug. 
3. announces Capt. Daniel 
Gcwnan. 

Testing will be con- 
ducted Monday through 



Citizens may experi- 
ence rusty water at times 
and will need to run water 
at their faucets until the 
water clears. 
y 



25th Annual Event Brings Out Many Special People 

Houghs Neck Blood Drive Remembers Chris, Trudy Peter 



ByJOEREARDON 

Charlie Peter was busy 
working at the front table 
as he has for so many years, 
hailing out surveys for 
Wo» donors to fill out and 
thanking them for contribut- 
ing on a rainy Tuesday after- 
noon. 

The 25th annual Houghs 
Neck Community Coun- 
cil Blood Drive In Loving 
Memory of Chris & Trudy 
Peter was barely 15 min- 
utes old and already a line 
was beginning to form at the 
door of St. Thomas Aquinas 
Hall. 

Peter, a friendly man 



with a firm handshake, was 
more than a little opfimistic 
that this year's drive would 
again draw big numbers. 

"We may get over 100 to- 
day," said Peter, who point- 
ed out that the 56 donors 
who made appointments be- 
forehand, far exceeded past 
numbers from other years. 

The blood drive, which 
originally was organized 
in memory of Peter's son, 
Chris, who was killed by a 
drunk driver in 1984 when 
he was 22, also added an- 
other person to memorialize. 
Charlie's wife, Trudy Pe- 
ter, a vital cog in the blood 



drive, died of pneumonia in 
2003. 

It was Charlie who came 
up with the idea for a blood 
drive after Chris's death. 
Trudy dove right into the 
event by baking more than 
800 cookies, brownies and 
cheesecake treats for the 
donors. Charlie said her en- 
thusiasm and energy were 
unmatched. 

"Immediately my wife 
took over and was the driv- 
ing force," said Charlie. 
"(When she died) we'd had 
the drive 20 years and I was 
going to let it drop. I was 

Cont'd On Pa^e 32 




REGISTERING DONORS luesdaj at the Houghs Neck C(»mmunit\ Council BI{M>d Dri\e held 
in mcmorv of Chris and Trudy Peter are Jim McCarth\ (left I, a Quinc> firefighter and \ ice pres- 
ident of the Houghs Neck Community Council, and Charlie Peter, w ho along with his late wife. 
Trudy, established the event in memor> of their son Chris who was killed b> a drunk driver 25 
years ago. Qiiim\ Sun Fhcto Robert Sohle 



imp 

■■o 4 8 7 9 "0 « 



8 1 



C-Mart Files Appeal In Land Court - Page 3 ♦ Quincy Militia Win Home Opener - Page 23 



iwl*- 



Page2 TlM^uincySuB Thorsday, July 23^ 200^ 




GREGORY P. KODGIS (left) of Quincy recently received two academic awards from Suf- 
folk University. Presenting the awards were Sebastian Royo (center) dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences; and Dr. Anthony Merzlak, chairman of the Department of English. Kodgis 
achieved early membership to the Delta Alpha Pi Society of the College of Arts & Sciences, hav- 
ing earned a GPA of at least 3.6. He also earned membership into the University's Eta Upsilon 
Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the International English Honor Society, awarded to students for 
high achievement in English and literature. In addition, Kodgjs was voted as a year 2009 recipi- 
ent of the Stanley M. Vogel Scholarship Award, a grant bestowed on Suffolk University English 
majors who have consistently performed at the level of excellence. He will begin his senior 
year at Suffolk in the fall, studying abroad in Prague, the Czech Republic. A 2006 graduate of 
Quincy High School, Kodgis is the son of Ann Marie Kodgis and the late Paul J. Kodgis. 

Quincy Medical Center 
Cancer Walk Set For Sept. 27 

Public Invited To Kick-Ojf Meeting July 30 

The Quincy Medi- • Get information on how Sunday, Sept. 27 at Pageant 

cal Center (QMC) Cancer to become a Walk sponsor. Field in Merrymount Park, 

Walk Committee will hold • Find out how participat- Quincy. 

its kick-off meeting for the ing in the Walk can increase Proceeds of the Walk ben- 

12th annual QMC Cancer your company's visibility efit the MarieA. Curry Fund, 

Walk Thursday, July 30 at and community relations. a permanent, endowed fund 

8:30 a.m. in QMC Confer- • Pick up pledge forms, at Quincy Medical Center, 

ence Room B/C, 114 Whit- posters and other materials. focused on encouraging pre- 

well St. • Learn how to create an vention and early detection 

Anyone interest in learn- on-line fundraising web pate of cancer and enhancing ac- 

ing more about the walk is at wwwfirstgiving.com/qm- cess to vital screenings and 

welcome to attend. ccancerwalk. services to men and women. 

The meeting is an oppor- • Hear tips and creative regardless of their ability to 



Oct. 5 At Granite Links Golf Club 

Mayor's Cup To Benefit 
WoUaston Theater Revitalization 

The new Wollaston The- tio"' the Wollaston Theater together," Carey said. "It 

ater revitalization effort will Foundation, is now coming is incredibly exciting to be 

be the primary beneficiary together with Hollywood a part of this project, and 1 

of the annual Mayor's Cup producer and Quincy native know the entire city is ex 
Charity Golf Tournament 
scheduled for Oct . 5 at Gran- 



ite Links Golf Club, Mayor 
Tom Koch announced Tues- 
day. 

"It's going to require a 
huge effort to bring back 
The Wolly, and we are hop- 
ing to provide some seed 
money to get the ball roll- 
ing," Koch said. "It's an 



Kris Meyer at the helm. 

Proceeds from the golf 
tournament will almost cer- 
tainly go toward prelimi- 
nary studies on the physical 
structure of the building and 
its historical significance, 
Koch said, adding that those 
first steps will be critical in 
helping determine long-term 
plans for the theater and its 



exciting project with nearly potential uses. 

limitless potential for Wol- Discover Quincy Execu- 



laston Center and the city, 
and I am proud that we will 
be able to jumpstart the ef- 
fort with the proceeds from 
our golf outing." 

At the mayor's urging, 
the city's downtown rede- 
velopment partners, Street- 
Works LLC, purchased the 
theater to save it from the 
wrecking ball and allow the 
City to mount an effort to 
restore it into a community 
theater. 

A non-profit organiza- 



tive Director Mark Carey, 
who is helping to coordinate 
the restoration effort, said 
the response from Quincy 
and beyond has been "over- 
whelming." He said he has 
received calls from founda- 
tions, tax experts and other 
agencies, all of who may 
ultimately play a role in the 
theater's revival. 

"It has been non-stop 
since the Mayor made the 
announcement, and the piec- 
es are already really coming 



cited about it, too.' 

The 1 ,200-seat theater 
opened in 1926, but has 
been shuttered since its last 
movie played in 2003. Of- 
ficials believe the building 
will need substantial struc- 
tural renovations to be vi- 
able, with the ultimate goal 
to open it as a full functional 
theater that can host mov- 
ies, community events and 
even concerts, akin to the 
Somerville Theater or the 
Coolidge Comer Theater in 
Brookline. 

Last year, the Mayor's 
Cup raised more than 
$60,000 for several charities 
thanks to corporate sponsor- 
ships and a full field of golf- 
ers at the event. For more 
information on registering 
a foursome, sponsor a hole, 
or offer a corporate sponsor- 
ship, contact Chris Cassani 
in the Mayor Koch's office 
at 617-376-1990 or cwalk- 
er@ci.quincy.ma.us . 



Car Wash Agrees To Change Hours, 
Meet With West Quincy Neighbors 



tunity to: ideas to enhance fundrais- 

• Leam more about the ing efforts. 

annual QMC Cancer Walk • Order customized t- 

and the Marie A. Curry shirts for your walk team. 
Fund. The 12th annual QMC 

• Leam how to form a Cancer Walk will be held 
team. 



pay- 



Following a hearing be- Anthony Ruscito will meet 

fore the Quincy License with neighbors at the car 

Board, the owner of the wash, located at 12 Miller 

Super Clean Car Wash has St., Tuesday, July 28 at 3 



To register for the kick- agreed to limit the business' 



off meeting or for more 
information, call 617-376- 
5495 or email Imcculley® 
quincymc.org. 



hours of operation and meet 
with local neighbors to ad- 
dress other concerns. 

Ward 4 Councillor Jay 
Davis and car wash owner 



M SPORTSMAN'S DEN 

Bait & Tackle 

Hunting & Fisliing Licenses Sold 

Deer Check Station • Rod & Reel Repair 

Hunting Gear & Supplies • Skate Sharpening 

666 Southern Artery 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617-770-3884 





Quarry Hills 
AHiiMal Hospital 



Judie A. Paulauski DVM 

406 Willard Street • Quincy, MA 02169 

617-934-4892 

M-W-F 7:30am - 5pm 
T-Th 7:30am - 7pm / Sat 8 am - 1 pm 

Your pet's health and happiness are our #7 priority! 



p.m. 

As a result of the hcense 
board meeting, Ruscito 



"At the meeting he said he 
would do certain things 
and those things were done 
within the next 48 hours. 
He also wants to meet with 
neighbors so he can work 
with them to address other 



agreed not to operate the car concerns they may have." 
wash from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. Davis credited Drohan 

"I am very pleased with Apartment resident Rich 



the actions taken by the car 
wash owner," Davis said. 



QUrNCYSUN 

NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 

Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy Sun 
home delivery route. 

617-471-3100 



Sheehan for represent- 
ing residents and discuss- 
ing their concerns with the 
car wash owner. After the 
owner has an opportunity to 
address the concerns of the 
neighbors, he will appear 
before the License Board to 
give the board an update. 

Neighbors unable to at- 
tend the meeting can contact 
Davis at 617-834-3945. 



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jewelry. The trilliant's unique shape 
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accent side stones on three-stone 
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Tfi^irsday, JUfy 23, 2000 TtM QiMlkktSir JStm Page 3 



Seeks Asian Supermarket On Hayward Street 

C-Mart Files Appeal 
In Land Court 



By LAURA GRIFFIN 

Attorneys for C Mart Su- 
permarket, Inc., have filed 
an appeal in Land Court 
of the City Council's May 
decision to reject C Mart's 
apphcation for a Special 
Permit allowing an Asian 
supermarket on Hayward 
Street, according to City So- 
licitor James Timmins. 

Timmins said the com- 
plaint charges the applica- 
tion was denied "as a result 
of improper racial consider- 
ations." 

The case should progress 
more swiftly in Land Court 
than in superior court, ac- 
cording to Timmins who 
has already filed the city's 



response to the Land Court 
appeal . 

During the council hear- 
ings, attorney Christopher 
Harrington represented C 
Mart. In April, Harrington 
charged that racial and 
ethnic bias had negatively 
impacted and delayed the 
application process. Har- 
rington could not be reached 
for this report. 

C Mart Supermarkets 
sought a Special Permit to 
open a 23,000 sq. ft. su- 
permarket with 91 parking 
spaces at the former Boston 
Gear Works. 

From the first hearing last 
fall to the May decision, the 
issue drew hundreds of resi- 



Historical Commission 
Meets Monday At City Hall 



The Quincy Historical 
Commission will hold an 
open public meeting Mon- 
day at 7 p.m. in City Hall, 
Foy Conference Room, 2nd 
floor. 

The following hearings 
are scheduled: 

7:10p.m. 103-105 Frank- 
lin Street. The Sippy Cup 
Place- Repair and repaint 



existing awning at 

7:25 p.m. 1348 Han- 
cock St., Subway Sandwich 
Shop. Install neon sign in 
front window 

7:35 p.m. 1416 Hancock 
St., Quincy 2000, Install 
temporary navas sign for 
new satellite location. 

7:45 p.m. Other busi- 
ness. 



Little Richie's Antiques 

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Toys • Tools • Glass • Books • Radios • Pottery • Clocks 
Coins • Knives • Jewelry • Military • Records • Cameras 

Furniture * Hummels • Lladros * Royal Ooultons 
Maps & Atlases • Trains • Swords • Police & Fire Badges 



Musical Instruments • Scientific Instruments 

Oil Paintings • Oriental Rugs • Gold & Silver 

Advertising Signs * Coin Operated Machines 

Anything Unusual & Weird 



SO Hancock Street, Braintree 

7S1'380-8I65 

WWW.LlTTLERlCHIESANnQUES.COM 



PAYING TOP DOLLAR 

for your unwanted jewelrj ! 






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'appraising, 

BUYING & 
SELUNG... 



Del Greco 




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399 WASHINGTON STREET ROUTE 53 WEYMOUTH 
LOCATED OFF RT. 3. EXIT 16A. TO RT. 53N 

781.337.5069 

Hours: Monday - Friday 9-5 • Saturday 9:30-2 



dents to hearings at North 
Quincy High School and 
City Council chambers. 

Councillors voted 7-1 to 
reject the application with 
the majority citing traffic 
issues on Hancock Street 
and adjacent streets in North 
Quincy. 

Councillor Joseph Finn 
supported the application 
which had been reduced pe- 
riodically since the original 
meeting in October. 

In November. Harrington 
announced that C Mart was 
revising its plans and would 

Cont'd On Pa/^e 32 




RESCUE TEAM HO^OR^:D - Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. recently honored three Quint.\ 
firefighters with their Firemark Award. The firefighters rescued lerri Knight fr«»m the de\as- 
tuting March fire on Robertson Street that claimed her husband and two babies. After hear- 
ing barely audible breathing, the three firefighters searched through thick smr»ke in the near 
explosive basement apartment. The firefighters, center, hold their awards after the ceremon> at 
North Quincy Fire Station. From left are: Acting Chief Joseph Barron. Ma>or Thomas Koch 
with Firefighters Kenneth I.ippens. Daniel Sulli\an, Thomas Bowes. Anthonv Lallis of Libert> 
Mutual and Deput\ Fire Chief (iar\ Smyth who was super>isor on the night of the fire. 

Photo Courtesy Qiiincx Fire Department 



Michael Logan Memorial Softball Tournament Aug. 29 



Christine Cedrone Lo- 
gan and Scott R. Logan will 
be hosting the L' Annual 
Michael Logan Memorial 
Softball Tournament on Sat- 
urday, Aug. 29 beginning at 
8 a.m. at Pageant Field 

The tournament will be 
held in memory of their 



deceased son. Michael S. 
Logan, and proceeds raised 
at the event will be donated 
to Children's Hospital Bos- 
ton sNICU. 

The Logans are seeking 
donations and volunteers 
to help with the eight-team 
event. All sponsors that do- 



nate S HX) or more will have 
their name listed on the back 
of the Softball t-shirts and 
they will also be listed in 
any advertisements and; or 
press releases. Sponsorships 
must be received b\ Aug 
14.2009. 

Checks can be made pa\ - 



able to: Michael S Logan 
foundation, co Christine 
Cedrone Logan . 2 1 .McGrath 
Highway. Suite 306, Quinc\ . 
MA 02 169. 

For additional informa- 
tion, contact Scott Logan at 
617-653-2611 



Your mortgage and 
debts paid in full 
in the next 10 years. . . 

It can happen ! 



If It's part of your plan to pay off your mortgage, 
credit cards and home equity loan before you retire, 
the 10-Year Mortgage from Colonial Federal Savings 
Bank lets you make it happen. Right now, we have 
$4 million to lend in 10-Year Mortgages at a favorable 
fixed rate. It's also perfect for homeowners who 
want to borrow against their equity but don't want 
an adjustable credit line or new 30-Year loan. And 
it may be for you if you have IS"*" years left on a 
mortgage that you'd like to pay off more quickly at 
a much lower rate. It's a smart time to make your 
move. And we'll make the process quick, easy and 
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Subjea to credit approval. Escrow tax payments may change. 



Page 4 ' tlMQulxMiy'Siui Thm-sday. July », 20W 



The Quincy 



(USPS 453-060) 

Published Weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co., Inc. 

1372 Hancxjck St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Robert H. Botworth 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Boeworth, Jr. 

Founder 
1968 - 2009 

50c per copy. $25 00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$30.00 per year by mail outside Quincy - $38.00 out-of-state 

Telephone: 617-471-3100 Fax: 617-472-3963 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to; 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 021 69 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in 
advertisements but will reprint that part of an advertisement in wtiicti the typographical 
error occurs. 




Trevor's Excellent Adventure 




Moments 
in time 

THE HISTORY CHANNEL 



• On July 15, 1888, the- 
On July 26, 1775, the U.S. 
postal system is established 
by the Second Continental 
Congress, with Benjamin 
Franklin as its first post- 
master general. Franklin put 
in place the foundation for 
many aspects of today's mail 
system, including standard- 
ized delivery costs based on 
distance and weight. 

• On July 24, 1901, au- 
thor William Sydney Porter, 
otherwise known as O. Hen- 
ry, is released from prison 
after serving three years in 
jail for embezzlement from 
a bank. While in prison he 
began writing stories to sup- 
port his young daughter. 

• On July 22, 1923, John 
Dillinger joins the Navy in 
order to avoid charges of 
auto theft, but deserts within 
a few months. Dillinger's 
reputation as America's 
most notorious criminal was 
forged in a single 12-month 
period in the early 1930s, 
during which he robbed 
more banks than Jesse James 
did in 15 years. 

•On July 21, 1955, Pres- 
ident Dwight D. Eisenhower 
presents his "Open Skies" 
plan, which called for the 
United States and the Soviet 
Union to exchange maps in- 
dicating the exact location 
of every military installa- 



tion in their respective na- 
tions. The Russians rejected 
the plan. Months later, the 
Eisenhower administration 
approved the use of high-al- 
titude spy planes to conduct 
surveillance over the Soviet 
Union. 

• On July 20, 1969, step- 
ping off the lunar landing 
module Eagle, Neil Arm- 
strong becomes the first hu- 
man to walk on the moon. 
He told more than a billion 
people listening at home 
on Earth: "That's one small 
step for man, one giant leap 
for mankind." 

• On July 25, 1978, Lou- 
ise Joy Brown, the world's 
first baby to be conceived via 
in-vitro fertilization, is bom 
in Manchester, England. The 
healthy baby was delivered 
by Caesarean section and 
weighed in at 5 pounds, 12 
ounces. 

• On July 23, 1984, 

21 -year-old Vanessa Wil- 
liams, the first black Miss 
America, gives up her crown 
after a magazine announces 
plans to publish nude pho- 
tos of her. Williams sued 
the photographer and the 
magazine, but later dropped 
the suits after it was learned 
that she had signed a model 
release form at the time the 
photos were taken. 

O 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



Manet Community Health 
Awarded $719,140 Grant 
For Center Renovations 



The Manet Community 
Healtli Center, Inc. was re- 
cently awarded through the 
American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act $719,140 
from the US Dept. Health 
and Human Services, Capi- 
tal Improvement Program. 

Henry Tuttle, Manet's 
chief executive officer, said, 
"On behalf of Manet, our 
appreciation to Cong. Wil- 
liam Delahunt for his stead- 
fast support and leadership 
in Washington to help pass 



the American recovery and 
Reinvestment Act which in- 
cludes unprecedented sup- 
port for community health 
center." 

The money will be used 
for major renovations for 
the community health cen- 
ter at 110 W. Squantum St. 
in North Quincy, including a 
sprinkler system, fire alarm 
and security systems; an en- 
ergy efficient HVAC unit, 
and five new patient exam 
rooms with nursing stations 
and patient toilet. 



Trevor McCarthy of Quincy is a typical teen-ager. 
He likes sports, music and wears a baseball cap over 
brown, curly hair. 

But the 14-year-old son of Dan and Ami McCarthy of 
Penn's Hill recently had quite an adventure. An experience, 
it tums out, that he'll remember for the rest of his life. 

Trevor and another Quincy teen, 15-year-old Tom Lester, 
were among a group of nine Catholic Memorial High School 
students who traveled to Lima, Peru, as part of the Blessed 
Edmund Rice Solidarity Initiative annual mission trip. The 
BERSI is a unique learning experience that brings together 
the structure of a rigorous classroom environment with the 
richness of personal academic encounters in diverse envi- 
ronments. Besides Peru, students can select El Salvador, 
South Korea, New York and Chicago. 

The program is billed as voyages which "provide ev- 
eryone involved with extraordinarily powerful, potentially 
transformative experiences that are both intellectually and 
spiritually challenging." 

Trevor is certainly one student who can attest to that. It 
was an eye-opening and heart-warming experience. 

Over the course of eight days, the students built two 
homes for needy families in a destitute part of the city, spent 
time teaching English to students, brought much-needed 
school supplies to the school , brought medical supplies and 
worked for a day in a medical/orphanage facility. 

They also did some sight-seeing to Inca ruins, a local 
newspaper and the U.S. Embassy. 

Trevor decided to raise the necessary $2,000 to take the 
trip because some of his classmates were going and he fig- 
ured it would be fun. But more so he wanted to lend a help- 
ing hand to those less fortunate. 

"It was really great to help those people down there," he 
says modestly. 

One of the highlights of the trip was building the two 
homes for needy families. 

"We tore down the houses with a pick ax and sledge ham- 
mers and ripped apart the four walls. There was no place for 
the wood to go and then we just lit them on fire right on the 
dirt floors," Trevor recalled. 

"After that we helped shovel (the wood and ashes) out 
and then nailed together portions of the new house which 
was pre-fabricated. We also gave the families a hand re- 
building living rooms and also gave them beds and an oven 
to cook on." 

Trevor and the other classmates also visited one of the 
local schools. 

"They have a student council and we did a question and 
answer period with them. They taught Spanish to us while 
we taught English to them. A lot of the kids who went speak 
Latin so I had to translate for almost all of them because I 
take Spanish in school. It was kind of easy, kind of hard be- 
cause they talk so fast. We taught a lot of them English." 

They also had an opportunity to spend time at the offices 
of Lima's daily newspaper, La Republica. 

"We got a tour and we saw how they take pictures and 
put them in the newspaper. We actually got to see the next 
day's newspaper that was completely published and ready 
to be sent out. We also had a chance to meet some of the 
editors." 

The classmates and two chaperones stayed in a hotel that 
would not be confused with a 5-star accommodation in the 
States. 

"It was nice but like a motel. It was okay," Trevor said, 
thinking back to his home-away- from-home for those eight 
days. "The showers didn't have curtains and you couldn't 
let the water get in your mouth (for sanitary reasons). You 
couldn't even use the water to brush your teeth. You have 
use bottled water." 

One thing Trevor missed being away from home was 
clean air. 

"It's a desert climate and you need to put sunblock on 
quite frequently," he explained. "But after a while the sun- 
block starts turning black and gray from the pollution. That 
was really bad." 

Asked what he found most rewarding about his experi- 
ence, Trevor didn't hesitate. 

"The look on the mother's face after we built her house. 
They have five kids and we built them a two-room house. 
Just the look on her face after she saw that house - she was 
in shock. She kept giving us hugs; she didn't want us to 
leave. 

"It was about 10 at night and we couldn't see a thing and 




QUINCY FRIENDS Tom Lester (left) and TVevor McCarthy 
(right) with another Catholic Memorial High School classmate 
during a recent mission trip to Lima, Peru. 

we still had to put a roof on. They didn't give us enough 
tin to finish the roof but she was still jumping for joy that 
she even had a nice house for her family. All her kids were 
under 10 years old and she was just so happy. It made all of 
us feel good." 

Of course boys being boys they managed to find some 
fun downtime, too. 

"We went to some fountains that people can go swim- 
ming in. That was really fun for us." 

They also played their Peruvian counterparts in basket- 
ball. 

"I don't think you can say we even put up a fight. They 
beat us pretty bad. There were 1,000 kids all around the 
court watching the game and when they had the ball, they 
were cheering like crazy. But when we got the ball , we felt 
like the Yankees in Fenway Park. The place just went silent. 
It was fim though." 

Trevor, who tums 15 in September when he begins his 
sophomore year in the fall, is already planning a return trip. 

"I'm definitely going back. A few of us are planning to 
go back. It was a blast." 

To fund this year's trip and purchase supplies, the boys 
were asked to raise funds from family, friends and others. 
Trevor received funds from both family and friends, but 
also from the Elks and the McDonough Foundation here in 
Quincy. 

For Trevor, it was a trip that put the important things in 
life in perspective. 

He and his classmates soon realized so many of the com- 
mon amenities available here are not conmionplace in Peru. 
Things like clean air, water, modern health care and electric- 
ity.^ 

"I came back and I appreciate so much more of what I 
have here. I have a TV and a swimming pool. They don't 
even have hospitals down there. There are so many things 
that the public has here but they don't," Trevor notes. 

The teen's experience has also left a lasting impression 
with their proud parents. 

"Ami and I are very proud of Trevor and the other boys 
who made the trip," said his father, Dan. "They sign up 
thinking it's an adventure which it is but then they realize 
how much work they actually had to do. 

"We actually joked with the boys because they were 
thinking about bringing an X-Box with them to give to the 
kids in Lima. And I said 'Well, wait until you get there and 
then you can decide if you should bring an X-Box or not.' 
There's not even running water or electricity there." 

"When you see them at the airport and how much fiin 
they had and they are obviously thrilled to be home," Dan 
adds. "They were telling stories about their adventure but 
Trevor and Tonuny both said the same thing: 'I can't wait 
to go back.'" 

While Trevor has the option of choosing a different expe- 
rience next year, his mind is already made up. 

"I want to go back to Peru. I promised one of the kids I 
met down there that I would see him again next year. We 
made a lot of friends down there." 

Trevor attended St. Ann's School in Wollaston before 
enrolling at CM. Last year he played freshman football as a 
wide receiver and comerback and hockey for the Knights. A 
goalie, he hopes to suit up for the UNH Wildcats someday. 
He's also played baseball for Quincy Youth. 

His good friend Tommy Lester played freshman hockey 
with Trevor as well as freshman lacrosse for CM. 

Trevor says this is one experience he will never forget. 

And he has this message for any students who have the 
opportunity to participate in the program: 'Take it. Defi- 
nitely." 



. TJiuriKlay, Jul.v 23, 2009 Tlfte Quin«y 



Pagt 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS IS A 1948 postcard reproduction of the Wollaston 
Theatre on Beale Street in Wollaston Center. Built in 
1926, it opened as a vaudeville and silent-picture theater 
named in New Wollaston. The original Wollaston The- 
atre had operated on a small stage in the old Masonic 
Temple building to the right. About 1930 the new theater 
with 1,259 seats was upgraded to show talking movies. 
A few years after this picture was taken the vertical 
marquee shown here was replaced with the angular one 
there today. The featured movie on the marquee - Back 
to Bataan, starred John Wayne and Anthony Quinn in 
a 1945 hie about American-led guerillas in The Philip- 



pines after General MacArthur's withdrawal in 1942. 
The "Wolly," as it was affectionately known to genera- 
tions of Quincy moviegoers, was the last neighborhood 
theater in Quincy when it closed in 2003 for repairs. Its 
recent sale to the developers interested in downtown 
Quincy and the formation of the Wollaston Theater 
Foundation raises hope that this theater once again 
can become an entertainment and cultural center for 
all Quincy residents. To contact Tom Galvin, e-mail 
tmgalvin@verizon.net. 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Readers Forum 



Over 400 West Quincy Residents Oppose 'Cliff walk 2' 



On Page 3 of the July 2 
edition of Tfie Quincy Sun, 
it was noted that more than 
a dozen residents appeared 
at the March 2 City Council 
meeting to voice their op- 
position to the proposed 96- 
unit apartment building, we 
reference as "Cliff walk 2." 

We would like to point 
out that on that night of the 
meeting, the council cham- 
bers was filled to capacity 
with standing room only. 

This clearly indicates 
that significantly more than 



a dozen residents appeared 
at this meeting in opposition 
to this project. 

At the meeting we pre- 
sented a petition to the City 
Council signed by over 400 
Quincy residents opposing 
this project. 

in his inaugural address. 
Mayor Thomas Koch stated, 
"1 hear your call about over- 
development in our neigh- 
borhoods and I hear your 
concerns about traffic grid- 
lock on our streets." Mayor 
Koch also stated, "And 1 feel 



strongly that we must act to 
protect our neighborhoods- 
the very neighborhoods that 
give our city its unique char- 
acter." 

Gridlock? How about an 
"F" rating (hazardous) on 
the City's Traffic Engineer's 
report regarding this proj- 
ect? 

Mr. Connolly, former 
Ward 4 councillor and for- 
mer Quincy resident, who 
represents the developer, 
must do his job and so shall 
we! Protect our neighbor- 



hood! 

Diane Coletti. Woodc- 
liff Rd; Jim Curran. Wood- 
cliff Rd; Eileen Kelley. 
Woodcliff Rd; Marybeth 
Flora, Wesson Ave; Mari- 
lyn Lumaghini, Willard St; 
Lionel Lumaghini, Willard 
St; Rene Lumaghini, Wil- 
lard St; Anita Neville, Wil- 
lard St; Maureen Burns, St. 
Moritz Condominiums and 
Mary Eggert, St. Moritz 
Condominiums 

As Representatives of the 
West Quincy Neighborhood 



Says Selling Hancock Lot Not In City's Best Interest 



(A copy of the following 
letter sent to Quincy City 
Councillors was submitted 
by the writer for publication 
in The Quincy Sun.) 

I still feel that selling the 
Hancock Lot is not in the 
best interests of the city, this 
city at heart. Street Works 
most likely would be a good 
neighbor, however that is 
not the issue. The issue still 
comes to money and who 
stands to benefit the most. 
StreetWorks is looking at 
the Hancock Lot for its own 
financial benefit, first and 
foremost, and its potential 
future investment funds. 
The Hancock Lot belongs to 
the city, not the mayor nor 
the planning director nor the 
city council. 

It belongs to all the citi- 
zens of Quincy. The Hancock 
Lot is not excess, like and 
old, unused, empty school 



building. 1 see firsthand how 
busy it always is, even on a 
rainy Tuesday. Quincy will 
definitely have future needs 
for public space, be it a po- 
lice or fire facility, a health 
department that is acces- 
sible, or something else, etc. 
You all should be looking at 
the Hancock Lot as the last 
piece of city land and open 
space in the downtown. 

The figures you are given 
for potential revenue come 
from the developer only. 
Once you sell or give away 
a piece of land such as the 
Hancock Lot, it is gone 
forever. A long-term lease 
makes more business sense 
for the city. Every developer 
over the years has tried to 
get his or her hands on the 
Hancock Lot because it is a 
valuable piece of property. 
StreetWorks also sees the 
value as business people 



who are thinking of Street- 
Works bottom line first. 
You, as elected officials, are 
elected to serve the best in- 
terests of the voters first and 
foremost. 

The JFK Health Center 
on Hancock St. was sold be- 
cause it had a leaky roof and 
a bad heating system. It was 
built with Federal funds, but 
maintained poorly. A former 
mayor built the Ross Ga- 
rage that almost everyone is 
afraid to use because funds 
were available whether the 
actual structure was a good 
idea or not. Hasty decisions 
turned out to be costly later 
as we see from the sale of 
the JFK Health Center. 



Giving the developer ev- 
erything he wants, like some 
kind of love fest, and the de- 
sire to improve a badly ne- 
glected Downtown no mat- 
ter what is asked of the City 
Council, is not what city 
councillors were elected to 
do. 

I urge you all to look 
into the matter of disposing 
or selling or whatever the 
language is, regarding the 
Hancock Lot and give the 
voters your reasons so they 
can vote as they see fit. I 
urge the city council not to 
vote to sell the Hancock Lot 
when it comes before the 
City Council later this year. 
Arline Goodman 
Revere Rd. 




This Week 

1950 

59 Years Ago 



Hai Tran Graduates Ttifts University 

Hai Tran of Quincy re- University with a Bachelor 
cently graduated from Tufts of Arts in English. 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Overwhelming Red 
Attacks Force U.S. 
Troops To Retreat 

By FRANK McCALLEY 

Waves of fanatical North Korean troops drove elemenf- 
of the U.S. First Cavalry Division out of Yongdong narrow 
ing the American defense perimeter in Southeast Korea 
Yongdong was evacuated after a ._^_______ 

fierce daylong fight. 

North Korean Communist troops 
seized the southwestern tip of Korea 
and turned eastward toward Pusan. the 
U.S. supply port on the southeastern 
tip of the peninsula. 

Jack James, a United Press war correspondent, noted 
that, "the next week will determine whether American fort- 
es will be able to stay in Korean or be forced to withdraw. 
The troops we have there now will not be enough " (Edi- 
tor's note: U.S. forces stabilized the defense line along the 
Naktong River and held off .North Korean attacks through 
August and early September. Ihere would be a breakout 
of the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September after the Inchon 
landings. All of South Korea would be free of enemy troops 
by early October.) 

THREE MEETINGS OF THE COUNCIL 

EACH MONTH SOUGHT BY Bl RCilN 

Two afternoon meetings and one c\eninij meetinsj each 

month for the cit\ council was advocated todav b\ .\la\or 

Ihomas S. Burgin. Under present council rules the council 

meets tvMce a month, the tirst and third .Monday ^ 

■■| will advocate such a plan at the next mcetin*; of the 
council and introduce an i)rder lo that effect." said Burein 

"The business of the council has !:r<>'.\n 1 believe it is no 
longer possible to act on all the matters to come before it 
w hen there are but two meetings a mt)nth "' 
(Editor's note: Ma\or Burgin's plan tailed.) 

QUINCYIS.MS 
The Quinc) Cooperative Bank. Hancock St.. Quincy 
Center, was offering systematic savings Serial Shares, with 
an interest rate of 2 ^^'/c per annum and paid up shares in 
denominations of $2fX) w ith an interest rate of 2*^ per an- 
num. . . The Junior Bonney Lassies of the Houghs Neck Con- 
gregational Church were planning a mystery outing Misses 
Gloria Brummitt. Irene Keith and Barbara Beaumont 
were in charge of arrangements. Emily Jordan. .^ 10 Bill- 
ings Rd.. North Quincy. w on a free theater ticket in the .Mis- 
spelled Word Contest sponsored by the Strand Theater .. 
Firestone Stores. 2 School St.. on the comer of Hancock 
St.. Quincy Center, was offenng "Brake Relining Special. 
$10.95 on Any Type Car"... James R. Mclntyre. son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Mclntyre. 1 Pitts Ave. Wollaston. 
one of 325 Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps students, 
was undergoing an eight-week summer training period at 
the Marine Corps school in Quantico. Virginia. .Mclntyre. a 
student at Holy Cross College, was commissioned a second 
lieutenant in the Manne Corps upon graduation from col- 
lege... Cary Grant and Ann Shendan were appearing in "1 
Was a Male War Bride " at the Adams Theater; School St. 
Johnny Weissmuller was also appearing in the ".Mark of the 
Gorilla". . . The Quincy Market, 16 Chestnut St.. was offer- 
ing "A Sensational 2-Day Value. Live Chicken Lobsters for 
43 Cents a Pound" . Quincy Granite Motors, 460 Adams 
St.,was selling 'Studebaker Champion. 6- Passanger.2-Door 
Custom Sedans for $1 J560.30"... Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. 
Riggs, 312 Belmont St., celebrated their 45** wedding an- 
niversary at a dinner party at the Winfield House. . . Seaman 
Apprentice Carl F. Hammerle, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Carl F. Hammerle of 77Teme Rd. Adams Shore, completed 
recruit training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center 
and will be then assigned to duty with the Pacific Fleet... 
Quincy firefighter Joseph P. Malvesti assisted in the res- 
cue of a Boston man from drowning at Houghton's Pond . . 
Doughnuts w ere selling for 29 cents a dozen at the Mohican 
Market. Chestnut St . Quincy Center... Rep. Charles W. 
Hedges announced his candidacy for state senator in the 
Quincy-Braintree districts. Rep. Hedges is kxiking to suc- 
ceed longtime Senator John D. MacKay w ho declined to 
seek re-election. 

KEEPING LP WITH THE RED SOX 
The Red So.x. led by second baseman Bobby Doerr who 
belted his 15"" home run of the season, swept a series with 
the St. Louis Browns. The Red Sox were in fourth place in 
the eight-team American League with a 51-39 record. 6 'r 
games behind the league-leading Detroit Tigers. 



^1 



■p 



s.^- 



Page 6 Tlx9 Qi&incy Siu& Thursday, July 23, 2009 



Arts & Ertertairnert 



Featuring Acclaimed 22 Year-Old Cellist 

Boston Landmarks Concert 
Tonight At Beale House 

Jacqueline Choi, a 22 
year-old cellist, recent Mas- 
ter's Degree graduate of the 
New England Conservatory 
and recipient of the Conser- 
vatory's President's Award, 
will peform tonight (Thurs- 
day) with the Boston Land- 
mark Orchestra at the Beale 
Estate in Quincy at 7 p.m. 
(135 Adams St. 

Jacqueline Choi has per- 
formed as a soloist with the 
Boston Symphony, the New 
England Philharmonic and 
Korea's Bucheon Philhar- 
monic. 

In 2008, Choi debuted in 
Seoul, South Korea, where 
she lived for eight years, at 
the Kumo Art Hall and was 
invited to play at the Musee 
de Louvre in Paris. 

In the past, Choi has per- 
formed with renowned art- 
ists Itzhak Perlman, Donald 
Weilerstein, William Sharp 
and Nicholas Mann. Recent- 
ly, Choi has programmed 
her own transcriptions of 
the Schubert, Schumann and 



Summerfest Outdoor Concert 
Series Continues At Amphitheatre 




Free outdoor concerts 
for the 2009 Summerfest 
Concerts Series continued 
Wednesday, July 22, with 
The Spring Hill Rounders 
performing Bluegrass at the 
Ruth Gordon Amphitheatre 
in Merrymount Park. 

Concerts begin at 7 p.m. 
and admission is free. Adults 
and families are welcome. 
For more information, call 
the Quincy Parks Depart- 
ment at 6 1 7-376- 1 25 1 . 

Also scheduled to per- 



nes: 

July 29: Vento Chiaro, a 
quintet comprised of flute, 
oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and 
French horn. (In the event of 
inclement weather, this con- 
cert will be held in the Cove 
Fine Arts Center at Eastern 



folk songs, spirituals, gospel 
songs and Broadway tunes. 
Under the direction of 
Quincy musician Delvyn 
Case, the Concert Series is 
sponsored by the City of 
Quincy and a consortium of 
local businesses and individ- 



Nazarene College on Wen- uals including, Quincy Point 

dell Ave. Music Academy, Eastern 

Aug. 5: Quincy Summer Nazarene College's LEAD 

Singers, led by conductor Program, Lisa's Dance Stu- 

Delvyn Case. The Quincy dio. Campus KinderHaus, 

Summer Singers is a 50-per- Old Colony Music Together 

son community choir that and Councillors Jay Davis 



THE BOSTON LANDMARKS Orchestra will perforin a con- 
cert tonight (Thursday) at Beale House, 135 Adams St., Quin- 
cy, featuring Jacqueline Choi, a 22-year-old Korean- American 
cellist. 



Strauss lieder. 

Choi's first concert with 
the Orchestra, entitled Vien- 
nese Masters, explores the 
rich history of Classical and 
Romantic pieces inspired by 
Vierma, Austria and will also 
feature Johannes Brahms' 
Symphony No. 1 in C mi- 
nor. Op. 68. 

Charles Ansbacher, Con- 
ductor and Artistic Director, 
founded the Boston Land- 
marks Orchestra in January 



2(X)1 to perform free con- 
certs in significant histori- 
cal, geographical, and archi- 



form during the concert se- performs classical music, and Doug Gutro. 

'Go For The Stars' Friday At Library 

The Thomas Crane Pub- ity, rockets and much more. NASA personnel on sev- 

lic Library will host "Go for Volunteers from the audi- eral educational projects, 

the Stars" Friday at 10 a.m. ence, dressed in astronaut is a certified flight instruc- 

in the Main Library Large flight suits, will perform live tor and has helped with the 



Meeting Room. 

The program, open to the 



tectural settings throughout public, will be presented by 

the Greater Boston area. Gary Pozzato. 

For more information Come and meet Robo 

about the Boston Land- the friendly robot who talks, 

marks Orchestra, visit www. moves and interacts with the 

LandmarksOrchestra.org or audience; learn about living 

call 617-520-22(X). in space, orbits, micrograv- 



demonstrations and experi- 
ments. 

Traveling throughout 
New England since 1992, 
Pozzato has shared knowl- 



manufacture of equipment 
for NASA Space Suit, Space 
Shuttle Orbiter and the In- 
ternational Space Station. 
This program is for chil- 



edge of the space program dren ages 5 and older and is 

with numerous schools, li- sponsored by a grant from 

braries and civic groups, the South Coastal Bank 

He has worked closely with C.A.R.E.S. program. 



Sparky 's Puppet Show July 27 At Adams Shore Library 



COPELAND PACKAGE STORE, INC. 

BEER,WINES & LIQUORS 




Dennis Carson 
273 Copeland St. 
T hsBeit In Quincy, Ma 02 1 69 

^Ptfti (617) 471-5418 •(617)472-7012 



On Monday, July 27 at 
2 p.m. at the Adams Shore 
Branch join the fun as 

Sparky's Puppets will 
perform "Stories from Outer 
Space" Monday, July 27 at 
2 p.m. at the Adams Shore 



Branch of the Thomas Crane 
Public Library. 

The event is open to the 
public. 

In this featured story, 
three colorful space aliens 
travel to earth in their flying 



saucer. They visit the shop of ages 3 and older accompa- 

a hard-working toy maker, nied by an adult and is es- 

intent on creating mischief, pecially suited to children 

But the clever shopkeeper ages 3-6. 
uses three magic wishes to The event is sponsored by 

outwit them. The Friends of the Thomas 

This show is for children Crane Library. 



Paintings, Portraits And Prints At Adams Historical Park 



*Too Good to Pass Up!" - htddenboston com 



TWIN LOBSTER SPECIAL 

with potato, corn & drawn butter 

$ ^ Q95 While they last (dine-in only) 

Support your local fishermen 
all lobsters bought from quincy boats! 

FISHERMAN'S PLATTER 

95 



The Adams National 
Historical Park curator will 
host a behind-the-scenes 
tour of paintings, portraits, 
prints and photographs that 
illuminate the Adams family 
Saturday, July 25 at 2 p.m. 

The tour, which will also 



include the Adams Family 
historic homes and their il- 
lustrious history, will be 
held at Adams NHP, 135 
Adams St., Quincy. 

The collection provides 
insight into the people who 
produced, posed for, pur- 



chased, and preserved one 
of the nation's preeminent 
collections of fine and deco- 
rative arts. 

This special insider's 
look at the Park's collection 
of historic images is free and 
open to the public. Space is 



limited, however, on the cu- 
rator's tour and reservations 
are required. 

For more information, or 
to make a reservation, call 
the Visitor's Center at 61 7- 
770-1175. 



Art-To-Go Rocket Doorhangers Project At Library 



$14 



Golden fried scrod, whole clams 
and scallops, fresh daily form 
the Boston Fish Pier. 

NAtlVE StEAMERS 

$Q95 

with drawn butter and broth... w 
SIRLOIN TIPS (OR TURKEY TIPS) 

Our Famous Best Seller, Still Just... mm 

STUMP TIM TRMA EVBiy SUNMY AT 6 ra 
N0CHAR6ET0PUY-4«IZESfn 

H Hotdogs during every Red Sox game 



l^ Dcs.Moini's Rd. • Qiiiiicv Point 
• liiki'oiit 617-786-9siM 

(|i(|\U(ii till' Slii|)\;n(l and 
KXM) SoiMIk 111 \rlir\ Sinior ( enter) 



The Thomas Crane Pub- 
lic Library offers an "Art- 
to-Go" series of drop-in art 
activities that travel through- 
out Quincy. 

Supplies for this week's 
project are available Mon- 



day at the Main Library; 
Tuesday at the Adams Shore 
Library; Wednesday at the 
North Quincy Library and 
Thursday at the WoUaston 
Library. 

Drop-in any time from 



2 to 4 p.m. to make a craft. 
Projects are open ended to 
accommodate a wide age 
range. They are easy enough 
for toddlers and preschool- 
ers to do with an adult's help 
and free form enough for 



school age children to add 
their own personal touch. 

The project during the 
week of July 27 is Rocket 
Doorhangers. 

The program is sponsored 
by Friends of the Library. 



14th Annual ^^k 

ARTS HFFAIR 

AT MARINA BAY 

August I'* - 2"** 

Saturday, 10-8pm 
Sunday, lO-Spm 

Judging Saturday: 10:00-Noon 
Awards Ceremony: 2:00 in the Cafeteria 
Categories include: 

• Oil and Acrylic • Photography 

• Watercolor • Mixed Media 

• Drawing • Sculpture 




Exhibition features members of 14 Art Associations: 



' Braintree 
' Brockton COA 
' Canton 
' Hull Artists 
Studio Connection 
' Hyde Park 

' Independent South Shore 
Artists Circle (formerly 
Brockton Artist's Circle) 



Milton Art Museum 

Needham 

Norwood 

Quincy 

South Boston 

So. Shore Arts Center 

West Roxbury 

Weymouth 



wwyy^^sTEAKTiRs ,c:o]vi 



Free Parking • Free Admission • Raffles • Art Demonstrations www.artsaffair.org 

Marina Bay Corporate Park, 500 Victory Rd., Marina Bay, Quincy • Cafeteria, Lobby, and Outdoors. 



Hundreds of works of art, fourteen local art associations, one great spot, 



^: !. 



ThurMlay, July 23, 2009 The Qvkix^Cfy Sun Pajji' 7 



Social 



Free Tour Of Marine Life 
In Quincy Bay Saturday 



The Quincy Park Depart- 
ment will offer a free tour of 
marine life in Quincy Bay 
with guide Peter Fifield Sat- 
urday, July 25 at 7:30 a.m. 

Participants will wade out 
to a sandbar at low tide to 
search under rocks for lob- 
sters, crabs and other marine 
life. Because of sharp shells 
and mud, it is important to 
wear boots, tie-on shoes or 



sneakers. 

After the tour, there will 
be an optional 45 minute 
DVD, "The Realm of the 
Lobster." 

Those taking part in Sat- 
urday's tour should meet 
at the Bayswater Boatyard 
parking lot on Bayswater 
Road. 

For more information, 
call 617-472-0799. 



Free Screening Of ^ WallE' 
At Crane Library July 30 




Families are invited to 
a free screening of the ac- 
claimed animated feature 
film "Wall-E" Thursday, 
July 30 at 7 p.m. at the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary, 40 Washington St., 
Quincy. 



Directed by Andrew 
Stanton, the 103-minute 
movie is rated G. 

The screening is spon- 
sored by the Friends of the 
Thomas Public Library. 

For more information, 
call 617-376-1301. 



TOM AND BARBARA CHtiNtY of Quincy recently celebrat- 
ed their 60th wedding anniversary with family. At right, Mr. 
and Mrs. Cheney on their wedding day June 25, 1949 at St. 
Ann's Church in Dorchester. 

Tom And Barbara Cheney 
Celebrate 60th Anniversary 




31 Receive Curry Degrees 



Thirty-one Quincy resi- 
dents recently graduated 
from Curry College in Mil- 
ton. 

They are: 

Cindy Bonner, Bachelor 
of Science degree; Michael 
Bosco, Master of Educa- 
tion; Scott Cooper, Bach- 
elor of Arts; Eileen Cotto, 
Bachelor of Science; Alysia 
Dimuzio, Bachelor of Arts; 
Diane Gilbody, Bachelor of 
Science; Michael Haines, 
Bachelor of Arts; Melissa 
Hanna, Bachelor of Arts; 
Scott Harrison, Bachelor 
of Science; Bonnie Hirtle, 
Bachelor of Arts; Marie La- 
Guerre, Bachelor of Arts; 
Amy Linstrom, Bachelor 
of Science; Caitlin Lynch, 
Bachelor of Science; Sharon 
Man, Bachelor of Science; 
Mary Miller, Bachelor of 



Arts; Bryan Resnick, Mas- 
ter of Arts in Criminal Jus- 
tice; and Teresita Valezquez, 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Also, Meghan Foley, 
Bachelor of Science; Alau- 
dia Furtado, Bachelor of 
Arts; Paul Matthews, Bach- 
elor of Arts; Jena McEach- 
em. Bachelor of Science; 
Alicia Morgan, Bachelor of 
Arts; Jeanne Sheehan, Bach- 
elor of Science; Denitsa Vat- 
eva. Bachelor of Arts; mark 
Cimildoro, Bachelor of Arts; 
Robert Gardner, Bachelor of 
Arts; Jarrod Reino, Bache- 
lor of Science; Joel Salituri, 
Master of Arts in Criminal 
Justice; Nison Wong, 3ach- 
elor of Arts; Joarme Halla- 
han. Bachelor of Science; 
and Jennifer McDonough, 
Bachelor of Science. 



Tom and Barbara Cheney 
celebrated their 60th wed- 
ding anniversary June 25 
with their family. 

Thomas and Barbara 
Cheney were married June 
25, 1949 at St. Ann's Church 



community. Together they 
have a long history of lead- 
ership and volunteerism in 
community, civic, and faith 
initiatives. Their devotion 
to each other is a model of 
a blessed marriage and love 



River Bay Club 
'Cruise For A Cause' Aug. 27 



in Dorchester. They raised everlasting, 
seven children, and enjoy Barbara and Tom were 

their 15 grandchildren and honored by Mayor Tom 

11 great grandchildren. Koch with a proclamation 

Barbara and Tom con- making June 25, 2009 Tom 

tinue to exemplify commit- and Barbara Cheney Day in 

ment and dedication to their the City of Quincy. 
marriage, family, faith and 

Hoi Chgi Ng Framingham Graduate 

Hoi Chi Ng of Quincy with a Master of Science 

recently graduated from degree. 
Framingham State College 



The River Bay Club of 
Quincy will hold its second 
annual "Cruise for a Cause'" 
dry docked at the Water 
Club in Marina Bay Thurs- 
day, Aug. 27 at 5 p.m. 

Festivities will include 
a DJ and dancing, raffles 



and a silent auction, Hors 
d'oeuvres will be provided 
by River Bay Club. 

Tickets are S30 per per- 
son. 

For more information, 
call Geri Dussault at 617- 
472-4457. 



Erica Schmidt Graduates FSC 

Erica A. Schmidt of College with a Master of 
Quincy recently graduated Arts degree, 
from Framingham Slate 



Molly Licari On 

Molly A. Licari of Quin- 
cy, a member of the Class 
of 2012 at Siena College in 
London ville, NY, has been 
named to the Dean's List for 
the spring semester. 



Siena Dean's List 

Molly is majoring in 
psychology with a minor in 
French. 

She is a 2008 graduate of 
Archbishop Williams High 
School in Braintree. 



nnji 



ttmm 



tmmM 



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Pages Tke QxLincy Sixn Thursday, July 23, 2009 




NORTH QUINCY HIGH School cafeteria was decorated in a tropical theme for the all-night, 
substance free, after-prom party which followed the senior prom held May 8. 



GAME AREA set up in the North Quincy High School gym was a popular spot at the school's 
recent after-prom party. 



North Quincy H.S. Senior Stayout After Prom Success 



The North Quincy High 
School Senior Stayout Com- 
mittee recently held their 
all-night, substance-free, 
after-prom party at the high 
school immediately follow- 
ing the senior prom on May 
8. 

This was the 13"' year of 
this special event and it was 
exceptional. The commit- 
tee was fortunate enough to 
have so many businesses, 
organizations, politicians 
and parents volunteer so 
much of their time and 
make contributions to help 
us make this year's event 
the best ever! 

The committee was faced 
with the overwhelming task 
of having to raise a great deal 
of money in a short amount 
of time when we lost all of 
its decorations due to a burst 
pipe in mid January at the 
high school. Although Hon- 
eywell was not responsible 
for the burst pipes, they still 
made a substantial contribu- 
tion to the Senior Stayout 
Committee to help assist in 
the fundraising efforts. 

Committee members 
held a last minute fund- 
raiser at the Furnace Brook 
Golf Course in April that 
was organized by one of 
the NQHS senior parents, 
Sandy Verhault. Her quick 
action and hard work re- 
ally paid off. The event was 
pulled together in less than 
two weeks time and all the 
food, raffle items and DJ 
were donated by parents and 
businesses. 

Approximately $3,500 
was raised for the stayout 
committee. 

This year the committee 
again transformed the high 
school, however, members 
gave each room its own 
theme. This was all made 
possible by the creative ge- 
nius of our Decorating Co- 
ordinator, Tracey Brooks. 
She didn't see the loss of the 
decorations as a nightmare 
as the rest of us did; she saw 
it as a "blank canvas" and a 
way to start fresh with new 
ideas and new themes. She 
definitely outdid herself and 
the school looked amazing! 
The senior class and their 
dates waJked into a lobby 
that looked like something 



out of Hollywood with the 
red carpet treatment, VIP 
entrances, balloon arches 
and spotlights on them as 
they entered the school. 

The Atrium was turned 
into a full casino with ev- 
erything from Black Jack, 
Texas Hold Em', Roulette 
Wheel, Money Wheel and 
Cash Cube. There was a 
Movie Viewing area where 
students could sit, relax and 
eat ice cream while they 
watched a slide show of 
school memories put to mu- 
sic by Class President, Lau- 
ren Brooks. 

The Cafeteria was turned 
into a Hawaiian Paradise 
with Tiki Huts, lanterns, 
surf boards and grass skirts. 
There was a wide variety of 
food, drinks, desserts and 
an ice cream sundae bar 
to select from. There was 
a game show mania setup 
which works on the same 
premise as Jeopardy, where 
there were four student 
contestants that answered 
silly questions to music and 
could win prizes. 

The students could then 
look to the backside of the 
Cafeteria that had been made 
to look like they could take 
a stroll through the streets 
of Paris where there was a 
skyline outlined in white 
lights. There were French 
Cafe's and Raiders Cafe 
where they found Caricature 
Artists, Tattoo Artists, and 
Tarot Card Readers. 

The Hunt Street lobby 
was decorated to look like 
a Sock Hop with oversized 
records, fountain drinks and 
a black and white checkered 
dance floor where the stu- 
dents could dance to a DJ 
under a fantastic light show. 

The gym housed all the 
large inflatable games, ob- 
stacle courses, bungee run, 
large inflatable Twister 



stm 

GoinM 
Strong! 



Game, Professional Race 
Car Simulators, Air Hockey, 
Dance Dance Revolution, 
Guitar Hero, Wii, and Bas- 
ketball. 

The prizes this year were 
by far some of the biggest 
and best. The students 
needed to be present in or- 
der to win the big "end of 
the night" prizes, this is 
how we keep them there and 
keep them safe. Some of 
the big prizes ranged from 
Red Sox tickets, GPS, dorm 
refrigerators, digital cam- 
eras, 26" flat screen TV, and 
a Lap Top computer just to 
name a few. 

All in all, there was defi- 
nitely something for every- 
one and most of the students 
who filled out the survey 
stated that '"there was so 
much to do, 1 couldn't get to 
everything!" 

The after prom party is 
chaperoned. 

The committee would 
like to give a special thanks 
to Principal Earl Metzler 
for accojnmodating all of 
their needs, everything from 
fundraising efforts, school 
access, and his unwavering 
support all year long. The 
office, kitchen and custodial 
staff were absolutely fantas- 
tic to work with. 

Committee members also 
gave special recognition to 
Linda Cibotti, Deb Golden. 
Gingi Fidalgo, and Mary 
Jane Callahan. Also rec- 
ognized and thanked were 
Bob Burke, the Shop Room 
teacher who has given us 
a large storage room with 
shelving to house our new 
decorations located within 
the shop room. 

The committee thanks 
everyone who participated 
in one way or another to the 
success of the After Prom 
Event! 




For more 
information, 




,x\\\\\^^fl 





NORT 




REGISTRATION AREA in the lobby of North Quincy High School resembled a Hollywood 
premier night including a VIP entrances, a red carpet and balloon arches. 




NORTH QUINCY HIGH School parents practice their gaming skills at the roulette table inside 
the school's atrium which was turned into a full casino at the afler-prom party. 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM !■■■■■ 

HLL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 




1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
I ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $25.00 

[ J 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $30.00 | ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
I ] 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $38.00 



rhursda>, Jul> 23, 2(M)9 Tlie Quincy Stia Pajit' ^ 






Norths Quinfy H^k School Senior Stay Out 200^! 



I 



^ t 



^ Each year parents, local businesses and associations 

and manv others make sure that our 

graduating seniors enjoy a fun-filled and 

safe after-prorn all nighter. 



This year, the 13th vear of this \er\ special e\<*nt. \\a> 
exceptional. So manv peoph' step{)ed forward to help the 
Senior Stayout Committee o\ercome their loss of their 
decorations and gave of their time and generosit\ . To all 
involved, thank you so much — up couldn't have done it 
without your help! 



DISTINCTION 



Applebees 

Beechwood Knoll School PTO 

Boston Bowl 

Cabot Cheese 

Chipotle Mexican Grill 

Coffee Break Cafe 

Colleen Collins 

Domino's Pizza 



Eastern Bank Charitable Foundation 

Furnace Brook Golf Course 

GAP Foundation 

Granite Links 

Honeywell 

IBEW Local 103 

In Control Advanced Driver Training 

John Robert Powers School System 



Office of District Attorney 

William R. Keating 
MFS 

Mayor Thomas Koch 
Stephen MacDonald. DMD 
Earl Metzler, Principal, NQHS 
Milton Fruit Center. Inc. 
NQHS Parent Advisory Council 



NQHS School Store 
John "Okie" O'Connel! Fund 
Roche Brothers Supermarkets. I 
Squantum School PTO 
Sterling Golf Management. Inc. 
Stop & Shop 
Walmart Foundation 
Dr. Allan \'acubian 



HIGH HONORS 

AAA 

Balducci's House of Pizza 

Bath & Body Works 

Boston Red Sox Organization 

F.X. White Electrical, Inc. 

Francis Parker Elementary School 

Irish Pub 

Mantis Plants & Flowers 

NQHS Kitchen 

Panera Bread 

Quincy Athletic Club 

Quincy Education Assoc. Inc. 

South Shore YMCA 

Super Chef 

Super Fitness 

The Clam Box 

The Ninety-Nine Restaurant 

This Takes the Cake 

HONORS 

5 Wits Boston 

Abdon Service Station, Inc. 

Alumni 

Altrusa International of Quincy 

Anthony Palma Hair Stylist 

Aura Salon 

Build-A-Bear 

Bruce Ayers, Representative 

Bank of America Matching Funds 

Nancy Barron Asst. Principal 

Beechwood Knoll School 
Bates & Riordan, LLP 
Beechwood Knoll School PTO 
Michael Bellotti, Norfolk 

County Sherriff 
Beni Cafe 
Boston by Foot 

Brady Academy of Irish Dance 
Jo- Ann & Rick Bragg 
Brigham's 

Broad Meadows School PTO 
Brockton Rox Pro Baseball 
Bugaboo Creek 
Building #19 Inc. 
Furnace Brook Golf Club 
Captain Fishbones 
CARA Care, Home Care Agency 



Carmine's Cafe 

Cathay Pacific 

Central Middle School 

Century 2 1 Abigail Adams Agency 

Charles Riverboat Company 

Cheesecake Factory 

China Pearl 

Patricia Chou 

Christine's Day Spa 

Coca Cola 

Thomas & Lisa Collins 

Colonial Federal Savings Bank 

Community Pediatrics 

Kevin Coughlin, Ward 3 Councillor 

Covais Law Offices 

Cracker Barrel 

Crocker Electrical Company, Inc. 

D'Angelos 

Dairy Freeze 

James H. Davis, Ward 4 Councillor 

Dr. Richard DeCristofaro 

Dependable Cleaners 

Dick's Sporting Goods 

Phyllis Dixon 

Dolbec, McGrath & Bennett Attorneys 

East Chinatown Restaurant 

Eatin' Healthy 

Eagan's Sunoco 

Fl Boston 

Family of Emily Histin 

Joseph Finn, Councillor-at-Large 

First Baptist Church of Wollaston 

First Church of Christ Scientist 

Fitness Unlimited 

Ken & Marcia Garber 

Deb Golden, NQHS 

Goodfellas Barber Shop 

Granite Rail 

Great Chow 

Greater Quincy Council 

#2259 K of C 
Douglas Gutro, Ward 5 
Harbor Express 
Hingham Endodontics 
Illusions Salon 
Jack n' Jill Child Care 
Diane Jackson 

James J. Sullivan Ins. Agency 
Lamberts Rainbow Emit 
La Paloma Mexican Restaurant 



Maureen Leary-Jago 
Lincoln Hancock School PTO 
Little Duck Thai Restaurant 
Mary & Michael Lorman 
Lydon Chapel for Funerals 
Ann Mahoney, School Committee 
Pam Mateu, former V.P. NQHS 
David McCarthy, School Committee 
Michael E. McFarland, Councillor 
Merrymount Schoot PTO 
Micaela's Daycare 
Milton Pediatric Associates 
Montclair School PTO 
Montillio's Bakery & Cake Shop 
Nancy & John Moreschi 
Senator Michael W. Morrissey 
Mr. Chan's 
Mrs. Fields 
Kevin Murphy 
National Amusement Inc. /Showcase 

Cinemas 
Neponset Circle Car Wash 
New Hampshire Fisher Cats 
Newbury Comics 
NQHS Baseball Boosters 
Outback Restaurant 
Mona Page 
Papa Gino's 

Dennis & Michelle Pateras 
Patrick White Foundation 
Patriot Cinemas 
Ann Mane Phelan 
Point Webster PTO 
Donna Pound 
Patricia & Michael Powers 
Quincy After School Child Care Inc. 
Quincy Auto Driving School 
Quincy Car Wash 
Quincy Dynasty 
Quincy Firefighters Local #792 
Quincy Municipal Credit Union 
Quincy Pediatric Associates 
Quincy School-Community Partnership 
Quincy Traffic Superv isors 
Quincy Youth Baseball 
Quincy Youth Hockey Assoc. Inc. 
Quincy Youth Soccer League 
Regina Russell's Tea Room 
Roger Williams Zoo 
Sacred Hearth Parish 



Sacred Heart School PTO 
Sandy's Pet Grooming 
Gloria Schmid 
Sonoma Spa 
Siro's 

Six Flags New England 
Skyline Restaurant 
South Coastal Bank 
South Shore Car Wash 
Squantum \'outh Baseball 
Sterling Middle School PTO 
Storm Youth Football 
Beth Stevens & Family 
Joseph & Donna Taylor 
TD Bank North Garden 
Tedeschi Food Shops 
Texas Roadhouse 
The Image Connection 
The Inn at Bay Pointe 
Toddler Tech Preschool 
Tony's Clam Shop 
Touchless Car Wash 
Uno Chicago Grill 
Vin Moscardardelli Basketball 

Tournament 
Water Transportation 
Water Wizz 

Willard Veterinarv Clinic 
Wollaston Beautv' Box 
Wollaston Church of the Nazare 
Wollaston School PTO 
Yellow Cab of Quincy 

He would like to thank the pan 
teachers and staff of SQHS for 
time, dedication and generosity 

We would like to give a "specia 
to those parents that went abow 
beyond this past year as well as 
thanks and ^farewell" to the Se 
Parent Committee members wh 
be returning next year. You wi. 
sorely missed and we have big s 
tofiill 



The Senior Stayout Committee, Nortli Quincy High School, 316 Hancocic Street, No. Quincy, MA 02171 



PaijrlO TheQwincySmx Ihursda.v.Julv 2.t.2U09 

Public Interviews On 
Fire Chief Appointment Doubtful 



State, City Officials 



Cont'd From Pa^e I 

ment of Chief Timothy Pet- 
tinelh. 

Pettinelli notified Koch 
on May 21, 2008 that he 
would retire on July 15. 
2008. Following Pettinelli 's 
retirement. Koch appointed 
Deputy Chief Joseph Barron 
as Acting Chief. 

Koch offered the posi- 
tion of fire chief to two can- 
didates on the existing Civil 



While Commissioners portance of ensuring a fair 
upheld Koch's decision, and transparent selection 
they did question Koch's process in choosing its next 



Target Water Pollution 



Cont 'd From Page I 



appointment of Barron as Fire Chief and will incorpo- bor Region, Department of 
"acting chief while a Civil rate the Commission's sug- 



Service list was still active. 
Commissioners also is- 
sued the following advice 
which was adopted almost 
entirely in a City Council 
resolution. "We urge the 
City to embark on a trans- 
parent selection process to 



Service list in 2008. but they '^"'"'"^ ^ '^"'^ ''^ *^''' P'»> 



turned it down. Koch, then, 
called for a new examina- 
tion. 

The remaining candidate. 
Deputy Chief Gary Smyth, 
challenged Koch's decision 
to call for a new list, as he 
was still eligible. Smyth 
filed a complaint with the 
Civil Service Commission. 



among all eligible candi- 
dates and the public " 

Commissioners then rec- 
ommended an outside re- 
view panel and public final 
interviews that are broad- 
cast on the local cable ac- 
cess channel. 

The decision concluded. 
"We are confident that the 
City will understand the im- 



gestions...." 

Councillor Joseph Finn 
who proposed the council 
resolution said this week 
that the council never in- 
tended to infringe on the 
mayor's prerogatives. 

"1 don't think the mayor's 
discretion should be limited 
in any way," Finn said, add- 



Conservafion and Recre- 
ation (DCR) and 14 other 
state, MWRA and city of- 
ficials. 

By the meeting's end, 



bling," Koch said, adding 
the goal was to identify 
the causes whether it's the 
"drains that go into the bay" 
or birds, animals or pets. 

Gutro discounted expla- 
nations that June's near dai- 



10 Residents On WPI Dean's List 



MWRA officials pledged ly rain caused the problem. 

to begin dye-tesfing their Mike Morris, spokesmen 

sewer pipe, city official an- for the MWRA, 

nounced plans to inspect this week that the results 

municipal drainage systems, of the first dye testing were 

and DCR officials will con- negative, suggesting that 

ing that the resolufion was tinue daily monitoring of the MWRA sewage leaks are 

"not intended to limit his beaches and flagging of hot not the culprit, 
(authority)." spots when necessary. However, Morris said 

Finn said the purpose of Gutro described reports the MWRA will conduct 

the open hearings would be of 4000, 5000 and 9000 this another dye test during two charge, occurs within min- 

to "give greater confidence summer at Channing Street tidal cycles. In addition, the utes of the taking of a test 

to the general public" and and other Wollaston sites, agency will provide techni- sample, thus skewing the 

He believed the causes could cal support systems for the overall count. 

be a sewer pipe, "a boat or a city and will add fecal coli- While Wollaston Beach 

cluster of boats." form testing which should has experienced problems, 
"We've never seen such 



lisle attended the meefing, 
but both believe that rain 
caused at least some of the 
pollution. 

"It's not surprising," said 
Berman who called June 
as the 'wettest June in his- 
tory." 

"That kind of number 
reported means one of three things," 
said Berman explaining that 
a bad test could spike the 
bacterial count, a broken 
pipe or an illegal discharge. 

Berman said that a bad 
test might occur when an 
event, such as a boat dis- 



"avoid some of the infight- 
ing if it's an open and trans- 
parent process." 



Ten local students have 
been named to the Dean's 
List at Worcester Polytech- 
nic Institute. 

They are: 

Donald Ga.xho. son of 



[ 



' ALWAYS BUYING 
NEW & OLD 

TAJ 

COINS 

and 

STAMPS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, M.4 02I69 

479-1652 

Complete Line of Supplies 
Free Estimates 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gaxho, 
Chaoran Xie. son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Wai Ming Chan. 
Billy Zhong. son of Mr. Wie 
Zhong. Nhi Dao. daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Suong Q. 
Dao. Adam Tragellis, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Stratton G. 
Tragellis. 



Also. Xiaowen Zhen. 
daughter of Xiaowen Zhen, 
Xiaolin Zhen, daughter of 
Dayuan Zhen and Yuping 
Song. Tony Chou. son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Te Hsiung 
Chou, Alex Kuang, son of 
Mrs. and Mrs. Qi Kuang, 
and Yiming Wu. 



numbers." said Gutro. "Let's 
hope it's an anomaly." 
Those high counts re- 



identify the source of pollu- 
tion, such as animal, bird or 
human waste. 

"It's a mystery," Morris 



there have been major im- 
provements up until this 
year, according to Berman 
who provided statistic from 



gut would be it's 
better," said Ber- 



Three On Saint Joseph's Honors List 

Three local students have semester, 
been named to the Honors They are: Lynn Davis, 

List at Saint Joseph's Col- Mary Kate Gibson and Erin 

lege of Maine for the Spring Brady. 



verse a four-year trend to- said of the high counts after 2005 through 2008. 

years of progress. 

The city is trying to co- 
ordinate efforts among the 
agencies and city depart- 
ments, according to Engi- 
neer Shawn Hardy of the 

Department of Public Works improved by more than 50% 
(DPW). in 2006 and 2007 over the 

In respon.se to reports 2005 counts, 
of the meeting, Brian Carl- However, the number 

cy leaders, private engineers isle who heads up the city's showed increases in poor or 
and city officials to City Hall sewer and water inspection- failing samples in 2008, 



ward consistently cleaner 
water and swimming at the 
city's premier beach which 
recently underwent a $6 to 
$8 million rehabilitation 
with new walkways, sea- 
walls and fountains. 

"There appears to be 
something going on." said 
Koch who invited the agen- 



"My 
getting 
man. 

According to Berman's 
statisfics, the Wollaston 
Beach pollution samples 



to discuss the issue. 

"The spikes were trou- 



McDermott To Host PMC Fundraiser Friday 



Norfolk County Register 
of Probate Patrick McDer- 
mott of Quincy will ride in 
his 18th Pan Massachusetts 
Challenge, a 192-mile bike 



to Provincetown, will all 
proceeds to benefit the Jim- 
my Fund and the Dana Far- 
ber Cancer Insdtute. 

McDermott, who recent- 



fundraiser from Sturbridge Jy had hip revision surgery, 

will host a fundraiser Friday, 



mailed to "Pan Mass Chal- 
lenge" c/o Patrick McDer- 
mott, 55 Dixwell Ave., 
Quincy, MA 02169 or on- 
line at http://wwwpmc.org/ 
egifts/PMOOlS. 



al services said his depart- 
ment tests drainage systems 
and catch basins where dirt, 
garbage or excrement could 
collect and infiltrate drain- 
age water. 

Carlisle, also, said that 
through a special project, 
students at Eastern Naza- 
rene College are collecting 



And now, 2009. the tests 
have been worse. 

Among the 16 partici- 
pants at the discussion were 
Koch . G utro , Lasky , Pastore ; 
Morris. Hardy. Health Com- 
missioner Andrew Scheele; 
Helen Murphy, Director of 
Operafions. Michael Horn- 
brook, Andrea Rex, and 



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Dermott, in riding in mem- 
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who died of cancer in 1989. 



city. 

"The rain has a huge im- 
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did Bruce Berman of Save 
The Harbor/ Save the Bay. 

Neither Berman nor Car- 



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Thursday. July 23. 2009 Tlia Qulnoy Sun Page II 



Long-Time Houghs Neck Activist 



Jack Walsh Appointed 
To MWRA Board 



At the recommendation 
of Mayor Thomas Koch, 
long-time community activ- 
ist Jack Walsh of Houghs 
Neck has been appointed 
as Quincy's representative 
on the Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority Board 
of Directors by Gov. Deval 
Patrick. 

"Jack has been one of 
the strongest voices for the 
Neck - and the city - over 
the years on MWRA issues, 
and 1 know he will contin- 
ue that role on the MWRA 
Board," Koch said. "It's safe 
to say that without Jack and 
others like him, we would 
almost certainly not have 
made the progress we have 
made with the MWRA on 



Related Story 
On Page 13 

so many isues over the last 
generation." 

Walsh, a lifelong Houghs 
Neck resident, played an 
instrumental role in push- 
ing for the clean-up of Nut 
Island as a member of the 
Nut Island Citizens Adviso- 
ry Committee for 29 years. 
The facility, once a poorly 
operating treatment plant, 
has since been refurbished 
and is now home to a pas- 
sive recreational park open 
to the public. 

Walsh succeeds long- 
time MWRA Board Mem- 
ber Jay MacRitchie, whose 
term expired this year. 



"Jay's dedication to the 
MWRA Board and the work 
he put into it over the years 
set a great example, and he 
is very much deserving of 
our gratitude for those years 
of service," Koch said. 

Walsh, who was sworn in 
by Gov. Patrick last week, 
is a retired manufactur- 
ing engineer who has been 
involved with community 
and environmental issues 
in Houghs Neck for many 
years. 

"1 thank Mayor Koch 
for his confidence in me 
and Gov. Patrick for his ap- 
pointment, and I am look- 
ing forward to the challenge 
and the opportunities that 
this new role will present," 
Walsh said. 




JACK WALSH (left) of Houghs Neck after being swom-in as Quincy's representative to the 
MWRA Board of Directors. With him are his wife, Ellen and Gov. Deval Patrick. 

Quincy Access TV Wins 
National Media Awards 



Mayor Holds Talks With Honeywell 



Mayor Thomas Koch 
said, "everything was put 
on the table," during his first 
meeting with high-ranking 
officials from Honeywell 
International amid the city 
and state investigation of the 
2007 energy deal that found 
millions of dollars in inflated 
bills, non-existent oversight 
and a series of other issues. 

In a statement released 
Tuesday, the mayor said of 
the meeting "We talked hon- 
estly, frankly and laid every- 
thing on the table 

"We've been at this in- 
vestigation since we took 
office, and it was the right 
time to sit down and be- 
gin discussions. We remain 
completely committed to 
protecting taxpayers from 
what I consider to be a total 
financial disaster." 

Koch and City Solici- 
tor James Timmins met for 
several hours with Honey- 
well officials, including the 



firm's North American gen- 
eral manager, to discuss the 
investigation. The parties 
agreed to keep details of the 
meeting confidential. 

"There was a good back- 
and-forth, and 1 left the 
meeting feeling that there 
is an earnest desire on both 
sides to resolve this issue," 
said Timmins. 

The administration began 
its probe of the Honeywell 
deal shortly after taking of- 
fice when a bill for $2.8 mil- 
lion appeared in the Mayor's 
Office, Koch said. 

The administration soon 
appointed the job's first 
clerk-of-the- works and ul- 
timately found severe cases 
of over-billing, incomplete 
work, and other problems 
with the $32 million pro- 
gram that was supposed to 
save money for taxpayers, 
Koch said. 

The city investigation 
sparked an investigation 



by the state Inspector Gen- 
eral, which is ongoing to- 
day. Last month. Inspector 
General Gregory Sullivan 
toured several city school 
buildings, where boiler re- 
placements remain a focal 
point of the probe. In those 
schools, boiler replacements 
lacked pre-installation en- 
gineenng and cost between 
four-and-five-times industry 
standards, officials said. 

Among the other issues 
at the heart of the City's 
concerns are: a rcx)f replace- 
ment at the Wollaston branch 
of the Thomas Crane Public 
Library in 2007 that cost the 
city $224,000 when a con- 
tractor estimated it would 
cost $50,000; $77,000 for 
the installation of doors at 
the Quincy Police station, 
and $200,000 for windows 
at the North Quincy Fire 
House that cost $70,000 
more than a contractor esti- 
mated. 



Members of Quincy Ac- 
cess TV received national 
accolades for their produc- 
tion work at the Alliance 
for Community Media's 
National Conference held 
recently in Portland. OR. 

Liz Clancy (QATV). 
Joe Catalano (A.M. Quin- 
cy), Elizabeth Campbell 
(QATV's Executive Direc- 
tor) and Grace Buscher 
(QATV's Board of Direc- 
tors) attended the confer- 
ence. 

QATV swept the first four 
categories at the Hometown 
Video Festival. 

QATV's Mark Crosby's 
"QHD: Spring Rabies Clinic 
with Ruth Jones and Com- 
missioner Drew Scheele" 
took first place in the public 
service announcement cat- 
egory. 

Recreation Director and 
Crosby both received first 
place honors in the Govern- 



mental Activities category 
for their piece "Qumcy Rec- 
reation Department Produc- 
tion Workshop," 

QATV Staff Liz Clancy 
and Jon Calin received first 
place in the Cultural Per- 
spective category for their 
piece "This is Taiv\an"" 
which also picked up an 
honorable mention in the 
documentary category. 

QATV topped off its ac- 
colades with the success of 
"Halloween Safety Tips w ith 



QPD's Lt Dan .Minton.' 
produced by Mark Crosby. 

"Quincy Access Televi- 
sion has also been proud 
of the accomplishment of 
all their members and staff 
for the bright, innovative, 
and informative programs 
produced by and for the citi- 
zens of Quincy." Campbell 
said. "We are thrilled that 
our members and staff are 
receiving the national rec- 
ognition their hard work and 
creativit\ deserves "" 




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Page 12 Tlae Qvdiicy Sun Thursday, July 23, 2009 




FIRE SAFETY 

by Captain Tom Lyons 

Fire Prevention Bureau 
Quincy Fire Department 



Synopsis Of Recent Fires 



Here's a quick synop- 
sis of some fatal fires fea- 
tured in last month's NFPA 
JOURNAL. 

The cause of each and 
every one has been previ- 
ously featured in various ar- 
ticles shared here with you. 
Hilited here again, the con- 
sequences should speak for 
themselves, while the need 
to be aware of potential 
sources of ignition and risky 
behavior should be noted 
again as we learn from these 
examples. 

Two women in Nevada 
died in an early morning 
blaze. The investigation 
determined the cause was 
either due to a pinched elec- 
tric cord igniting bedding, or 
a cigarette igniting bedding. 
To complicate the incident, 
the electrical cord lead to an 
oxygen concentrator. 

A higher concentration 
of oxygen within a room, 
potentially saturating bed- 
ding materials or other com- 
bustibles, will accelerate an 
ignition and intensify the 
resulting fire. 

So there are three issues 
to note here. Beware of any 
electrical extension cord that 
is susceptible to mechanical 
damage. In this incident, the 
cord was severely pinched. 



potentially damaging the 
insulation, resulting in arc- 
ing, which can ignite an ad- 
jacent combustible such as 
bedding. Cigarettes igniting 
sofas and bedding are the 
most common cause of fatal 
residential fires, while add- 
ing medical oxygen use to 
cigarette use, an even dead- 
lier behavioral combination 
results. 

In another fatal fire, a 
57-year-old woman who 
lived alone died when the 
sleeve of her robe ignited 
as she prepared dinner. She 
later died from the result- 
ing burns over 90% of her 
body. 

This is a very common 
scenario and one frequently 
mentioned here. Seniors are 
particularly susceptible to 
this cause of fire when loose 
clothing is ignited. Many fa- 
talities have resulted while 
they are here for us to learn 
from. Remember, loose 
clothing and cooking don't 
mix, and if you experience 
a clothing fire. Stop, Drop 
&R0II. 

In the State of Washing- 
ton, an 80-year-old woman 
died when wind blew over 
an unattended heat lamp. 
She was using it to keep 
several cats warm. 



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Whether it's a candle, 
heat lamp or space heater, 
none of these items should 
be left unattended. Pets left 
alone with a candle, heat 
lamp or space heater is ask- 
ing for trouble. None of 
these three items should be 
left unattended even when 
pets are not present. Unat- 
tended candle use is the 
leading cause of candle fires 
and as noted in a previous 
article, the cause of a double 
fatality in Boston. With all 
the distractions present in 
our daily lives, these items 
if used and walked away 
from, can too easily be for- 
gotten. That oversight can 
have damaging and destruc- 
tive consequences. 

We can learn from each 
of these examples and mod- 
ify any behavior we have in 
common with them. 1 write 
these articles where I be- 
lieve it is our ability to learn 
and adjust our behavior to 
avoid similar results. 

Through our own con- 
scious effort, we can dis- 
associate ourselves from 
these potential and common 
causes of fire, and save oth- 
ers and ourselves the an- 
guish of loss and destruc- 
tion, which they so often 
bring. 

Thank you. 



fAgnitti 

INSURANCE 

HOME • AUTO • BUSINESS 
LIFE • FINANCIAL 




MONTCLAIR WOLLASTON NEIGHBORHOOD Association recently presented a slate of 
the city's shield to Ward 3 Councillor Kevin Coughlin, thanking him for his service as a friend 
of the neighborhood. From left to right are: Association President Mike Covais, Joe McGil- 
licuddy, who designed and painted the slate, Councillor Coughlin and his wife Domenica. 

Quincy Police To Issue 
'Slurpee' Tickets For Good Deeds 



Local kids will be able to 
cool off for a good cause as 
the Operation Chill program 
starts today (Thursday) at 
the 7-Eleven store from 
noon to 2 p.m., at 678 Ad- 
ams St. 

The event includes mem- 
bers of the Quincy Police 
Department distributing 
Slurpee coupons and finger- 
print kits as well as promot- 
ing bicycle safety. Big Bite 
hot dog coupons, soda and 
other fresh foods will be 
provided by 7-Eleven em- 
ployees. 

The Operation Chill 
program, allows law en- 
forcement officers to ticket 



youngsters with Slurpee 
coupons when caught in the 
act of doing good "offenses" 
which might include help- 
ing another, deterring crime 
or participating in a positive 
activity in the community. 

"The partnership between 
the city and 7-Eleven is a 
win-win situation for all," 
said Quincy Police Chief 
Paul Keenan. "The kids not 
only receive praise from an 
officer, they also receive a 
coupon for a free slurpee at 
their local 7-Eleven." 

The national program 
is highly regarded by law 
enforcement agencies and 



kids, alike, according to 
Robert Weston, 7-Eleven's 
loss prevention specialist 
for New England. "Police 
officers have told us they 
love having a positive rea- 
son to approach kids and 
thank them for being good 
citizens," said Weston. 

Nearly 10 million Op- 
eration Chill coupons have 
been distributed to hundreds 
of law enforcement agen- 
cies, nationally, since the 
inception of the program. 
Almost 800,000 Slurpee 
coupons are expected to be 
issued in 2009, mainly dur- 
ing the summer and back-to- 
school months. 




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mission for the fourth year, 
the cruise offers an up close 
view of one of the most 
beautiful areas in Greater 
Boston. Local author John 
Galluzzo, an authority on 
the Boston Islands, will be 
in attendance and comment 
on the history of the Islands. 
All proceeds go towards the 
Quincy Beaches and Coast- 
al Commission for the ben- 
efit of programs for Quincy 
residents. 

Departing from the Har- 
bor Express Terminal/Fore 
River Basin at 7:00 p.m., 
boarding begins at 6:30 
p.m., rain or shine. 

The event is also spon- 
sored by Mayor Thomas 



Koch, Quincy Beaches and 
Coastal Commission Chair- 
man Leo Kelly, and Harbor 
Express President Mike 
McGurl. 

Light refreshments, des- 
sert and coffee will be pro- 
vided and there is a cash bar. 
Advance ticket prices are 
$20 for adults, children 6- 1 5 
and seniors $17. Children 
under the age of 5 are free. 
Tickets at the gate are $25 . 

To reserve tickets, call 
Margaret (617-773-1534) 
or Chickie (617-479-2142). 
Checks should be made pay- 
able to Chickie Abdallah, 
QBCC Treasurer, 48 Silver 
Street, Quincy, MA, 02169. 

For more information, 
call (617) 773-1534. 



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Thursday, July 23, 2009 Tlie Quinc^ Siu& Page 13 



Vve Enjoyed It But It's Time To Move On ' 

MacRitchie Leaves MWRA Board With Legacy Of Progress 



By TOM HENSHAW 

The man who was in 
on the original action 
that eventually became 
the Massachusetts Water 
Resources Administration 
has cut his last connec- 
tion with the MWRA after 
20 years on the Board of 
Directors. 

Joseph "Jay" MacRitchie 
attended his last board meet- 
ing June 24, then turned the 
|ob over to John "Jack" 
Walsh, the Houghs Neck en- 
vironincntalist, newly rec- 
urninended for appointment 
h\ Mavor f homas f*. Koch. 

MacRitchic's puhhc scr 
Mcc dates back almost .-^0 
Vviii^ and includ 
'c-nT post <l^ exec 

o( the Oi-'inc) Mousiiiy 
AufhontN sinte 2(M)5 and an 
earlier stint as cit\ stilicitor. 



hi- cur- 
V unvc- 



IK 



i\cs 



m Squantum 



He had just been appoint- 
ed assistant cit} solicitor ot 
Qumc) in DecerntxT. I9S2 
when he personally car- 
tied the papers to Norfolk 
Superior Court that began 
the city's uiiidmark ^uit that 
tina!!} g'^ Uean up work on 
Boston Harbor underwa). 

The suit led tt) the ere 
ation of the MWRA and one 
of history's great environ- 
mental projects --• the %1 
billion cleanup of the harbor 
and Qi^i'iic) Bay and the up- 
grade of the water and sewer 
systems in Greater Boston 

His successor, Walsh, is 
an engineer who retired three 
years ago as a manufactur- 
ing engineer from Instron 
Corporation in Norwood, 
manufacturers of materials 
testing instruments. 

A graduate of 

Northeastern and Wentworth 
Institute, Walsh has been 
chair of the Nut Island 
Citizens Committee since 
1980 and was the commu- 
nity representative on the 
Boston Harbor Citizens 
Advisory Committee from 
1981-85. 

MacRitchie himself was 
named to the 1 1 -member 
Board of Directors of the 
MWRA in 1989 by Mayor 
Frank McCauley and re- 
tained in that post for the 
next 20 years at the pleasure 
of Mayors James Sheets, 
William Phelan and Koch. 

Over the telephone. 




.|AVMacRIT( HIK 

MacRilehie ^()unded like a 
ni'in \ehi> tlidn't really want 
!o go. 

■■ rile inasor gels iu 
choose \s\m iie waiUs lo i.\ 
point."" he <u<\. "V xn glad he 
let nie serve out m\ lull term. 
Ahich expired m .laiiuary 
lor the lirst time m more 
than 20 vears. 1 have noth- 
ing to ilo with the MWRA. 

■■Txe eiijo\ed it but it is 
time to ni('\e on. It's tune 
for somebody else. Jack 
Walsh has been invtlwd 
in the MWRA as lung as I 
have, he's been a watchdoti 
that long " 

During .MaeKitchie's 
tenure, the modernization ol 
the MW RAs drmking water 
system neared completion 
with a state-of-the-art ozone 
treatment plant, a 17-inile 
aqueduct and covered stor- 
age tanks throughout the 
system. 

One of the great local ac- 
complishments of his time 
on the Board was the trans- 
formation of the once dirty, 
smelly sewer treatment plant 
on Nut Island into an odor- 
less headworks surrounded 
by an 11 -acre park. 

Other key Board deci- 
sions during MacRitchie's 
time included replacement 
of the dilapidated waste- 



water pumping stations in 
Merrymount and Squantum 
and the deep rock tun- 
nel from the Fore River 
Shipyard to Nut Island. 

The latest project on the 
drawing board is a mas- 
sive 10-year, $115 million 
series of upgrades to the 
southern water system that 
supplies Quincy, including 
two 10 million-gallon stor- 
age tanks in the Blue Hill 
Reservation. 

At MaeRitchie"s insis- 
tence, the tank project m- 
cludes pubik. access smi!. 
Iiails. an upland inead"v. 
and a lishmg pond. 

As a member «>' th,- 
Boi.rd. MacRiictii- 
^^TN'ed a^ >eereia''\ 

in 1^! the \v'a>leuatei md 
Uver^igilt T'oriirriittee »- 
well as the t-^oard's repn- 
.tentative oii 'ho .MWR.A 
I-mplovee's Reiireinen! 

Hoard 

\\c has also been vice 
president since 1992 ot the 
MWRA ouned Fne R .:•• 
Ra:!rl)ad Corpi .ration, c-i' 
o; die i'li-iest shoi! luie :a.|i - 
roiids in the state 

The .MWRA's BnarJ 
ol !J>i rectors is made up o\ 
three representatives troin 
the .Advisory Board, three 
appointees b> the mayor of 
Boston, three appointees h> 
the governor, one appointee 
by the town of VN'inthrop and 
one appointee by the gover- 
nor recommended by the 
mayor of Quincy. 

In addition to Walsh, 
members of the Board and 
the dates of their appoint- 
ments now include: 

Chair Ian Bowles, 
secretary of Energy and 
Environmental Affairs 

(2006); 

Vice Chair John J. 
Carroll, town manager of 
Norwood (1985); 

Joel A, Barrera, deputy 



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Page 14 Tlie Qi&incy Svux Thursday, July 23, 2009 



A Job Well Done 

On Monday, July 6 at approximately 1:30 p.m.. Offi- 
cer John Leuchte was called to the Quincy Police Station 
Lobby to interview a 47-year- 
old female victim about her 
missing car and a prescrip- 
tion. She said that the incident 
all started back on June 24'^ 
when she was taken by ambu- 
lance to Quincy Medical Cen- 
ter becau.se she was having 
suicidal thoughts. 

She stated that she was 
admitted to Pembroke Hos- 
pital and it was there that she 
learned that a friend's daughter 
visited her at the Quincy Med- 
ical Center June 24"^, posing 

as her niece, where she took custody of her belonging, her 
clothes, wallet, and car keys. She stated the "niece" and 
her mother (the friend) then went to Father Bill's (shel- 
ter) and took her car without her permission. The victim 
also learned that on June 25'\ her "friend" filled her pre- 
scription for Morphine at the Rite Aid, using the victim's 
license for identification. The victim learned all this and 
more from talking to the "niece" on the phone. 

The "niece" said that she also crashed the victim's car 
and it was parked at the "niece's" house. She also said 
that her boyfriend took the Morphine and sold it for $900. 
The victim said that she wanted to report her car sto- 
len because she did not know were it was and the "niece" 
refused to return it. 

Officer Leuchte attempted to gather more information 
about the three suspects, but the victim was unable to pro- 
vide last names. The officer then spoke with the Rite Aid 
pharmacist, who confirmed the victim's prescripfion was 
filled on June 25'\ with her license used for idennfication 
and the transaction was recorded on the store camera sys- 
tem. The vicfim filed a stolen motor vehicle form and this 
was entered into the state system. 

The officer told the victim she needed to get the last 
names of the suspects, who she knew through Father 
Bill's and she said that she would. The officer also called 
the "niece" and told her to call and return the car, but she 
did not call back. 

At 2:30 p.m.. Officer Leuchte drove over to Father 
Bill's to see if the vehicle was there. As he drove up the 
street, he observed the victim standing outside her car, as 
two females and a male exited the vehicle. The officer ap- 
proached them and called out to communications that he 
was out with the Stolen Vehicle and several parties. Offi- 
cers' William Lanergan and Tom Gaeta arrived moments 
later and the suspects were seated on the curb. 

The victim said that this was her car. The young fe- 
male turned out to be the "niece", while the older woman 
was the "friend" and the male was the suspect who sold 
the Morphine. 

As warrants and criminal record checks were being 
conducted. Officer Leuchte inquired how they ended up 
with the victim's car. The "niece" said that she and her 
mother visited the vicfim at the hospital and she told them 
to take her vehicle while she was in the hospital. The 
"niece" stated the victim gave her the keys along with her 
wallet and clothes to hold. Her friend added that the vic- 
tim gave her a prescription for Morphine and told her to 
sell it for her while she was in the hospital. 

She stated that she went to Rite Aid and filled the pre- 
scription using the victim's license and her own to pick it 
up. She then said that the male suspect sold the Mor- 
phine. The male suspect denied any knowledge of the 
Morphine. Officer Gaeta learned that there were warrants 
on the "niece" and the male suspect, but not the "friend." 
Officer Leuchte then placed all three suspects under 
arrest. The "niece," a 25 year-old Quincy resident, was 
charged with receiving a stolen motor vehicle and two 
warrants. The victim's "friend," a 54 year-old Quincy 
resident, was charged with receiving a stolen motor ve- 
hicle and uttering. The male suspect, a 31 year-old Nor- 
wood resident, was charged with receiving a stolen motor 
vehicle and two warrants." 
Nice Work! 



QUINCY POLICE HOT SPOTS 






If you have information on the above crimes, drug activity 
ex- any crime,please call tht QuiiKr^ Police Detective Bureau 
at 617-745-5764 or log onto the following website: http:// 
tinyuri .<x)ni/ytf6td . 

If you wish to report suspicious drug activity, call the 
Drug HoC-Une at 617-328-4527. You will not be required 
to identify yiHirsclf , but it could help. If you wish to make an 
^Tpointment to view the Re^stetnA Sex Offenders book, call 
Detective OaOy Wabh at 617-745-5751 

If ymi wish to contact the CrinK Preventicm Officer for 
tips orc<Hninents, my direct line is 617-745-5719. My e-mail 
2^iiess is dmintcH)@ci.quiiu^.ni».us 
-Lt. Dan MirOon 



QUINCY POLICE STATISTICS; .lULY 10 - JULY 16 

Total Calls for Service : 1^98 

Total Arrests : 41 

Total Stolen Motor Vehic les: 4 

THURSDAY. lULY 9 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 12:29 a jn., 108 Bromfield St. 

Just happened. Caller alleges cab driver assaulted him and his 

girlfriend and then took off with two handbags inside cab. Was 

picked up in Boston but assault happened here. Stems from some 

type of fare dispute. 

LARCENY, 7:39 ajn., 48 Baystate Rd UPS package Male 
caller reports his UPS package was open and item inside taken. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 10:28 a jn., Fours Boston, 15 
Cottage Ave. Past incident. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 10:42ajii.,Neponset 
Landing, 2 Hancock St. Television stolen from media room. In- 
cident was caught on surveillance video. $2,000 flat screen stolen 
from within. "Media room" is common area. Occurred around I 
a.m. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 11:15 a jn., 53 Woodbine 
St. Past. 1995 Saturn SC2, color red. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:33 a.m.. Fowler Street and 
Washington Street. Graftiti. Mailbox. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:35 a.ni., Baxter Street and 
Union Street. Graffiti. Mailbox. 

VANDALlSMyTROPERTY, 1 1 :37 a jn., Edwards Street and 
Union Street. Graffiti. Mailbox. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:37 ajn., Phipps Street and 
Water Street. Graffiti. Mailbox. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 2:14 pjn.. Dependable Clean- 
ers, 320 Quincy Ave. Graffiti . Building just painted over from past 
incident. Youths have written graffiti again. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 6: 18 p.m., 133 Beale 
St. Dwelling. Nintento Wii, Sony PlayStation, Nikon camera, and 
a X42 Thinkpad are known missing. Witness saw a suspicious 
white male, mid 20"s, skinny, long black hair, missing front tooth, 
dark tank, numerous tattoos on legs and arms, wearing shorts and 
a t-shirt around 14:25 p.m. on front porch of 129 Beale St. 

ARMED ROBBERY, 10:41 p.m., 1 1 Newbury St With gun 
Driver held up by a white male, cap and glasses, white male,40's, 
6-foot, sweat pants, white t-shirt, told victim to walk away and turn 
around. Gun shown. Sweat pants were gray. Happened in parking 
lot. Gun shown was a .38-caliber Snubnose. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 11:34 pjn.. Houghs Neck Pack- 
age Store, 1183 Sea St. Window. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 11:51 p.m.. Varsity Club, 33 
Independence Ave. Arrest for ABPO and resisting. 

FRIDAY. .lULY 10 
LARCENY, 5:19 a.m., 198 Holbrook Rd Fare evasion. 
Subject went into apartment house prior to arrival. Cab driver 
will take loss. 

LARCENY, 8:26 ajn., 721 Washington St. Of money. Caller 
states female took $986 from the caller. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:08 ajn., 25 Morton St Tires 
slashed. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:17 a.m., Houghs Neck 
Package Store, 1183 Sea St. Front door - glass shattered after 
closing. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 11:43 ajn., South Shore Recov- 
ery Home, 10 Dysart St. In progress. Caller states a male who is 
out front spit on her; she states the male is drunk, wearing a back 
pack, white polo shirt. 774 off with possible suspect. Male suspect 
placed under arrest for disorderly conduct. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:25 pan., St. Ann's l\innel, 55 
St. Ann Rd. Graffiti. Profane statement spraypainted on one of the 
inside walls of the tunnel. 

LARCENY, 7:25 pjn., Prime Gas, 700 Hancock St. Gas. 
Party paid the money back. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 7:55 pjn., Harriet Ave. Orange 
bike. This was an unarmed robbery which occurred on Harriet 
Ave. Complaint submitted. 

LARCENY, 8:30 p.m., 75 Taffrail Rd. Table taken from 
lawn. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 10:54 pjn.. 
Granite City Electric, 19 Quincy Ave . Arrest made. Two arrested. 
Both charged with breaking and entering nighttime; #1 additionally 
charged with carrying d/w - brass knuckles and poss. Class A. 
SATIRnAVnilVll 
VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:07 ajn., Quincy Jade Res- 
taurant, 22 Cottage Ave. Phone lines cut. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:09 ajn., 888 East Squantum 
St. To fence. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 11:22 ajn., Dave's Auto 
Service, 636 Hancock St. Past. Jeep Cherokee with plates attached 
from another car. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 12:33 p.m., 16 Quarry St 
Spray paint. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 3:09 pjn., 126 Clay 
St. Dwelling. Two credit cards stolen; suspect confronted and 
admitted to theft. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PROGRESS, 11:59 pjn., 
71B Station St. In progress. Broken door. Thinks someone is in 
the house. 

SUNDAY, IlJf.V 12 
ASSAULT AND BATTERY, l:03ajn., 118 Holmes St Males 
Male party was punched in the face and it's now bleeding. Other 
half fled upon arrival . 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 8 a.m., 80 
Whitwell St. Dwelling. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 8:09 ajn., 100 
Taffrail Rd. Past. Damage to door. 

LARCENY, 12:52 pjn., 44 Quarterdeck Rd. Caller states a 
military bullet proof vest was taken. 

LARCENY, 2:05 pjn., Webster's Eatery, 13 Scammell St 
Credit cards. Card was last used here and now transactions are 
coming up in the surroundmg area. 



MONDAY. JULY 13 
BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 6:45 ajn., 195 Cope- 
land St. Dwelling. Wallet and iPod stolen. Credit card used at 75 
Copeland St. Incident occurred around 2 a.m. when victim heard 
suspicious noises in apartment. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 6:49 a.m.. South 
Century Auto Collision, 33 Newport Ave. Business. Caller 
indicates garage was broken into sometime over night. Nothing 
appears missing. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 7:14 a.m., 162 Copeland St 
Sunroof was smashed overnight. No entry gained. 

LARCENY, 11:21 ajn.. Stop and Shop Supermarket, 495 
Southern Artery. Fled. White male, blue plaid shorts, gray t-shirt, 
covered in tattoos. Tried to pass a phony check for $252. Fled to- 
wards rear of Brackett St. Dog enroute. Passed bad check, uttering. 
Dog located suspect in marshland. Arrest for three counts forgery, 
two counts uttering, larceny by check less, attempted larceny by 
check over and RSP less. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 1:57 p.m., 7 Langley Cir 
Past. 2008 Volkswagen Toureg, color brown. Form shows keys in 
vehicle. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 3:36 pjn.. Stop and Shop Su- 
permarket, 495 Southern Artery. Most likely cart damage. 
VANDALISM/PROPERTY,'4:14 p.m., 24 Wall St Past 
LARCENY, 5:06 p.m., IHOP, 119 Parkingway Possible 
larceny. White male left without paying. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 7:01 p.m., Rhoda Street Off 
duty officer reports male party bleeding from face. Past assault. 
One to QMC. 

TUESDAY. JULY 14 
VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 1:11 ajn., 49 Nelson St Broken 
window. Found window broken on parked car. 

LARCENY, 10:31 ajn., Quincy Historical Society, 8 Ad- 
ams St. Copper. 15-foot section of copper down-spout taken 
overnight. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 4:12 p.m., Dunkin' Donuts, 
388 East Squantum St. Graffiti. Youths are on scene at back of 
building now. No youths and no graffiti. 

LARCENY, 5:35 p.m., 185 Samoset St. Past. Cell phone that 
was delivered to house was taken and signed b\ someone else. 

LARCENY,6:09 pjn.. Presidential Pub, 29 Temple St. Stolen 
check. He is holding check that he cashed for patron at above. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 6:58 p.m., US Gas Two, 664 
Washington St. Of money. Just left in a white Mercury. Suspect 
fled northbound on Washington Street operating a white Mercury, 
four-d(x"»r motor vehicle. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/ATTEMPT, 7: 11 pjn., 195 
Copeland St. Past. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 7:53 pjn., 559 Wil- 
lard St. Dwelling. Two computers taken. 

WEDNESDAY JULY 15 
BREAKING AND ENTERlNG/ArfEMPT, 12:06 ajn.. Two 
Hundred Food Mart, 200 Sea St. Business. Tall male wearing a 
dark colored hoody attempting to gain entrance through the front 
door Cargo shorts, dark hooded sweatshirt, multiple 91 1 calls. One 
in custody. Arrest for B&E nighttime and malicious damage. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:26 ajn., 47 Sea Ave Motor 
vehicle damage. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:50 ajn., Falls Condomini- 
ums, 200 Falls Blvd. Tmck keyed in visitor's parking lot. Both 
driver's and passenger's side keyed. 

LARCENY, 11:06 ajn., Wal-Mart, 301 Falls Blvd Credit 
card. Card also used at Wal green's. 

ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 7:39 pjn., CVS Pharmacy, 626 
Southern Artery. Past. The assault was a minor tap. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10: 12 pjn., Quincy Shore Drive 
and Rice Road. A bench. 

THlIRSnAV IllfVli; 
ASSAULT AND BATTERY, 1:21 ajn., Hayden Street and 
West Street. Large fight in the street, about seven or eight. Am- 
bulance requested at 18 West Street for head injury and possibly 
broken nose. Arrest for A&B; victim to QMC. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 6 a.m., Maxcare 
Cleaners, 238 Billings Rd. Business. Cash register missing. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 8:39 ajn., Torre Dei Passeri 
Social Club, 252 Washington St. Chairs damaged. Chairs were 
taken from premises and broken up. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 9:09 ajn., 500 Willard St Car 
window broken overnight by a BB gun or some type of round. 
Minor damage to window. 

VANDALISM/PROPERTY, 10:32 a.m., 66 Gould St Tire 
slashed. Blood trail leading away from the vehicle. 

BREAKING AND ENTERING/PAST, 11:46 ajn., CJ Bait 
Tackle, 22 Billings Rd. Business. Premises entered last night; 
fishing tackle and weights stolen, about $6,000 loss. 

LARCENY/MOTOR VEHICLE, 2:48 p.m., 14 Bishop Rd. 
Gray Honda Accord was just involved in an incident in Weymouth. 
Two parties bailed and left vehicle with keys in it. Owner states car 
was stolen from in front of house. Left keys in vehicle. 

□ 
STOLEN MOTOR VEHICLES: Woodbine Street, 600 
block of Hancock Street, Langley Circle, Bishop Road. 

'J 
CAR BREAKS: 200 block Kendrick Avenue, Pilgrim 
Road, 700 block of Hancock Street, 100 block of Billings Road, 
Conant Road, Sewall Street, Myrtle Street, Sharon Road, Saga- 
more Street, Janet Road, Clay Street, 400 block of Belmont 
Street, 100 Block of Elmwood Avenue, Hillside Avenue, Win- 
throp Avenue, Park Street, 300 block of Highland Avenue, 200 
block of Pine Street, Lincoln Avenue, Harriet Avenue, Smith 
Street, Montclair Avenue 

□ 
BREAKS AND ATTEMPTED BREAKS: 2 Hancock 
Street, Taffrail Road, Whitwell Street, 100 block of Copeland 
Street, 500 block of Willard Street, 200 block of Billings Road, 
Garfield Street 



T hursday, July 23, 2009 Tlae Quincy Sun Page 15 



* * * On The Campaign Trail - City Election 2009 * * * 

Michael Covais Announces 
Candidacy For School Committee 



With the campaign season underway for this fall's city election. The Quincy Sun 
will publish, from time to time and when space is available, press releases submit- 
ted from candidates and their committees. 

The Sun wants its readers to know the releases are not written by Quincy Sun 
staff. The Sun retains the right to edit releases for space purposes. 

Phelan: 'Despite Largest Tax Increase In 

City History, Quincy's Budget Less 

Transparent Than Other Mass Cities' 



Not only are Quincy tax- 
payers paying a lot more 
in increased taxes than 
residents of other cities and 
states, they are getting a 
lot less information about 
where that money goes, 
mayoral candidate William 
Phelan said in a statement 
released July 17. 

Phelan pointed out that 
Mayor Tom Koch, in his 
2007 campaign, promised a 
"more open, responsive and 
efficient" government. "De- 
spite that promise, and de- 
spite the largest tax increase 
in city history, the budget 
Mayor Koch submitted for 
the FY 10 fiscal year begin- 



ning July 1 was only 83 pag- 
es long," Phelan said. 

"Other cities in Massa- 
chusetts provide their citi- 
zens a great deal more in- 
formation about how their 
taxes are being spent," Phel- 
an said. 

"For example, the City of 
Springfield had a budget for 
this year that was 544 pages 
long, the City of New Bed- 
ford had a budget that was 
205 pages long, and the City 
of Cambridge produced a 
budget with 616 pages of in- 
formation," Phelan said. 

"Taxes went way up, and 
the transparency of spend- 
ing went way down," said 



the former mayor, who is 
challenging Koch in this 
fall's city election. 

"It's bad enough that 
taxpayers are getting hit by 
the biggest tax increase of 
any city in the state, but the 
Mayor isn't even telling us 
where our money is going. 
When 1 was Mayor," Phelan 
continued, "we always sub- 
mitted detailed budgets that 
provided hundreds of pages 
of information about specif-* 
ic programs. 

"Hard-pressed Quincy 
taxpayers have every right 
to wonder where their tax 
dollars are going, and why 
this administration isn't 
more open," Phelan added. 



Michael A Covais recent- 
ly launched his candidacy for 
a seat on the Quincy School 
Committee at a recent cam- 
paign kick-off gathering. 

"It is my belief that noth- 
ing is more important in our 
free society than the educa- 
tion of the next generation of 
Americans," Covias said in 
announcing his campaign. 

"Public education is the 
key to maintaining the great 
quality of life that we en- 
joy here in Quincy," Covais 
continued. "Without rock 
solid schools, young fami- 
lies will move out of Quincy 
and change the character of 
our great city. 

"I am a product of public 
schools, and my wife Lisa 
and I have a son, Dio, who 
is about to enter the 12"" 
grade at North Quincy High 
School. 1 know how impor- 
tant public education is, and 
1 am firmly committed to it. 
1 believe that education is 




MICHAEL COVALS 

more than learning how to 
take a standardized test." 

Covais, an attorney with 
an office in .Marina Bay. 
has been active in the com- 
munity for many years. He 
has served in the follow- 
ing capacities: president 
of the Board of Directors. 
Greater Quincy Child Care 
Center, community busi- 
ness representative on the 
School Advisory Council 
at the Bernazzani Elemen- 
tary School, co-chair of the 



School Advisory Council at 
the Montclair School, coach 
of youth basketball at St. 
Mary's Church, director of 
Quincy Youth Basketball 

Covais is currently active 
in the following business 
and communit) organiza- 
tions; Quincy 2(KK), BNI In- 
ternational. President Derby 
Street Chapter; Montclair 
UbIlaston .Neighborhood 
AsscKiation. past Presi- 
dent and secretary . Quincy 
Democratic Cil\ Commit- 
tee. Ward 3 chairperson, 
and a sponsor of youth base- 
ball. Softball and basketball 
teams 

Covais is a graduate of 
Harvard Lniversity and Suf- 
folk University Law School. 
He IS a member of the Bar 
in Massachusetts and New 
York. 

For more information 
about his candidacy, contact 
the campaign's website at 
www.mikecovais.com. 



Palmucci Fundraiser July 29 



The Committee to Elect public to an Ice Cream So- 
Brian Palmucci a. Ward 4 cial fundraiser Wednesday, 
city councillor invites the July 29 at the Quincy Sons 

Correction 



"This is just a first step, 
some of the things that could 
happen," Mayor Thomas 
Koch said on July 8, refer- 
ring to a preliminary devel- 
opment plan for Wollaston 
Center. Koch also called the 
proposal "almost a village 



type plan." 

The comments were in- 
correctly attributed to an- 
other speaker in a report on 
the unveiling of the plan. 
The comments appeared 
in a story published in The 
Quincy Sun July 16. 



of Italy Social Center, 120 
Quarry St. 

The event will be held 
from 6 to 8 p.m. Suggested 
donation is $25. 

For more information, 
contact Brian Palmucci at 
617-233-3802 or visit www. 
BrianPalmucci.com. 



Koch Community Cookout Aug. 6 



Mayor Thomas Koch will 
host his third annual Com- 
munity Cookout Thursday, 
Aug. 6 at 6 p.m. at Pageant 
Field in Merrymount Park. 

The event is free and 
open to every resident. 

"It will be a good time, 
with plenty of good people 



and good food." Koch said. 
"I invite everyone to drop 
by for a burger or a hot dog. 
enjoy the scenery of one of 
our most beautiful parks, 
and have a relaxing evening 
with the whole family." 

There will be activities 
and games for kids, and 



the mavor said residents 
are "more than welcome to 
bring their questions and 
concerns, as well as their 
appetite, as it will be a great 
chance to chat informally." 

For more information, 
visit www.mayortom- 

koch.com or call 617-773- 
KOCH 



JO//V US! 



Hundreds of People 
Dozens of Restaurants 

ONE REASON: 

"bodv should be homeles. 



food Fest 
& Auction 

«o benefit Father BWs Place 

^"'y 28, 2009 




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Fly roundtrip and stay 7 days/6 nights at 
the Frenchman's Reef and Morning Star 
Marriott Beach Resort. $20 each or 3 for $50 

Purchase your ticket or raffle tickets 
today at www.fatherbillsmainspring.org 
or call 617-376-2255 x231. 



Are you stCK and tired 

OF FCKUNO «CK AND TIRED .» 



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DAILEY TAX & IMSURAMCE, IMC. 

All your insurance needs! 
HOME • AUTO • BUSINESS • LIFE 

We are able to tailor make insurance programs to provide 

maximum protection in all lines at affordable rates. 

You'll love our personal service. 

Business & Personal T^x Service 

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526 Sea Street, Quincy 

Phone 617-472-8100 Fax 617-472-8131 



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FeSt 

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To Advertise in this section 
call 617-471-3100 



Quincy 's Oh?i Weekly Newspaper Since 1968 

You Will Enjoy Consistent Identification 
• Quality Readership • 



Page 16 Tlie Qi&incy Sun Thunday, J ul> 23,2009 



Highlights From The Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival 




LEO KEKA of Alba's Restaurant 
with his daughter Madison at the 



GIVING OUT gold-colored cardboard hats during the 
Sidewalk Festival are "Mrs. Quincy Gold" Gina Hanley 



39th annual Quincy Center Side- PART TIME Lover's Band performs in front of Cela's Restaurant in Quincy Center during (left) and "Miss Quincy Gold" Ashley Blumberg (right) 



walk Festival. 



the 39th annual Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival. 



Maralin Manning Photos outside Stephen Leigh Jewelers in Quincy Center. 




CUTTING THE RIBBON marking the official opening of the 39th annual Quincy Center Sid- 
walk Festival are (from left) Dean Rizzo, executive director, Quincy 2000; Maralin Manning, 
Quincy Business Association; Ken Anderson, Bank of Canton and QBA vice president; Jeffrey 
Bertman. Rogers Jewelry and QBA president; Mayor Thomas Koch, Ward 5 Councillor Doug 
Gutro and Caryn Smith, Cary n's Corner and QBA director. 



M^.M.M 




SOL 1 li hHORE BAY Band was a big hit at the 39th annual Quincy Center Sidewalk FestivaL 

Maralin Manning Photos 




HAVING SOME FAMILY fun at the 39th annual Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival are these 
Quincy residents: from left to right Kerrin Corriera and her children Kallie and Jonathan; 
Bobby Krohan, Kim Hoye and Marianne Krohan. 



MAYOR TOM KOCH (second from left) greets representatives of the Bank of Canton during 
the Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival. From left: John Farmer, Judy Farmer with granddaugh- 
ter Katie Noonan and Ken Anderson. 




TOM FORD (right) of Woods Auto School presents the Classic Car Trophy to winner Jim Wil- 
lard. Behind the wheel of his 1956 Chevy Convertible is Ashley Peterson. The trophy was Wil- 
lard's fifth regional award for this car. 



ENJOYING THE QUINCY Center Sidewalk Festival are Jerry Mulvey (left) of the Granite 
Rail and former mayor and mayoral candidate William Phelan. 



•mm 



Tbe QiUzxcy Sun I hursda> , J uly 23, 2009 Page 1 7 




A Combined Effort Produces Very Special Results 

Spring Fashion Event 
Benefits Maria Droste Agency 



CHRISTINE SULLIVAN 



When fashion is the focus of 
an event, the occasion is bound to 
be a "stylish affair." Recently just 
such a special evening \vas held 
with just such a fashi(.)nable tone: 
to benefit the Good Shepherd's 
Maria Droste Counseling Agency 
in Quincy. This event w as held at 
Lantana's in Randolph with an 
evening with cocktails, dinner, 
music, a silent auction and a great 
deal of chic style on the program. 
Honorary Chairs for this year's 
event were Massachusetts State 
Treasurer Timothy Cahill and his 
wife Tina Cahill. The chairman 
of the evening's event v\as State 
Representative Martin Walsh of 
South Boston. 

This year, for the fourth time, 
this annual gala occasion was 
dedicated and named in honor 
of Darlene Sheehan. For the past 
three years this has been a su- 
per collaboration, combining the 
Maria Droste Fundraising Com- 
mittee and "Friends of Darlene 



Sheehan" in a partnership that has 
proven to he a winning team. 

Iriends ot Darlene's. as well 
as several local trendsetters, both 
male and temale. took to the 
runway to model iwn fantastic 
collections of sprmg ensembles. 
Helpmg the ladies to make sprmg 
wardrobe choices was an excit- 
ing assortment of ensembles trom 
Caryn's Corner of Quincv. .Addi 
tionally, to present Spring 2009 
from a male point of view, was 
shown a collection of clothing tor 
men of all sizes and all ages from 
a Quinc) haberdashers of long- 
standing repute, Hajjar's. As al- 
ways the male model participants 
once again stole the show ! 

This very caring agencv is 
staffed and operated by the Sis- 
ters of the Good Shepherd and 
several clinicallv trained profes- 
sionals who serve as volunteers. 
Since opening m Quincv Center 
in 1992. as a communitv counsel- 
ing service, the agenc> has pro- 



vided critical support to individu 
als. couples, and taniil) groups 
in need of compassionate under 
standing. Ihe staff and volunteer 
clinicians have provided hun- 
dreds of counseling hours serving 
clients as young as .'S and as senior 
as "^3 . on a sliding fee scale that is 
structured according to the client's 
abilitv to pas. The principles that 
direct this agencv are in perfec! 
tandem with the mission Darlene 
Sheehan v\orked so hard to foster 
during her own personal illness 
right up until her untimelv death 
I hat IS why Darlene's friends, in 
celebrating her life, have chosen 
this agencv to receive benefits of 
their philanthropic efforts. 



Photos 

courtesy of 

Maralin Manning 







M 



HATIAR'S (iRANDFATHER and (irandscn Team. VlichatI and (irandfa- 
SISTER LORRAINE BERNIER, Executive Administrator Maria Droste therToufie. 

Agency. 



DON UVANITTE 




MARY ELLEN BRETT 



STEVE TOBIN 



TINA TIGGLE 



MARALIN MANNINC; 



DAVID DENNIS 



Page 18 Tlie Quincy Sxlmm. Thursday, July 23, 2009 



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5 Tips To Keep Your Home Safe In An Emergency 



(ARA) - Over the years, 
Americans have endured 
many different types of 
tragedies and crises -- from 
Hurricane Katrina and Sept. 
1 1 to countless tornadoes, 
earthquakes and other natu- 
ral disasters. During these 
hardships, we have learned 
to expect the unexpected and 
to be ready for anything. 



With this in mind, the 
U.S. Department of Home- 
land Security has declared 
September National Pre- 
paredness Month in an 
effort to educate people 
about natural and national 
disaster preparedness and 
to motivate families to plan 
ahead. In support of this 
year's "Ready Campaign," 



THIS 
ISA 



WTyvIMER 

By Samantha Mazzotta 




Stripping Old 

Finish From 

Hardwood Floor 



Q:L 



Vd like to refin- 
ish the hardwood 
floor lii our upstairs com- 
mon area. Vm pretty sure 
it was installed when the 
house was built. The floor 
has some sort of shiny fin- 
ish (or it used to be shiny), 
though Vm not sure what it 
is. Will this matter when I 
strip this finish off? Do you 
have any tips to speed the 
process? - Mel in KnoxviUe, 
Tenn. 

A^ Knowing what type 
• of finish is on the 
floor will help you choose the 
right type of stripper, if you 
intend to use a chemical strip- 
per rather than sand the finish 
off. 

Head up to the area with a 
few cotton swabs, some dena- 
tured alcohol and a bit of lac- 
quer thinner. To test the finish, 
rub a cotton bail soaked with 
the alcohol on a small area. If 
the finish starts to come off, 
then it's probably shellac. If it 
doesn't come off, soak a dif- 
ferent cotton ball with lacquer 
thinner and rub a different 
area. If the finish comes off 
here, you're dealing with a 
lacquer finish. If neither sol- 
vent brings up the finish, it's 
probably polyurethane var- 
nish. 

This is important because 
is when you go to the home- 
improvement store to buy a 



chemical stripper, you're go- 
ing to need to choose the one 
that works best with the finish 
on your floor. You'll also need 
a rinsing solvent that's com- 
patible with the type of strip- 
per you choose, to neutralize 
the chemical afterward. 

To work with chemical 
stripper, make sure the area 
is well -ventilated and wear a 
respirator mask, gloves and 
goggles. Apply the stripper 
with a paintbmsh, covering 
only a small area at a time. 
Let the stripper work for the 
amount of time recommended 
on the bottle, then use a nylon 
scraper to scrape away the old 
finish. Scrape in line with the 
wood grain. 

Once the entire floor is 
stripped, dip an abrasive pad 
into the rinsing solvent and 
scrub the floor. Don't use wa- 
ter to rinse the floor. Remove 
residual sludge, particularly 
between the floorboards (use 
a small putty knife for this). 

HOME TIP: To remove 
dark stains from hardwood, 
try bleaching the area with 
a solution of oxalic acid and 
water. Follow up with white 
vinegar, then rinse with water. 
Use wood restorer to match 
the area to the rest of the 
floor. 

Send questions or home- 
repair tips to homegurulOOO® 
hotmail.com, or write This Is 
a Hammer, do King Features 
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475. 
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 

© 2009 King FeaUires Synd., Inc. 



CityWew iMl Estate 




Patrick J. Mulkern 

Working with Buyers and Sellers. 
Call me for a FREE opinion of Value ! 

0£5cc 617-773-5588 • Cell 617-590-9168 
www.cityvicwrcalcstatc.com 



First Alert and The Lehigh 
Group, makers of home 
safety and security prod- 
ucts, offer some simple tips 
for preparing your home and 
family to face unexpected 
emergencies. 

"You never know when 
disastei may strike, so hav- 
ing a safety plan in place is 
the best way to prepare your 
family to face crises with 
confidence," says Deborah 
Hanson, director of external 
affairs for First Alert and 
The Lehigh Group. "A few 
minutes of planning today 
can save valuable time and 
the lives of loved ones down 
the road." 

1. Create a prepared- 
ness kit 

When preparing for an 
emergency or potential di- 
saster, basic survival items 
like fresh water and non- 
perishable foods are often 
at the top of the list. Just 
as important are necessi- 
ties like blankets, a first aid 
kit, transistor radio, flash- 
lights, batteries, cell phone 
with charger, prescription 
medications, cash or trav- 
eler's checks and even a can 



opener. 

Extra items such as tools, 
matches and a compact, 
easy-to-use fire extinguisher 
should also be included in 
your safety kit. The new 
Tundra fire extinguishing 
spray offers a familiar aero- 
sol design and operation 
with no pin to pull or lever 
to squeeze - making it less 
intimidating to operate than 
a standard fire extinguisher. 
These items should be kept 
in a convenient, secure and 
dry location in the basement 
or another area of the home 
with no outside windows. 

2. Set alarms 

Carbon monoxide (CO) 
poisoning incidents esca- 
late during hurricane sea- 
son and heavy wind storms 
due to more frequent power 
outages when homeowners 
turn to fuel -burning genera- 
tors or other fuel sources to 
cook, light, cool or heat their 
homes. To protect your fam- 
ily from this "silent killer," 
CO alarms should be in- 
stalled throughout the home, 
including one on each level 
and outside every sleeping 
area. 



3. Store valuables in a 
"safe" place 

Even if you live in the 
safest town in America, hav- 
ing a safe at home can prove 
a wise investment when it 
comes to natural disasters. 
Through fire or flood, a safe 
can help protect important 
documents, family photos 
and sentimental keepsakes, 
as well as jewelry and other 
valuables. For the ultimate 
protection, look for a safe 
that is both fire resistant and 
waterproof, not just water 
resistant. Be sure to keep 
the combination in a secure 
place and share the location 
only with trusted family 
members and friends. Some 
safes offer fingerprint tech- 
nology that recognize up to 
10 different prints - allow- 
ing for quick and easy ac- 
cess during an emergency. 

4. Keep security front 
and center 

Doors and windows are 
particularly vulnerable spots 
in a home during a major 
storm or national disaster. 
Proper storm doors can pro- 
tect exposed areas of the 
home from wind, precipita- 



tion and debris. For homes 
and businesses, vertical 
window guards like those 
offered by Leslie Locke 
help to keep flying debris 
from breaking glass and ex- 
posing a home's interior to 
outside elements. Security 
screen doors and window 
guards also can help keep 
homes safe from unwanted 
intrusion. 

5. Secure outdoor items 

High winds can take a toll 
on the outside of a home. At 
the first sign of danger, se- 
cure outdoor items using 
rope or other cordage prod- 
ucts to tie down outdoor 
furniture, plants, decorative 
items and more. A new rope 
innovation called Cordzilla 
offers bungee-style stretch 
with vinyl-coated hooks that 
help securely tie down items 
without scratching their sur- 
faces. 

For a complete home 
safety kit checklist or more 
information on National 
Preparedness Month, visit 
www.ready.gov, www. 

homesafety counci I .org or 
www.firstalert.com. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 



Blending Historic Charm With Modern Convenience At Home 



(ARA) - Easily distin- 
guishable from their con- 
temporary counterparts, 
most older homes hold a 
notable grace and prov- 
enance. A look so inspiring 
that many of today's home 
owners are attempting to 
capture this essence of the 
Old World when building 
new or remodeling their 
current home. The "latest 
revivals" trend seamlessly 
blends history with modem 
conveniences. 

"Many newer homes are 
infused with architectural 
details from the past. Good 
traditional design is about 
creating a home with heri- 
tage and character while in- 
corporating elements that 
have proven to stand the 
test of time," says Nancy 
E. Berry of New Old House 
magazine. 

One way to capture the 
look of classic architecture 
is to work with ceramic tile 
which offers supreme du- 
rability, sustainability and 
timeless beauty. Versatility 



in design, size, format and 
texture also allows it to be 
applied in some imexpected 
ways. Advanced technology 
allows for replicate finishes 
virtually indistinguishable 
from the real thing. You can 
achieve the look of wall- 
paper, wainscoting, wood, 
stone and textiles but with 
the durability and property 
advantages of tile. Both 
flooring and wall tiles do 
not show wear and do not 
require heavy cleaning. 

Once installed, ceramic 
tile will not require costly 
replacement and repair. It 
offers supreme durability, 
directly related to the im- 
pervious glazed surface, 
and a longer lifespan than 
most floor and wall cover- 
ings. Unlike wood that rots 
and needs refinishing, or 
carpeting that loses its pile 
and shows wear, ceramic 
tile lasts up to four times 
longer. 

Additionally, ceramic tile 
is chemically inert, so there 
is no mold or mildew build 



up or chance of damage 
from outside sources. It's 
frost-resistant and fire-resis- 
tant as it will not bum, give 
off smoke or toxic fumes. 

You can achieve a clas- 
sic style with easy mainte- 
nance and sustainable char- 
acteristics. Warm water and 
neutral cleaners are the only 
cleaning products required. 
Ceramic tile does not con- 
tribute to the level of toxic 
cleaning products being 
flushed into our ecosystem 
by materials that recom- 
mend the use of chemicals, 
soaps, shampoos, waxes, 
strippers, and solvents. 

For example, Tile of 
Spain-branded manufactur- 
ers produce ceramic tile that 
can easily pass for marble 
but is more cost effective, 
resilient and easier to main- 
tain. Peronda reinvents mar- 
ble with the Clays and Sym- 
phony Collections. Qays 
raises a solid concept where 
neutral colors define bases. 
Symphony shows the beau- 
ty of stones such as Calacata 



marble, Daino travertine, 
Onice Ambar and Marquina 
to inspire a sophisticated 
environment with classic 
Greco-Roman style. 

Terra cotta is a natural 
choice for spaces attempt- 
ing to reflect bygone eras. 
This material is also the cor- 
nerstone of production for 
Ceramica Decorativa which 
recently introduced Ter- 
racota Colors ~ chocolate- 
colored floor tile ~ and the * 
Tao series which features 
long ribs of terra cotta ar- 
ranged in different patterns 
in a 10-inch by 10-inch for- 
mat. Natucer's new Tierras 
Ibericas collection offers 
three series showcasing the 
charm of terra cotta. 

Adex has nine differ- 
ent series in a wide range 
of styles including Antigua, 
Barroca and Artisan. Some 
recover the splendor of Va- 
lencian tiles and some reflect 
ceramic tradition, carefully 
adapted and redesigned for 
contemporary decorations. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 




Anwx Uttttf, Inc. 



49 Beale St., Quincy, MA 02170 
. 617-472-4330 

Over 70 Seller and Buyer Agents 

specializing in Residential, Commercial 

Real Estate, Bank Owned Properties, 

Short Sales and Rentals 



Annex Real Estate School 

Offering Sdlesperson's, Broker's and Continuing Ed. cidsse's 



Fi A viN REALTY 



FLAVIN 



Confute Real Estate Service Since 1925 



.S;ik's Rentuls 
A|)|)r;iis<ils 



COMMITTED TO PROPERTY OWNERSHIP 




i« 



Still Number One' 




FREE OPINION OF VALUE 

I Flavin & Flavin 1085 Hancock St. 
Visit: www.flavinandflavin.com 



^^^^T^'^- 



617-479-1000 



Ihursdav. July 23, 2009 THe Qtaincy Svux Page 19 



FLYNN AUCTIONS 




PRIVATE SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION 

Auction to be held on the premises 

I I Bayberry Lane, Weston, MA 





Custom gated estate colonial with over 6100 sq ft of living space on 1.3 manicured, landscaped 
acres. Privately sited on culde-sac this beautiful home offers a lighted tennis/basketball court, 
spectacular bluestone patio, steam bath with shower, gourmet kitchen, game room, five bed- 
rooms, five full and two half baths. Incredible 10 ft. ceilings, detailed moldings, open floor plan, 
enclosed yard, and more. Convenient to downtown Boston, major routes and schools. 

2% Broker Participation • 6% Buyer's Premium • MA UC #300 




FLYNN PROPERTIES 



UNITS FOR SALE OR LEASE 



SMWISIMMSS' 





FOR LEASE 




Quincy- Multiple suites available in premier Qown Colony Park loca- 
tion. Four suites available of Z247 SF, 3,33 1 SF, 3,500 SF and 7, 1 00 SF. 
Contiguous to 1 0,43 1 SF. Amenities indude hotels, banking shuttle 
service, food sen/ice, health dub and mions. Parking ratio is 3.5/ 1 ,000 
RSF Some turn-key space available Flexible terms, competitive rents 



Marshfield - Brand New Office Condos. Several units for sale. 
Ideal for medical/prof offices. 8 1 Car Parking, Elevator, Handicap 
lavatories, Central Air, Basement Storage, Excellent access just 
off exit 1 2 on Route 3. 5 layouts to choose from. Call for floor 
plans. Pnces start at $269,000. 



South Boston Seaport - 2,400 SF of Office/Commercial 
Space. Class B office Space. 2 onsite parking spaces. MBTA 
accessible via Silver Line from South Station. Sublet with 5 
years remaining. Below market @ $20/FT. 



FOR SALE or LEASE } 





FOR LEASE 




Quincy - Gas and Auto Body Shop. 3,600+/- SF building. 
1 2' walls, 4 drive-in doors, steel tanks, full service Vita 
Root reporting system. Outside Kiosks, Gilbarco dispens- 
ers/5 Blend, Spray booth and frame machine. 



Braintree - Office Condo for Sale - Currently a Law Office. 
749 SF located at 409 Pond at Granite and Pond. Three execu- 
tive offices and an open admin/sales area good for 3 employees. 
Private entrance and bath. Storage space in unit plus basement 
space. Pnce Reduced to $ I 57,500, 



Quincy - Office Space for Lease. Pre^i^ier space waiting 
distance to Wollaston T Station, Space from 1 ,400+/- SF to 
1 2,400+/- SF full floor suites, featunng creative design wrthm 
pi'ofessional atmosphere. Below market rents. Full %e paid to 
cooperating broKers, 



FOR SALE 




FOR SALE or LEASE 



' jH 




FOR LEASER 



rTTi ■■» «• 






-- \: 



UNDER AGREEMENT 



Quincy - 1 3,863 SF commercial building on 24,200 SF lot. Fully 
occupied. Includes 90'x 1 1 0' warehouse w/ 1 6' clearance. 35x20' 
refrigerated space with 2 loading doors and dock, five private 
offices totalling 800 +/- SR Modem, updated, fully occupied. Off 
Rte. 3A near Southern Artery. Offered at $ 1 ,350,000. 




Weymouth - Industnal Complex featunng 3 Ind. buildings on 2 
+/- Acne comer lot Two attached buildings combine for a total of 
19,938 SF. 16,795+/- sf of warehouse/manufactunng 3,|-43+/- sf 
of office space plus 1,500 SF storage bidg. Active indus. park near 
exits on Rte 3. High ceilings. Call for leasing tenms. $ 1 .75 Million. 



Raynham - Located on Rte, 44 Auto mile close to Rts. 24 & 
495. 14,523 +/- SF building on approxiamately 25 acres featunng 
multiple sales offices, upper mezzanine offices, open sf^ow room & 
customer service area and lar^e automotive service area. Offered 
at$l7,000/monthNNN, 



NEED CASH FAST? 

SELL NOW AT AUCTION! 

Call for a quick assessment! 



(6 I 7) 479-9000 • DJFIynn.com • 1495 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 



Danic^ 



Page 20 Tl&e Qtiinosr Sun Thursday, July 23,2009 



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A Home Improvement Project That Pays You Back 4 Ways 



(ARA) - Do you think 
that the bailout is only for 
the big guys? Think again. 

There's a home improve- 
ment project this year that 
ntn only adds value and 
curb appeal to \(>ur home, 
bu! s:nes encry\ and otters 
up to a Si. 5(H) federal tax 
credit to homeowners. The 
project'.' A >t\': h ;ievv msu- 
laled garav 

Huge tux credit 

Qu.u insulated 

garage innvhased in 

20rt<-) ;ind 2uiO earn a size- 
able ia\ credit -- more valu- 
able t'- \n a ta\ deduction 

Dollars 
sense 

by David Uffington 



- that reduces taxes dollar- doors can be found at Ga- 
for-dollar from the bottom rageWowNow.com, a non- 
line of your federal tax bill, commercial Web site spon- 
Llndcr legislation passed sored by the garage door 
in 2008. the tax credit maxed industry. 



in the temperature of your look, a throwback to yes- rage door styles? 
home while helping to re- teryear that fools the eye by A wide vanety of new 

duce your energy bills in echoing the hinged, swing- styles are featured at Ga- 

out door styles of quaint and rageWowNow.com to point 

charming carriage houses - you in the right direction. 



and 



Cash for 
Clunkers 



out at $500 or 10 percent of 
the product cost. But under 
the federal stimulus legisla- 
tion announced in February 
2tX)9. the tax credit tripled 
to 30 percent oi the prod- 
uct c(>'-t, up to a nia\iniiim 
of > 1 .500. IhiN me;in^ that 
the uO(.<! ;)clps pay [or ilscit 
throng!) i''c la.\ credii incen- 
»i\e. 

hull derail, on the ta.\ 
credit and qiuiiitving jiaiage 

for a S3 .500 voucher 

• If you trade m a pickup 
or SI 'V (including' a !nin!\ an) 
that gels i^S mpij or ie.ss and 
you buy a similar vehicle that 
i!ets 2 nipg more, you (jualify 
for a $3,500 voucher. 

• 11 )ou Ir.idv- m a pickup 
or SUV i including a nuni- 



Energy savings 

The driving factor behind 
the tax credit is energy sav- 
ings - another money saver 
for homeowners and a posi 
tivc step feu the envno!! 
ment. Homeowners find that 
the room next to the iiaiau;e 
!> v>tt(.n the (.oldest looin in 
the winter. 

Older, non-insulated <ja- 
ragc doors can alK)w coid 
air m the wuitcr and warm 
air in the summer to enter 
the house, increasing heat- 
ing and cooling costs. A 
neu, qualifying insulated 
door can make a difference 



both winter and summer. 

New styles boost curb 
appeal 

In the last five years, a 
new breed of stylish garage 
doors has hit the market 
And adding style to your 
home means adding value 
as well. 

A iiarage door typi- 
call) makes up more than 
one ilur.i ot a home's front 
lacade A "'plain vanilla" 
iiarage door can make your 
home look bland and boring 
-■ especially if it look^ just 
like every other garage door 
on your street. 

The latest styles offer: 

• The carriage house 



yet the doors open just like 
any other modern garage 
door. 

• Sleek, contemporary 
doors available in vibrant 
colors, opaque glass and 
aluminum, and a range of 
metallic iinishes to comple- 
ment modem homes 

• Steel raised-panei doors 
u ith a Hood grain print '-ur 
iaee that leiiuires minimal 
maintenance, beautifulK 
imitating the rich colors and 
patterns of real wood. 

Get the job done 
Don't know where to be- 
gin in looking for new ga- 



Before and after images on 
the Web site allow you to 
see how new garage doors 
have drarhatically changed 
the appearance of homes 
.\[v] if )ou find a door that 
catcher your tancy, the door 
manufacturer is eiearh list- 
ed and you can g^) tiiiectly 
to their Web sites 

Xnd remember, installa- 
[\rn\ i- best lett 'o the pros. 
(iai.sL'eVNow Nov\ .c(>m's ZIP 
code search function will 
help you find a professional 
in your area who can in- 
stall your ne\\ door in a few- 
hours. 

Cout /('s \ of ARAcoHtcnt 



Eliminate Garage Grime: Simple Summer Clean-Up Solutions 



The go\en:;::.;!t s Ca^h 
For Clunkers program can 
help get gas guzzlers off the 
road and shave thousands of 
dollars off the price of a new 
vehicle. 

Passenger vehicles that 
are traded in must be newer 
than 1984 models and get 
less than 18 mpg. For certain 
trucks, the model year must 



(ARA) - Summer is here 
and it's time to clean the ga- 
rage. The garage door will 
inevitably be open and you 
don't want to be einbarrassed 
when the neighbors stop by. 
ing between 6.000 and 8.500 jo you'' Take the time to 
pounds that get 15 mpg qual- give the space a thorough 
ify for vouchers of between cleaning and update. There 
$3,500 and S4 .500. are a number of simple 

• Finally, if an older ve- steps you can take to clean 



van) that gets 18 mpg or less 
your nev\ xe'ucle nitisi. uet at 
least 5 mph higher to quaiily 
for a .$4,500 voucher. 

• Trucks and vans weiyh- 



do is wipe it off with a wet 
rag. I'he paint won't become 
discolored or chip off. It's 
even strong enough to han- 
dle scrubbing with a sponge. 
Plus. Pratt & Lambert offers 
more than 1.000 colors, so 
you can create a distinctive 
look. 

Power wash 
and kitty clean 
Once you have the walls 



Waterproofed 
and weatherized 

Notoriously, the garage 
is a receptacle for dirt, mud, 
salt and water. Dirt and wa- 
ter from car tires, lawn mow- 
ers, snow blowers and gar- 
den tools all seem to meld 
into one big mess that defies 
cleaning. Not only does this 
mess make the garage look 
bad, these elements can have 
a very detrimental effect on 



hide has a trade-in value and organize your garage so 

greater than the amounts be- that when your neighbors do sealed and painted, you can 
be 2001 and 15 mpg. The '"g offered, you won't ben- walk by, they'll be amazed now power wash the con- your garage floor. One way 
vehicle must be drivable. efit from the vouchers. at the transformafion. crete floor without concern to combat the wear and tear 
You can't take an old vehicle If a dealer is offering in- Colorful, but still clean about damaging exposed is to consider waterproofing 
from a junkyard and use it to cenfives such as thousands Stroll by a dozen open dry wall. Many large home the concrete with a protec- 
trade in. All vehicles that are of dollars off the price of a garages and you'll likely see and hardware stores will rent live coating, 
traded in are to be scrapped vehicle, you can add that one common thread. All the out power washers by the Many companies offer 
to get them off the road. discount to the voucher garages are painted white, hour or day. Power washing simple do-it-yourself coat- 
Here are some specifics amounts. The dealers them- There's no rule against is relatively easy and you'll ings kits, such as H & C 
for the program: selves will get the vouchers painting the walls of your be amazed at how effective Coatings' Shield Crete. This 



Just about every garage 
in America has the standard- 
issue white organi/er shelv- 
ing. Ihough the shelving 
does provide functionality, 
it snil doesn't look clean. 
All the car washing spong- 
es, bug spray, small garden 
tools and miscellaneous 
tools are still visible and sit- 
ting out. 

Instead of shelving, in- 
stall storage cabinets. There 
are dozens of industrial 
grade and strength garage 
storage cabinets that will 
help hide all of the small 
items that you store in your 
garage behind magnetic, 
closable doors. Even if you 
still can't seem to organize 
the items inside the cabi- 



• You must buy your new 
vehicle between July 1 and 
Nov. 1,2009. 

• The new vehicle must 
cost less than $45 ,000. 

• You must have been the 
owner of record of the old 
vehicle for a minimum of 
one year. 

• If you trade in a passen- 
ger car that gets 18 mpg or 
less, the new vehicle must 
get 10 mpg more to qualify 
for the $4,500 voucher 

• If you trade in a passen- 
ger car that gets 18 mpg or 
less, the new vehicle must 
get 4 mpg more to qualify 



from the government via garage something other than it is at removing dirt and garage floor coating protects nets, at least they won't be 



electronic access. white. But, choosing paint paint splatter from your ga- 

If you're unsure what gas for your garage is more than rage floor, 
mileage your current vehicle color. Garage paint has to be Once the floor is clean, 

strong enough to withstand break out the kitty litter. 

grin\e, water and general That's right; kitty litter is an 

dirt. excellent absorbent and can 

Consider applying a paint remove those hard-to-clean 



gets, go online to www.fuele- 
conomy.gov for information. 
Any new vehicle will have 
the mileage on the window 
sticker. 



concrete against gasoline, 
motor oil, antifreeze, road 
salt and even hot tires. It 
also creates a glossy, show- 
room-like finish that hides 
imperfections like cracks 
or unsightly stains and eas- 



visible, and it will provide a 
much cleaner appearance to 
your garage. 

Once you've cleaned and 
sealed the floor, painted the 
walls and housed all your 
miscellaneous tools and 



David Uffington regrets that he 
cannot personally answer reader 
questions, but will incorporate 
them into his column whenever 
possible. Write to him in care oj 
King Features Weekly Service, 
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando. FL 
32853-6475, or send e-mail to col- 
umnreply@grTUiil.com. 

© 2009 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



that is specifically designed oil stains. Simply spread the ily cleans up with soap and supplies in storage cabinets, 

for durability, like Pratt & kitty litter on the stain and water. Available in eight you're ready for the fun 

use a heavy object, such as colors, it includes optional 

a brick, to work the kitty lit- decorative flakes to give that 

ter into the stain. Once it's previously boring garage 

worked in, let it sit for a few floor just the right finishing 

hours before sweeping up. touch. One easy-to-apply kit 

After you're all swept up, can cover up to 250 square 

finish by taking a stiff-bris- feet and is water-based with 

tied brush and some soapy virtually no odor. 



Lambert's Porcelain paint 
line. The paint is actually in- 
fused with bonded ceramic 
beads that create an impen- 
etrable film that doesn't al- 
low dirt and stains to set in. 
So, if you're cleaning your 
lawn mower and happen to 




OnAiqi^ 




Abigail Adams 

Serious About Celling 
The South Shore 

Buyers & Seller Representation 
Residential Sales & Rentals 
Internet Marketing 
Quincy-Norwell-Marshfield 

617»471«7575 

www.C21abigailadams.com 



Jayne magown 
Owner Broker 
RE Instovctor 



splash grassy, muddy water water to clean any remain- 
on the wall, all you have to ing residue. 



Storage, not shelving 



part; relaxing. Plus, the fact 
that these simple solufions 
provide lasting durability 
means that next year, you 
won't have to do this again. 

For more intbnnation on 
Pratt & Lambert, visit www. 
prattandlambert.com. 

Courtesy of ARAcontent 



Realty Pros 




Buying, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For All Your 
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QUiNCY - (617) 328-3200 

On the Web visit McFarlandproperties.com 





JULIE BERBERAN 

REALTOR* 

Cell 617 283-2994 
Office 617 775-2020 ext. 121 
Fax 617 786 7924 
juUet)erberan#acrf.com 

7 Beak Sueei, OuixKy, MA 02170 




|U^ 



I hursday, July 23. 20(>9 The Q\xincy Sun Page 2 1 





o<xxx><x<>oc<<><x><><x<<xxxxxxxxxx><xx^^ 



-OOCKXXXX 



Sun Sports 

II & 12-Year Old HOO- Meter Regional Champion 

Quincy's Michael Mullaney 
To Run For National Title 



MIKE MULLANEY (center) holds up his MA State Finalist t-shirt with Recreation Director 
Barry J. Welch (left) and Geoff Hennessey, Director of Quincy IVack Club (right), looking on. 



By SEAN BRKNNAN 

Quincy's Mike Mullancv. 
a 12-ycar old and soon-lo- 
be seventh grader at Central 
Middle School, is one step 
closer to being crowned 
a National Champion in 
the S(K)-meter event of the 
Hershey's National Track 



.^ ^ 



On Behalf of the 
Quincy High School Boys and Girls Basketball Team 

and the Quincy High School Cheerleaders 

The QHS Basketball Boosters and Coaches would like 

to thank the following sponsors for their support of our 

successful March 2009 calendar fund raising efforts 



Mayor Tom Koch 

David McCarthy, 

Quincy School Committee 

State Representative Ron Mariano 

Dan Raymondi, City Councilor 

Michael McFarland, 

Quincy School Committee 

Jay Davis, City Councilor 

The Outback Steakhouse 

Coop's Bar & Grille 

Edible Arrangements 

Fuji 1 546 Restaurant & Bar 

Beni Cafe 

Goal Post Bar & Grille 

Star's Restaurant 

Eat' in Healthy 



The Four's Restaurant 



Mike and Julie Norton 

Tom and Mary Mullaney 

Doug Gutro, Council President 

State Senator 

Michael Morrissey 



The Granite Rail 



Hair Place One 



Aura's Salon 



Pure Chocolate 



Fat Cat Restaurant 



Finians Restaurant 



Bad Abbots 



Imperial Terrace 

McKay's Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 

Stop and Shop 

Firestone 



The Quincy Sun 



A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO: 

Steve Desjardins of The Outback Steakhouse, 

Stop and Shop, 

Quincy High School Principal Frank Santoro, 

Athletic Director Jim Rendle and all the volunteers. 

We Could not have done it without your support. 

Good Luck with the New Quincy High School 



and Field Cjames I he na- 
tional tmals uill be held Jul> 
3- August 2 in Hershc) Park. 
Fenns)|\ania 

Mullane> started ott his 
journey to the national staee 
b\ winning the S(K)-meter 
event at the Quincv Recre- 
ation Departments quali- 
fier; he followed that up b\ 
winning the Massachusetts 
S(X)-metcr state champion- 
ship, which was held June 29 
in Bolton. Mullaneys win- 
ning time was 2: 36. XI After 
claiming the MA state title, 
Mullaney was forced to wait 
until all the other SfK)-metcr 
state champions from Re- 
gion 6. which includes par- 
ticipants from Maine, Neu 
Hampshire. Vermont. Rhode 
Island and two provinces of 
Canada, were decided. His 
time held up as the best in 
Region 6 and he got the call 
that he would be the one rep- 
resenting the region in the 
11-12-year old 8{X)-meter 
national championships. 

"I started off winning the 
Quincy meet and then I went 
on and won the 8(K)-meter 
event at the state finals,"" 
said Mullaney last week. 
"Once I won the states. I had 
to wait for the other results 
and times from Region 6 to 
come in. My time held up 
The other winners from this 
region ran around the 2.3S 
and 2:40 mark. My fam- 
ily said not to get my hopes 
up because we \vere one of 
the first states to finish, but 
I kept checking the results 
and 1 finally got the call that 
1 would be representing Re- 
gion 6 and nov\ I get to run 
in the nationals."" 

Mullaney. a humble 
youngster, has been run- 
ning since an early age and 
has been a member of the 
Quinc) Track Club since 
age eight. He is one of four 
siblings who run daily and 
running is a major part o\ his 
life. 

■'! have been running with 
the Quincy Track Club since 
I was eight and my whole 
family likes to run. 1 ha\e a 
brother. Jake, who is 16 and 
twin sisters. Danielle and 
Brianna, who are 14 So if I 
do not have track practice my 
famil> runs on the beach or 
around the city. 1 like to run 
with other people because 
it helps you get better and 
train harder. The QTC helps 
me train during the summer 
and gets me ready for the fall 
when 1 run cross country.'" 

Mullaney. who prefers 
running longer distances, 
expects the national finals 
to be a challenge, but he is 
ready to give it his best and 
represent Quincy as well as 




MIKE Ml LLANKY 

he can. 

"it kK)ks like at the na- 
tionals, in this event, the 
top times are usually around 
2 20 but I am going to go 
there and do my best I am 
going to be fiying doun 
there vMth the rest of the 
champions from my region 
and my parents, Carol) n and 
Jim. are planning on ccnmng 
down and cheering me on. It 
should be fun."" 

.Mul lanes was one ol tour 
Quincv qualifiers who won a 
state championship on June 
29. but he was the only one 
who captured the regional 
crown Other Quincy resi- 
dents who won a state title 
were .Mark Chandler, l.au- 
ren Peine and Lconor Guar- 
dadt). 

The Quinc) Recreation 
Department has been spon- 
soring and supervising the 
local Hershey's qualilier 
since I9"'S and has sent oth- 
er vouths to the national fi- 
nals in the past, the most no- 
table being Karen ("ashman, 
who went on to win a briHi/e 
medal at the 1994 Olvmpic 
W inter Games. She qualified 
hve times. 

"The Hershey "s Games 
are undoubtedly the best 
youth program in the coun- 
try," said QRD Director Bar- 
r> J. Welch. "They are long 
time corporate sponsors w ho 
provide millions of youths at 
the grass n>ot level with the 
opportunity to improve their 
self conrtdence. build mem- 
(^ries. and friendships in an 
Olympic-like atmosphere 
while the participants are at 
a very impressionable age 

"It IS more than a track 
meet The program is run in 
Amenca with the coopera- 
tion of the National Recre- 
atuni and Park Association 
and Olympic Decathlon 
Champion Rafer Johnson is 
the Games' Honorary Chair- 
person and will address the 
youngsters at the finals "" 



Page 22 Tl&e Quimoy S\&n Thursday, July 23, 2009 



Team Was Scheduled to Play Wednesday Afternoon 

Morrisette Making Noise 
In AL South Sectionals 



By SEAN BRENNAN 

Morrisette Post 294, de- 
spite a 7-3 loss to Foxboro 
Post 93 on Monday eve- 
ning, was still alive, as of 
The Quincy Sun press dead- 
line Tuesday, in the Ameri- 
can Legion South Sectional 
playoffs. Morrisette had ad- 
vanced to this round follow- 
ing a two games-to-one first 
round series victory over 
Norwood Legion. 

The team opened the 
South Sectionals, a three- 
bracket, 12-team, double- 
elimination playoff, with 
a come-from-behind, 10-9 
win over New Bedford Le- 
gion on Sunday night at 
Paul Walsh Field at New 
Bedford High School. 

Morrisette was sched- 
uled, weather permitting, 
to play New Bedford on 
Wednesday afternoon in a 
win-or-go-home game. The 
winner of this game would 
then have to defeat Foxboro 
Legion twice to advance to 
the American Legion Mas- 
sachusetts state finals. 

Morrisette, which was 
one of the lowest seeds in 
the South Sectional bracket, 
shocked top-seeded New 
Bedford on Sunday, com- 
ing from three runs down in 
the top of the ninth inning to 
earn the 10-9 win. 

Starting pitcher Kevin 
Magoon (four plus innings, 
7 BB, 3 Ks, three earned 
runs) spotted New Bedford 
an early 4-0 lead, but Mor- 
risette 's offense scored five 
runs in the top of the fourth 
inning to grab a 5-4 lead. 
Joe Vialpando started the 
rally with a single; Ricky 
Salvucci singled; Matt 
Rodriquez singled; John 
Ainsley singled, driving in 
Vialpando; Devin Hudson 
doubled home both Salvuc- 
ci and Rodriquez; Greg Nel- 
son singled home Hudson 
and Daimy Russell plated 
the final run with a fielder's 
choice groundout. 

New Bedford, the host 
team, rallied back to take 



the 9-6 lead and was three 
outs away from putting 
Morrisette in the loser's 
bracket, but this Morrisette 
team is resilient. 

Nelson started the ninth 
with a single and after Rus- 
sell struck out, a pitch hit 
Alex Tragellis. Vialpando 
(4-for-5) singled; Salvucci 
drove in Nelson with a 
sacrifice fly (9-7 score); 
Rodriquez singled home 
Tragellis (9-8 score); Ain- 
sley walked and then Ryan 
Louis came up with the big- 
gest hit of the season thus 
far. On a 3-2 count, Louis 
drove a sharp base hit into 
right field, scoring both Ro- 
driquez and Ainsley, with 
the latter being the game- 
winning run. 

Relief pitcher Ben Leahy 
(two innings, 2 Ks, W) set 
down New Bedford 1-2-3 to 
close out the upset win. 

"This team just does not 
quit," said Morrisette 's Bill 
Marchand. "Our confidence 
is way up and we have been 
beating the better teams. 
New Bedford thought the 
game was over before the 
ninth inning, but we battled 
back and grabbed the win. 
We have had timely hitting 
and great defensive play 
throughout the playoffs and 
this was a big win for us. 
They are starting to think 
that they can win against 
anyone." 

Salvucci (3-for-4), Ro- 
driquez (2-for-5), Louis 
(l-for-4, RBI) and Hudson 
(two RBI) were the hitting 
stars for Morrisette against 
New Bedford. Relief pitcher 
Joe Edgerly (three innings, 
K) pitched well out of the 
bullpen. 

The team advanced to the 
second round by upsetting 
the higher seeded Norwood 
Legion in the opening round 
of the American Legion Dis- 
trict 6 East- West playoffs. 
Morrisette, which was the 
fourth seed out of District 6 
East, opened the first-round 
at Norwood, which was the 



District 6 West number two 
seed. 

In Game One, Morrisette 
lost 5-4 despite having the 
bases loaded in the seventh 
and final inning. Edgerly 
kept his team in contention 
with two scoreless innings 
of relief. 

"We kind of had the 
feeling that even after we 
lost, we had Norwood on 
the ropes," said Marchand. 
"In the seventh we loaded 
the bases, but could not get 
across that last run, but the 
team and the coaching staff 
felt confident that we could 
come back and win the next 
two games." 

In Game Two, Mor- 
risette's Alex Tragellis (7 
innings, BB, 7 Ks, W) was 
masterful on the mound. 
He threw a complete game 
shutout as Morrisette won 
3-0. 

"Alex was so good in 
this game. He did exactly 
what we needed from him 
and pitched us into the third 
and final game," added 
Marchand. 

In Game Three, Mor- 
risette went up 3-0 after 2 
Vi innings only to see Nor- 
wood score five runs in the 
bottom of the third to take a 
5-3 lead, but a six-run fourth 
inning propelled the team to 
victory. 

Ryan Louis started the 
rally with a single; Hudson 
hit a two-run home run to 
tie the score at 5-5; Nelson 
reached on an error; Rus- 
sell made the first out; Co- 
lin Ryan reached on an er- 
ror; Rodriquez was hit by a 
pitch; Salvucci reached on 
an error scoring Nelson and 
Vialpando drove in two runs 
with a single. 

Morrisette would tack on 
five more runs in the sixth 
and ran away with the de- 
ciding game and the series 
with a 15-5 victory. 

Ricky Salvucci (2 2/3 in- 
nings, 3 Ks, W) picked up 
the win in relief. 



South Shore Teams To Play At Adams Field 

9* Annual Patrick White Baseball 
Tournament July 31 -Aug 2 



The 9* Annual Patrick 
White Jimmy Fund Base- 
ball Tournament is sched- 
uled for the weekend of 
July 31 -Aug. 2 at Quincy 's 
Adams Field. 

The annual event is 
played in honor of Patrick 
White who participated in 
Quincy Youth Baseball pro- 
grams. White battled Rhab- 
domyosarcoma, a form of 
tissue cancer, for over six 
years; he passed away in the 



fall of 2005. 

The public is welcome to 
attend the toumament and 
admission is free. Dona- 
tions are appreciated. 

Fimds raised by the 
toumament will benefit the 
Pediatric Solid Tumor Pro- 
gram at Dana-Farber Chil- 
dren's Hospital Cancer Care 
Services. Over the past eight 
years, the event has raised 
over $163,000. 

Teams from the South 



Shore, including two teams 
from Quincy, with players 
15-years old and younger 
will participate in the an- 
nual toumey. Anyone in- 
terested in volunteering 
to help with concessions 
or aimouncing the games 
should contact Paul White, 
Toumament Co-Director, at 
617-786-8612. 

For additional informa- 
tion, contact Bob Griffin at 
617-472-4811. 




MEMBERS OF THE QUINCY YOUTH BASEBALL 14-under all-star baseball team celebrate 
after winning the 14-Under Junior League Championship in District 8 of the MA "Little League" 
Tournament. Quincy will now compete in the Section 2 of the MA state playoffs. 

Defeat Norwell 9-4 to Take Title 

QYB's 14-Under Team Wins 
District 8 Championship 



Quincy Youth Baseball's 
14-under all-star baseball 
team swept through the Dis- 
trict 8 playoffs, finishing 
with a 4-0 record, and win- 
ning the 14-Under Junior 
League championship game, 
9-4, over Norwell. The team, 
as a result of their dominance 
in this round, now moves 
on to Section 2 of the MA 
State Playoffs where they 
will be competing against 
all-star teams from Auburn, 
East Bridgewater, Gardner, 
Seekonk and Southampton. 

In the title game against 
Norwell , Quincy jumped out 
to a first inning lead when a 
pitch hit Pat Verhault. Pinch 
runner Andrew Currie stole 
second and scored on a line 
drive double by Mike Gal- 
lotto. Norwell came back to 
tie the game in the home half 
of the first, but Quincy an- 
swered with two runs in the 
top of the second. Tom Mc- 
Donald and Matt Davis led 
off with back-to-back singles 
and both moved into scoring 
position on a wild pitch. An- 
drew Jaehnig scored McDon- 
ald with a sacrifice fly and 
Davis scored on wild pitch. 

Norwell scored a lone mn 
in the bottom of the frame to 
cut the Quincy lead to 3-2, 
but again, Quincy responded. 
Verhault started the third 
inning with a single, stole 
second and third; Galloto 
walked; Currie pinch ran and 



stole second and Josh Hay- 
ward drove in Verhault with 
a sacrifice fly. 

After Norwell scored to 
cut the Quincy lead to 5-4, 
pitching took over and kept 
things quiet through the 
fourth, fifth and sixth in- 
nings. 

During the bottom of the 
sixth Quincy dodged a bullet 
as Norwell got the first two 
runners on base with nobody 
out. The next batter lined to 
Davis at second base, and 
he flipped the ball to Ver- 
hault at shortstop for a mo- 
mentum killing double play. 
That defensive play stopped 
a Norwell rally and ignited 
Quincy 's offense. The team 
added four insurance runs in 
the top of the seventh to put 
the game away. 

The seventh irming rally 
started with a walk to Currie; 
Rudy Tryon scored him with 
a double; David Joyce bunt- 
ed Tryon over to third base; 
Galloto drove in Tryon with 
a double and he scored on a 
suicide squeeze bunt by Hay- 
ward. McDonald drove in the 
final Quincy mn with a dou- 
ble off the left field fence. 

Quincy 's Dan Cobban 
(two mns, two walks, three 
strikeouts) shutdown Nor- 
well 1-2-3 in the bottom of 
the seventh to help set off a 
wild celebration. Cobban re- 
tired 1 1 of the last 13 Norwell 
batters to earn his second vic- 



tory of the toumament. 

Quincy earned the right to 
play for the championship by 
defeating Cohasset 8-5 in the 
semifinals. Tom McDonald 
earned his second victory of 
the toumey despite not hav- 
ing his "best stuff." Hayward 
earned the save in relief. 

Quincy scored one run in 
the first and second innings 
but trailed 4-2 heading into 
the fifth inning. Verhault 
(three hits, three SBs) started 
the fifth inning rally with a 
single and stole second; Gal- 
loto scored him with a RBI 
single and Currie pinch ran 
for him and came around to 
score the tying run. Cobban 
walked, stole second and 
scored the game-winner on 
Hay ward's RBI single. 

Quincy reached the final 
four round of the District 8 
AU-Star Tournament by de- 
feating Hanson (8-2) and 
Canton (5-0). 

Members of the District 
8 championship include Dan 
Cobban , Andrew Currie , Matt 
Davis, Brian Fahey, Mike 
Gallotto, Josh Hayward, TJ 
Hobin, Andrew Jaehnig, Da- 
vid Joyce, Tom McDonald, 
Jason Pekkinen, Mike Pug- 
sley, Kenny Sorenson, Rudy 
Tryon and Patrick Verhault. 
Mark Jaehnig is team man- 
ager and is assisted by Chris 
Pugsley, Paul Cedrone and 
Mike Joyce. 



Directed By Quincy Track Club 

Frank Kelly Memorial Meet To Be 
Held Friday at Braintree HS 



The Frank Kelly Me- 
morial Meet, a sanctioned 
track meet by USATF-New 
England and directed by the 
Quincy Track Qub, will 
be held Friday, July 24 at 
5:30 p.m. at Braintree High 
School. 

The event is for boys and 
girls ages five-under up to 
ages 13-14 (ages as of day- 
of-meet). The list of events 
is as follows: 



8(X)-meter: ages 13- 
14, 11-12 and 10-under; 
4(X)-meter: ages 13-14, 
11-12, 9-10 and 8-under; 
200-meter: ages 13-14, 
11-12, 9-10, 7-8 and 5-6; 
100-meter: ages 13-14, 
11-12, 9-10, 7-8 and 5-6; 
50-meter: ages 13-14, 11- 
12, 9-19 and 7-8; 50-yard 
dash: ages 13-14, 11-12, 
9-10 and 7-8; standing long 
jump: ages 5-6 and 7-8; run- 



ning long jump: ages 9-10, 
11-12 and 13-14; shot put- 
ages 9-10, 11-12 and 13-14; 
high jump: ages 11-12 and 
13-14; Softball throw: ages 
5-6 and 7-8 and turbo jav- 
elin: ages 9-10, 11-12 and 
13-14. 

For additional informa- 
tion, contact Geoff Hen- 
nessy. Meet Director, at 
henndog89@netscape.net 
or at 617-510-1456. 



Ihursdav. J uiv 23,2009 Tbe Qii&incy Sun Page 23 




QUINCY MILITIA QUARTERBACK Matt Boyle launches a pass deep down field during the 
Militia's home-opening 27-26 victory over the Brockton Bucs last Saturday evening at Veterans 
Memorial Stadium. 

Quincy Sun plwtoslLarrv Carchedilwww.northquincy .sinuiiinu^ .com 




A NICE SHOWING of fans came out Saturday evening to cheer on the Quincy Militia at 
Veterans Memorial Stadium. The team's next home game is scheduled for Aug. 8 against the 
Bridgewater (iladiators. 

Home Opener: A 27-26 Win Over Brockton 

Quincy Militia Earn 
Hard-Fought Victory 



The Quincy Militia used 
several big plays and a strin- 
gent second-half defense to 
defeat the Brockton Bucca- 
neers, 27-26, last Saturday 
evening in the team's home 
opener held at Quincy 's Vet- 
erans Memorial Stadium. 

The win pushed the Mili- 
tia's overall record to 2-0 in 
the Eastern Football League 
(EFL). 

The Militia, which held 
a late-game 27-20 lead, 
stopped a potential game- 
winning two-point conver- 
sion by the Brockton offense 
in the waning minutes of the 
fourth quarter to hold on for 
the 27-26 victory. 

Brockton began the game 
by marching down the field 
on a 12-pIay drive, only to 
see the possession stall out 
inside the Militia's 20-yard 
line. After taking over on of- 
fense, Quincy capitalized on 
its second play from scrim- 
mage. Running back Dolan 
Reid took the handoff from 
quarterback Matt Boyle, 
ran off-tackle and bolted 
89-yards for the game's first 
touchdown and a 6-0 lead. 
Placekicker Will Moore's 
point after attempt (PAT) 
was blocked. 

The Buccaneers, a two- 
fime champion of the EFL, 
responded to Quincy 's early 
score with a touchdown of 
its own as quarterback Mark 
Reale connected with a re- 
ceiver on a 25-yard TD pass. 
The score remained 6-6 until 
Boyle and the Militia offense 



connected on its second big 
play of the half. 

On just the team's fourth 
play on offense, Boyle rolled 
left and found a streaking 
Domenique Milton for a 57- 
yard TD pass. Moore's PAT 
attempt sailed through the 
uprights giving Quincy a 
13-6 lead. 

The Buccaneers, behind 
the stellar play of Reale un- 
der center, scored two quick 
touchdowns to give Brock- 
ton a 20-13 first-half lead. 
Reale 's first TD pass went 
for 21 yards to wide receiver 
Richard Garcia and his sec- 
ond was a 17-yard TD pass 
to wide receiver Wayman 
Payne, Sr. 

Facing the possibility of 
trailing by seven points at 
the halftime break, the Mi- 
lifia responded, once again, 
with a big time play on of- 
fense. This time it was kick 
returner AJ McLaughlin who 
answered the call. McLaugh- 
lin took the ensuing kickoff 
after Brockton's third touch- 
down of the half and returned 
it 89 yards, untouched into 
the end zone; the PAT was 
successful and the half ended 
deadlocked at 20-20. 

The Militia coaching staff 
used the break to reorganize 
the team's defense, placing 
more emphasis on getting 
pressure on Reale and it 
seemed to work. Pat Stroud, 
Nicholas Chase and William 
Giddens, all playing on the 
defensive line, pressured 
Reale into rushed throws 



and got to him sacked on 
several occasions, helping 
stall Brockton's offense just 
enough to give Quincy an 
opportunity to take the lead. 

The biggest play of the 
second-half was a bungled 
special teams play by Brock- 
ton. After Quincy forced the 
Bucs into a fourth and 18 
from their own 40-yard line, 
the snapped punt attempt 
sailed over the Brockton's 
punter's head and Quincy re- 
gained offensive possession 
at the Bucs' 10-yard line. 

On the first play from 
scrimmage, McLaughlin 
took the handoff from Boyle 
and barreled his way into the 
end zone, giving Quincy the 
26-20 lead. The PAT was suc- 
cessful and the Militia would 
hold on in the final minutes 
to earn their second straight 
win of the season. 

Next up for the Quincy 
Milifia is an away tilt this 
Saturday against the Clinton 
Irish Blizzard. The game w ill 
be played at 7 p.m. on Fuller 
Field in Clinton, MA The 
team will open up the month 
of August with an away game 
against the Charlestown 
Townies (8/1/09, 7 p.m., 
Charlestown HS) before re- 
turning to Veterans Memo- 
rial Stadium on August 8 to 
play the Bridgewater Gladi- 
ators at 7 p.m. 

Notes: Fans of the team 
can check out game stats and 
information at www.quincs- 
militia.com. 




QIINCY MILITIA'S OFFENSIVE COACH Kevin Callahan gives his troops a talk dui -n„ a 
break in the action during last Saturday's 27-26 win over Brockton. 




■ " ■ - J 









.** 



j^l^^^i^pi^A 



MEMBERS OF THE NEWLY FORMED Quinc> Militia stf.rm out oi tht h*)mt iocKti room at 
the start of the team's home opener last Saturday. 

QRD Instructional Swim 
Program Has Limited Openings 

The Quinc> Recreation 
Department announced 
Tuesday that there are still 
limited openings for Qum- 
cy residents in the Instruc- 
tional Swim Lesson Pro- 
gram that begins Monda>, 
July 27 and ends Fnday. 
August 14. 

The lessons are taught 
from beginner through 
advanced, in accordance 



with the standards of the 
Amencan Red Cross and 
are offered from 1 1 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 

Classes are a half-hour 
to one hour in length de- 
pending on the level of in- 
struction. Participants must 
be six years of age and 
registration for these lim- 
ited openings will be taken 



on a tirst-come-tii>t -serve 
basis from 11 a.m. until 4 
p.m. weekdays at the Lin- 
coln Hancock Communitv 
School Pool for as lone as 
openings exist. 

For additional informa- 
tion, contact the Quincy 
Recreation Department at 
617-376-1305. 



Six Quincy Lacrosse Players 
Shine at Baystate Games 



Six varsity lacrosse play- 
ers from Quincy and North 
Quincy High School shined 
at the recent Baystate Games, 
playing as a part of the Metro 
team. 

Courtney Byrne. Kelly 
Byrne. Maria DiPietro. Dana 
Djcrt and Amanda Mahan. 
all from North Quincv High 
School and Brianne Phelan. 



from Quincv High School, 
plas ed four games at \\ althani 
High School July 7- 12 

On July 9. the Metro team 
plased the Central team and 
\^on 17-14. Phelan. Djerf. 
C. Byrne and DiPietro all 
scored . 

On Julv 10. Courtnev 
B\me scored the game-win- 
ning goal as Metro defeated 



West. 16-15. 

On Jul> 1 1 . Metro played 
the Northeast team and tell 
17-12 Phelan scored on an 
assist from DiPietro and 
.Vtahan uas strt>ng in goal. 
on Sundas. Jul) 12. .Metro 
dropped a 13-12 decision 
to Southeast Coastal Kelly 
Bvrne scored for .Metrcv 



QHS Hockey Golf Tournament Aug. 25 



The Quincy High School 



All proceeds benefit The QHS Boosters are 



Hockey Boosters will be the 2(K)9-10 Quincy High still looking lor hole spon- 

hosting a fundraising golf School boy "> hockey team --ors and businesses to supph 

tournament on Tuesday. Au- The entrance fee is SltK* rattle pn/es ( ontact Cindy 

gust 25 at Furnace Brook and includes a rounded golf. Conley at fiP S2~-6422 for 

CC in Quincy. a cart, a luncheon and gifts. additional intormation 



Pago 24 The Q^iincy Sixn Thursday. July 23, 2009 



ii 




Sports Safety Tips From Milton Hospital's Chief Of Emergency Medicine, Paul Paganelli, M.D. 

Stay On The Field And Out Of The Emergency Room 



Summertime in New 
England brings an explosion 
of youth baseball, softball. 
golf, lacrosse, soccer and 
many other outdoor sports. 
It is always important to 
keep safety a top priority 
when playing sports. As Na- 
tional Youth Sports Week is 
July 20-24. , there is even 
more of a reason to bring 
sports safety to the attention 
of parents, players, coaches 
and spectators. 
Cell Phone Accessibility 
First things first: always 
bring a cell phone wherever 
and whenever you practice 
or play. The seconds and 
minutes post-incident are 
critical to a positive out- 
come. Coaches need a way 
to call 9 1 1 and should always 
know the address of where 
they are located. Having 
a cell phone on site means 
having immediate access to 
it, so carry it in your pock- 
et or leave it on the bench. 
Do not leave it in your car. 
Remember that spectators 
can also have medical inci- 
dents. Anticipate problems 
your audience could have 
whether it's peanut aller- 
gies or issues specific to 
older crowds. You may be 
trained to teach a 10-year to 
catch a baseball but you're 
not expected to be a doctor. 
If a problem occurs, call for 
help right away. 

Watch the Weather 
According to the Na- 
tional Athletic Trainers' 
Position Statement on 
Lightning, lightning is one 
of the top three causes of 
weather-related deaths. It 



kills approximately 100 
people yearly and is respon- 
sible for approximately 500 
injuries. SportsSafety.org 
and NOAA.gov, suggests 
coaches follow the 30-30 
rule. Count the seconds after 
you see lightning and if you 
hear thunder before 30 sec- 
onds have lapsed, seek safe 
indoor shelter immediately: 
an enclosed vehicle, rest- 
room, or nearby building. 
Dugouts or other "shaded" 
locations may shield you 
from rain but they are not 
considered safe. Wait 30 
minutes or more after the 
last thunder is heard before 
resuming play. If you see 
further thunderstorm clouds 
building, you should wait 
at least another 30 minutes. 
It's important, especially 
if you're the home coach, 
to have a plan in place for 
where you will take players 
and spectators in the event 
of lightning. 

Contagious and Blood 
Borne Diseases 

Communicable (con- 
tagious) diseases and skin 
infections such as MRSA 
are unfortunately common 
when playing sports. Re- 
member the universal hy- 
giene protocol for playing 
sports - shower immediately 
after competition and prac- 
tice, wash all workout cloth- 
ing after each use, wash per- 
sonal gear such as knee pads 
periodically, and don't share 
towels or personal hygiene 
products with others. All of 
these can prevent passing 
skin infections and diseases. 
If you're the coach and no- 



tice a lesion on a player, no- 
tify the parent or guardian. 
Similariy, if you're the par- 
ent or guardian, notify the 
coach. Athletes must have a 
health-care provider evalu- 
ate lesions before returning 
to play. 

When it comes to cuts 
and scrapes, it is important 
that at the first site of blood, 
the player is taken out of the 
game. It is extremely impor- 
tant to never touch blood 
without gloves, to minimize 
the chance of infection. 
When an injury occurs, wash 
the wound with soap and 
water and use clean dress- 
ings to cover the wound. 
If the injury is severe, call 
91 1 or turn the child over to 
their parent. A child should 
not go back into the game 
if they are still bleeding and 
if they do continue playing, 
monitor the wound to make, 
sure it doesn't start bleed- 
ing again. Clothing tainted 
with blood should also be 
removed before resuming 
play to ensure other players 
are not put at risk. 

Stay Hydrat^d 
Dehydration while play- 
ing sports can be a major 
problem and is also easily 
prevented. Try to remem- 
ber the 40/40 rule which is 
to drink 40 ounces of water 
per 40 minutes of exercise. 
If possible, break it down 
by drinking at least eight 
ounces before, 24 during, 
and eight after practice or a 
game. Taking regular breaks 
will also help prevent dehy- 
dration. Sports drinks with 
electrolytes can be a good 



addition to a child's water 
intake because they help 
to replenish nutrients such 
as calcium and potassium. 
Also, remember to never to 
share water bottles or cups 
with others to minimize the 
transfer of colds and virus- 
es. 

Head, Neck 
and Back Injuries 

Helmets when playing 
contact sports are neces- 
sary, but don't be fooled... 
helmets often do not protect 
against neck injuries. High 
- contact sports have the high- 
est risk for cervical spine 
fractures. Children should 
be cautioned that helmets 
don't make them invisible 
and they should still be care- 
ful. Additionally, it's impor- 
tant to routinely check safe- 
ty equipment to make sure it 
is not damaged, and players 
should always be taught the 
proper way to wear safety 
equipment. 

Unfortunately, head inju- 
ries do happen, and players 
should be evaluated imme- 
diately. Whether a concus- 
sion is mild or severe, play- 
ers should not retum to the 
game. Instead, they should 
be treated by a medical 
professional. Additionally, 
back injuries are a common 
problem in sports. If your 
child or player is experienc- 
ing back pain, make sure 
they are properly evaluated 
by a physician to determine 
treatment. 

First Aid Kits and 
Access to Defibrillators 

First aid kits should al- 
ways be on site during 




for the 21st Century 

by Steven A Brustin, D.WLD. 

BRUSH AWAY HEART ATTACKS? 



According to the most recent 
piece of research that links oral 
hygiene with overall health, peo- 
pie may be able to bwer their 
heart attack risk by brushing 
their teeth rriore often. It seems 
that researchers have found that 
people with the most germs in 
their mouths are the most likely 
to experierx^e heart attacks. 
WhUe Tannerella forsynthesis 
arxl Prevotella intemnedia were 
found to be the rrxjst common 
bacteria in the mouths of heart 
attack vKtims, the rrjost con> 
mon indicator of heart attack risk 
was the total amount of bacteria 
in heart patients' nxxjths. With 
this in nwxl, researchers are 
underscoring the importance of 
tooth-bmsNng and regular den- 
tal exams in minimizing heart 
attack risk. 

Ths column on the sig- 
nificaice of tooth brushing has 
been brought to you in the inter- 
est of belter oral heaNh. We use 



the most modem equipment and 
advanced dental techniques in a 
relaxing environment to provkle 
the highest quality dental care to 
all of our patients. Your comfort 
is our highest priority, and we 
strive to offer the very best in all 
of our services to ensure your 
satisfaction and comfort. With 
regular professbnal dental care 
you can become one of the mil- 
Ibns of people who smile with 
confkJence. For more informa- 
tkxi or to schedule an appoint- 
ment, call 617-47W220. We're 
located at 44 Greenleof Street 
We offer the sen/ices of anes- 
thesk)logy with a fully trained 
and qualified anesthesk)k)gist. 
Visit us on the web at www. 
qiwxydentistcom. 

P.S. Severed studies have 
ti(ed gum dStsease with heart 
cSsease, givrig rise to the pos- 
si)iKty that Ixtcteria may sei off 
generalinflaTimation1hat,in1um, 
causes blood to dot 



VOICE 
FOR 



HEALTH 



by Dr. Gabrielle Freedman 

chiropractor i 





EATING VEGETABLES STRENGTHENS BONES 



While numerous studies have 
consistently shown that eating 
fruits and vegetables is good for 
bones, a new study involving 
the natural pigments found in 
plants (called carotenoids) may 
have discovered the reason why. 
The four-year study looked at 
changes in bone mineral density 
at two areas of the hip and lumbar 
spine in hundreds of men and 
women (average age of 75 years). 
Researchers found that carotenoids 
(including alpha-carotene, beta- 
crypt oxan thin ,lycopene ,and lutein 
plus zeaxanthin), particularly 
lycopene, were associated with 
some level of protection against 
losses in bone mineral density at 
the hip in men and at the lumbar 
spine in women. These results 
suggest there is a protective effect 
exerted by carotenoids against 
bone loss in older adults. 

Individuals who are at higher 
risk should be especially attentive 



about taking preventive measures 
and getting tested for early signs of 
bone loss , At FAMILY PRACTICE 
OF CHIROPRACTIC, we provide 
safe and gentle chiropractic 
care for the entire family. We 
take pride in providing you with 
an affordable, convenient, and 
natural health care alternative 
through chiropractic. Rather than 
just treat the symptom, we find the 
underlying cause for your ache or 
pain, and then help to correct it. 
Call 617.472.4220 to schedule an 
appointment and let us help you 
feel better the natural way - the 
chiropractic way. We're located 
at 112 McGrath Hwy., Quincy. 
No matter where you live in 
Eastern Mass., we can offer you 
exceptional chiropractic service. 

PS. There are more than 600 
different types of carotenoids, the red, 
orange, and yellow pigments that give 
plants such as carrots, strawberries, 
and peppers their color 



www.fresdnuHicMroxoni 



practices and games. A 
basic first aid kit includes 
antiseptic, gauze pads, scis- 
sors, adhesive tape, an ace 
bandage, instant cold pack, 
latex gloves, band-aids, pain 
medication such as aspirin, 
tweezers, and sting and bite 
treatment. Check with your 
town or school about the 
availability of heart defibril- 
lators. While these require 
training and can be expen- 
sive, they can save lives. 

The implementation of 
solid safety rules will not 
guarantee your athletes free- 
dom from injury, but it will 
lower the chances of both 
common and serious inju- 





i To Your 

iGood 

iHealth 


by ftiul G. Donohue, M.D. 



There's No 

Age Limit on 

Mammograms 

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: 
I am 81 and have been get- 
ting mammograms for as 
long as I can remember. My 
doctor insists I continue to 
get them. At my age, is it re- 
ally necessary? -A.C. 

ANSWER: I can offer you 
the recommendations com- 
ing from different respected 
sources. They don't all agree 
in all particulars. Did you 
know that half of all breast 
cancers are found in women 
65 and older? A consider- 
able number are diagnosed in 
women in their 80s. 

The American Cancer So- 
ciety says there are no age 
limits for mammograms, and 
women should continue to 
have them if they are in good 
health. The U.S. Preventive 
Services Task Force, a panel 
of experts, tells women to 
have a mammogram yearly or 
every other year if her life ex- 
pectancy isn't limited by other 
diseases. The American Geri- 
atrics Society recommends 
that women 75 and older get 
a mammogram every two to 
three years if they have a life 
expectancy of four or more 
years. Unless studies are done 
that show no benefit to con- 
tinued mammograms, I go 
with those who favor a yearly 
mammogram for all women 
in relatively good health. 

Breast cancer is a topic that 
frightens all women. The book- 
let on that cancer explains it 
and its detection. To obtain a 
copy, write to: Dr. Donohue - 
No. 1101 W, Box 536475, Or- 
lando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose 
a check or money order (no 
cash) for $4.75 U.Si$6 Cana- 
da with the recipient's printed 
name and address. I^ease allow 
four weeks for delivery. 



ries. If you're playing sports 
and you're older, be your 
own advocate. Or if you're 
the parent or guardian of 
a youth playing sports, be 
your child's advocate. Go 
to practices and games, dis- 
cuss practice conditions, 
and teach safe sports rules. 
If a player has an injury or 
isn't feeling well, make sure 
to communicate that to the 
coach. It's a great time of 
year to get outside and play 
sports. Here's wishing you a 
safe and fun season! 

For more information, 
call 617-696-8810 or visit 
www.MiltonHospital.org 
for additional information. 

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: 
My wife has been going 
through menopause for the 
past eight years. We have 
not been intimate through 
these years. When I bring 
up the subject of intimacy, 
she quickly states that she 
doesn't want to talk about 
it. She won't even hug me. 

My wife is only 53 years 
old. It seems like she will be 
going through menopause 
for the rest of her life. I have 
been more than patient, but 
I would like to have my wife 
back. If you could give me 
some advice, it would be 
greatly appreciated. -J.T. 

ANSWER: Menopause 
can lessen sexual drive, 
but it shouldn't completely 
eliminate it, and menopause 
doesn't usually drag on for 
eight years. 

Sexual desire is a com- 
plex process that involves 
hormones, nerves, blood ves- 
sels, general health and the 
brain. The brain is, perhaps, 
the most important element. 
Your wife needs professional 
help. Her total lack of sexual 
desire at a young age and for 
so long could be a physical 
problem, so the family doc- 
tor is the place to start. If, as 
is more likely the case, it is 
a psychological problem, the 
doctor can start treatment for 
that, or can refer her to a spe- 
cialist. 

You have been more than 

patient. 

*** 

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: 
I take a fish-oil supplement 
daily. Can you tell me if 
these tablets contain mercu- 
ry, as some fish do? - P.C. 

ANSWER: Take your fish- 
oil supplement without fear. 
Such supplements contain 
negligible, if any, amounts of 
mercury. They won't make 
you sick. They could make 
you well. 

*** 

Dr. Donohue regrets that he is 
unable to answer individual let- 
ters, but he will incorporate them 
in his column whenever possible. 
Readers may write him or request 
an order form of available health 
newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, 
Orlando. FL 32853-6475. 

C 2009 North America Synd , toe. 
All Rigbu Reserved 



Quincy Community 
United Methodist 

Sunday worship at Coffee hour will be host- 
Quincy Community United ed by Lou Bello, David Em- 
Methodist Church, 40 Beale sheimer and Rich Peterson. 
St., Wollaston, will begin at New Women's food 
10:30 a.m. with Rev. Dr. Su- colleciton for ISS is tuna, 
san F. Jarek-Glidden. salmon, spam, peanut but- 
Adult Bible Study begins ter, jelly and fluff, 
at 9 a.m. All are welcome. 

The lector will be Liz For more information, 

Buccella. Ushers are Wayne call the church at 617-773- 

and Peg McCulley. 3319. 

Vacation Bible School At 
Squantum Christian Fellowship 



Ihursday, .1 uly 23, 2(M)9 The Quincy Sim Page 25 



Celicion 

Quincy Point Congregational 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Squantum Christian Fel- 
lowship announces it will 
hold Vacation Bible School 
July 27-31. 

The theme of this year's 
school is "Crocodile Dock." 
It will run from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon each day for children 
ages 4-11. 

The school will feature 
crafts, Bible songs, food and 
games. 

Kids will also experience 



a sense of purpose as they 
create fleecy Comfort Crit- 
ters for orphans in India. 
Kids will make one turtle to 
keep and one to give away. 

Parents are welcome to 
arrive before noon so they 
can enjoy the daily Firefly 
Finale with photos of their 
kids in action. 

For more information 
or to register, call 617-328- 
8771. 



Sunday worship is at 10 
a.m. at the Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 444 
Washington St. 

All are welcome. 

The Rev. Ann Rearick 
will preach. 

Adam McGhee will 
be the deacon of the day. 
Roxana Bajdechi will be the 
pianist and Bulent Gunerlap 
will be the soloist. 

The church is collecting 
vegetables for Interfaith So- 
cial Services. 

Coffee and refreshments 
will follow the service in so- 
cial hall. 

The church will hold the 
second annual "World of 
Music" summer program 
July 28-30. 

The program is hosted 



by the Quincy Point Con- 
gregational Church uith 
instructors from the church 
and the Quincy Point Music 
Academy 

Ihis year's theme is 
American Song; the experi- 
ence is open to child enter- 
ing grades 1-6. 

Activities include songs 
from American Song book, 
stories, instrument making, 
demonstrations, music ap- 
preciation and movement. 

The grand finale on Jul\ 
30 will be a field trip to 
Symphony Hall. 

Cost is $30 per child and 
$15 for each additional sib- 
ling. 

Registration forms avail- 
able by calling the church 
office at 617-773-6424. * 



Houghs .Neck Congre 
gational rhurch will hold 
lis regular v\()rship service 
Sunday at 9: 30 am. 

All are welcome to attend 
the service 

Pastor John Castricum 
will deliver the sermon "I he 
Fruits oi the Spirit Peace." 
continuing his sermon series 



on the triJits of the spirit as 
outlined b> Paul in the fifth 
chapter in his letter to the 
Galatians 

Sue Rheault and Dick 
Robbins will serve tor the 
l^iaconate 

,\ leliov^ship coffee hour 
uill follou the service 



Bethany Congregational 



Bethan\ Congregational 
Church IS Spear St.. Quin- 
cy Center, will have a Sun 
da> Vvorship Service and 
Church Summer School at 
10a.m. 

The Rev. Garv Smothers 
will preach. 

Childcare will be avail- 
able for infants and tod- 



dlers 

Following the worship 
service, there will be tcl- 
l()v\ship time in the .Allen 
Parlor 

Light refreshments wilJ 
be served. 

All are welcome. 

The church is handi- 
capped accessible. 



First Church Of Squantum 



Youth Chorus Aug. 10 -14 
At Wollaston First Baptist 



Shabbat Experience 
At Arnold Arboretum 



The First Baptist Church 
of Wollaston announces a 
Harmony Youth Chorus will 
be held Aug. 10-14 from 9 
a.m. to noon. 

Boys and girls of all 
faiths and cultures who have 



completed grades 1-7, may 
register. Cost is $25 per 
child, $50 per family. 

Charles Dillingham frt)m 
the Braintree Schools Music 
Department will direct the 
chorus again this summer. 



Rabbi Fred Benjamin of 
Temple Shalom of Milton 
will lead a Family Flora Ac- 
tivity Day and Bring Your 
Own Shabbat Picnic at the 
Arnold Arboretum Friday, 
Aug. 14 from 6: 15 to 8 p.m. 

Challah and grape juice 
will be provided. 



The program is aimed at 
families with young chil- 
dren. 

Cost with advance pay- 
ment by Aug. 11 is $3 per 
familv. Cost that day is $5 
per family. 

For more information, 
call 617-698-3394. 



Sunday worship service 
at First Church of Squan- 
tum, 164 Bellevue Rd,. 
Squantum begins at 10 a.m. 

Coffee and refreshments 



follow the service in the par- 
lor. 

.Men's breakfast is held 
downstairs Saturdavs at 8 
am in Fellowship Hall. 



Vacation Bible School 



The First Baptist Church 
of Wollaston announces Va- 
cation Bible School will be 
held. Aug 10-14 from 9 a.m. 
to 2 p m for children ages 3 
to 6, 



The theme of the bible 
school is Wildwood Forest 

For more information or 
to register, call the church at 

(6ri4'72-0S24 



Assemblies of God 



158 Wdshmgton S'L^uincy 

phone: 773-9797 

Rev. Selwyn Bodley, Senior Pastor 

S unday W orship: 10:30 a.m. 

Christian Ed: Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

Youth Group: Sunday 6 p.m. 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A*Contemporary Worship 
m •Marriage & Family Croup 
■1 •International Fellowship 



Quincy "ReCigion JDirectorym 



Evangelical 



Catholic 



SERVICES & ACTIVITIES 



Congregational 



uantum Christian Fellowship 

t Questions' .:-- iysue s-^.-.e-i 
Sunday V»orship 10 a.m. 
with Pastor Michael Fehan 



Catholic 



St. Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St.. Quincy • 617-773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday 4pm, Sunday 7. 9:30 

& 11:30am. Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 



Sacred Heart Church 

"A Roman Catholic Community wall<ing together 

in Faith, Worship, Education and Service" 

386 Hancock St., North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617)328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) and 5pm 

12 noon at Star of Sea Church 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3 :45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



ST. AGATHA CHURCH 
MILTON-QUINCY 

432 Adams Street 

Milton, MA 021 86 •617-698-2439 

Schedule of Masses 

Saturday: 4:30pm 

Sunday: 7:30am, 9:(X)am (Family Mass), 

10:30am,* 12 noon, 5:00pm 

Weekday Masses: 7:00am and 9:00am 

* Interpreted ASL Mass every 2nd Sunday at 

1 2 ncx)n & assistive devices for the hearing 

impaired available in Sacristy before Masses. 

Hamficapped Accessible, handicapped 

parking, elevator to Ilpper/Lt)wer Churches 

air-conditioned 



St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 
SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:00-3:30 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditioned 



HOUGH'S NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Avenue 

617-479-8778 

www.hncong.org 

Sunday Service 9:30am 

Pastor John Castricum 
fruits of the Spirit: Peace" 



Congregational 




Catholic 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST 

44 School St., Quincy 

617-773-1021 
Weekend Mass Schedule 

Saturday, 4 p.m. 

Sunday, 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 

11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 

Weekday Masses 

Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. 
Handicapped Accessible 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock St., WQllaston 
617-479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. John J. Ronaghan 

Weekend Mass Schedule: 

Saturday 4:00 PM 

Sunday 7:00, 9:00, 11.30AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairlift Available 



Methodist 



A 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston 

617-773-3319 

10:30 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Dr Susan Jarek-Glidden. Pastor 



Bethany 

Congregational 

Church 

Spear & Coddington Streets 
Quincy Center, 617-479-7300 

WWW.QUINCYBKTHANYCHURCH.ORG 

Sunday Communion Worship 
Service & Church School at 10 am 

Rev. Gary W. Smothers 
will preach 

ALL ARE WELCOME! 
Child Care .Available 

Fellowship Time In .Mien Parlor 
Ui>ht Refreshments 

Church is handicapped accessible 



WOLLASTON 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 
United Church of Christ 

48 WinthropAve. • 617-773-7432 

Sunday Summer 
Worship 9 AM 

Rev. Dr. Mary Louise Gilford, 

Senior Pastor 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd,, Wollaston 

Rev. John Swanson. Pastor 

Sunday Worship Service 10 AM 

Ctiurch Office (617) 479-6661 



;ah6^ 






EVANGKLICAL 
CONGREGATIONAL (HI RCH 

fi-^ Ncwhtirx .\\e . \ guirn.\ WX^Z^ri 

Ph -ne h]- S4" -4-U4 

Rev F-ninc!^ Balla.PaMr.r 

Contcmporan Hnrship: Sunda\ :i M^ -\' 

Web site: htlp: m m » .eccquinc\ .com 



Christian Science 



Nazarene 



Wollaston Church 
of the Nazarene 

37 E. Elm Ave., Wollaston ^^^ 

(617) 472-5669 

On The Campus Of 

Eastern Nazarene College 

Pastor: Rev. Fred. Fullerton 

Sunday Sen/ice s 

8:30 am - Holy Communion 

9:45 am - Adult & Children s 

Sunday School 

11 a.m. - Blended Worship Sen/ice 

Come Worship with Us' 



First Church of Christ, Scientist 

20 Greenleaf Street, Quincy 
617-472-0055 



Sunday Services 

and Sunday School 

10:30 a.m. 



Wednesday Evening 

Meetings - where 

testimonies of healing 

are shared 7:30 p.m. 



ALL ARE WELCOME! 




Jewish 



Congregational 



QUINCY POiNT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington St . • 617-773-6424 

Worship and Church School 10 am 

Rev. Ann Suzedell, Pastor 

visit us at www.QPCC.org 



Salvationist 



THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St.. Quincy • 61 7-472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

BRASS BAND MUSIC 

6PM TEEN SALVATION MEETING 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 



Temple Beth EI 

1001 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-479-4309 

Shabbat services — 9: 15 

Sunda\ — 9:00 

An ecalitarian conjireization 




To Advertise in this Directory, 
Call 617-471-3100 



Page 26 Tl&e Quincy Siin Thursday, July 23, 2009 



James A. Hart 

Salesman, US Army Veteran 



A funeral service for 
James A. Hart, of Quincy. 
formerly of North Carolina, 
was conducted July 18 at 
the Keohane Funeral Home, 
Quincy. 

Mr. Handled July 15. 

Born in Detroit. Michi- 
gan, he worked as a sales- 
man for the Seal) Mattress 
Company before retiring 
in 1989 He also enjoyed 
fishmg. gardening and golf. 
He was a dedicated familv 
man. 

He served in the United 
States Army from 1954- 
1956. 

Father of Kelly Meehan 
of Quincy, Casey Hart of CT 
and Shannon Hart Reed of 
WA; brother of Dennis Hart 
of FL, Elizabeth Heckert of 




1 



JAMES A. HART 

AZ. Nancy Ondecker of Ml , 
Mary McGuiness of IN and 
the late William Hart, Robert 
Hart and Janet Hart Brown; 
former husband of Marion 
Hart of Quincy; friend of 
Shirley Issadore of Quincy. 
He is also survived by 
many grandchildren and 
great grandchildren. 



Lisa E. DeCristofaro, 48 

National Sales Manager 



A funeral service for 
Lisa E. (Hellasted) DeCris- 
tofaro, 48, of Middleton, 
NH, formerly of Rockland 
and Quincy, was conducted 
July 17 in Faith Lutheran 
Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. DeCristofaro died 
July 13 at the Frisbie Me- 
morial Hospital, Rochester, 
NH. 

Bom and raised in Quin- 
cy, she graduated from Quin- 
cy High School in 1978 and 
attended Bridgewater State 
College and studied fashion 



She and her family only 
recently decided to perma- 
nently move from Rockland 
to their vacation home on 
Sunrise Lake in Middleton, 
NH. 

Mrs. DeCristofaro was a 
longtime member of Faith 
Lutheran Church in Quincy 
and was a longtime support- 
er of Camp Calumet in West 
Ossipee,NH. 

Wife of David DeCristo- 
faro; mother of Damara De- 
Cristofaro of Rl and Danette 
DeCristofaro of Middleton; 
daughter of Vivian McLeod 



in Paris. She worked in the 

toy industry for many years, of Quincy. 

serving 20 years with Mat- Funeral arrangements 

tel. More recently, she took were made by the Keohane 

over national sales for Inter- Funeral Home, Quincy. 

national Playthings. 




A Thoi/ght 



PATIENCE . . . What a word. . . Much 
has been written and said about this 

eight lettered word 

It has been said that many a man 
thinks he is patiently when, in reality, 
SCOTT DEWARE he is indifferent. It has also been said 
that many a person takes credit for being patient when they 
are simply putting off doing something unpleasant . . .And 
then there is an old Dutch proverb which states: *'An ounce 
of patience is worth a pound of brains.'' 

We especially Uke this quotation written by David Samoff : 
'Tatience is a two-sided coin. If patience is to be a virtue 
it must be employed in a willingness to obtain all the facts, 
to deduce from the facts what should be done, if anything, 
and to act in time and not too early or too late. If patience 
is merely to be used as an excuse for inaction, and if you 
don't do anything but wait - and you wait too long and the 
opportunity is past - or if you convert it into lethargy or 
inaction, then that is the other side of the coin." 

Deware Funeral Home 

Service Beyond Expectations 



WoUaston Chapel 
576 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02 170 

(617) 472-1137 



Dignity. 



Affordability Plus Service 

Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 

A Service Family Affiliate ofAFFS and Service Corp. Int. 

206 Winter Street • FaU River, MA 02720 » (508) 676-2454 



Obituaries 

Carlton Fickett, 94 

Worked At Fore River Shipyard 

A funeral service for Car- 
leton Fickett, 94, of Wey- 
mouth, formerly of Quincy 
and Lubec, Maine, was con- 
ducted Wednesday in the 
Hamel, Wickens & Iroupe 
Funeral Home, Quincy Cen- 
ter. 

Mr. Fickett died July 
16 at the Colonial Nursing ^^^ 

Home, Weymouth. ^k\ llf^ 

Born in Lubec, Maine, . ^^k rilH' ^f 

he graduated from Lubec | ^^JJJHv €^ ■ 

High School and Sir George CARLTON FICKETT 

Williams Business College, of Hingham and Peter Fick- 
Montreal. He had worked ett and his wife Ann of NH; 
for the Fore River Shipyard grandfather of Amy Marie 
as a shipyard worker for 41 Yu of Cambridge, Elizabeth 
years. He belonged to the Helton of Quincy and Mat- 
Old Colony Sportsmen's thew Fickett of NH. 
Club and the South Shore 
Camera Club. 

Husband of the late Es- 
ther Fickett ; brother of Helen 
Small of FL; father of Susan 
Smith and her husband Gary your choice. 

Peter J. Molinaro, 91 

Worked At Fore River Shipyard 

A private funeral service Northbridge; grandfather 
for Peter J. Molinaro, 91, of of Michael P., Steven A. 




Interment was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery, Quin- 
cy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the charity of 



Quincy, was held recendy. 

Mr. Molinaro died July 
10 at the Quincy Rehabilita- 
tion and Nursing Center. 

Bom in Boston, he lived 
all of his life in Quincy and 



and Marisa E. Molinaro; 
brother of Thomas Nigro, 
Jr., Francis Nigro and the 
late Lena Pica, Sal Nigro, 
Mary Moscone, William, 
Jennie, Frank and Charles 



graduated from Quincy Nigro, Anna Fuller, Mary, 

Trade School. He worked at Mariano, Elizabeth Carini 

the Fore River Shipyard for and Julia Hanson. 

40 years and was a member He is also survived by 

of St. Joseph's Holy Name many nieces and nephews. 

Society. Funeral arrangements 

Husband of the late Mary were made by the Dennis 

D. (DelVecchio) Molinaro; Sweeney Funeral Home, 

father of Peter J. Molinaro, Quincy. 
Jr. and his wife Donna of 

Eleanor Main Rossignol 

Manager For Ross Window Co. 

funeral service for penter of CO and Dianne 



A runerai service 
Eleanor Main Rossignol, 
of Quincy, was conducted 
Monday at Christ Church 
Episcopal, Quincy. 

Mrs. Rossignol died July 
11 at Boston Medical Cen- 
ter. 

A lifelong resident of 
Quincy, she worked for the 
family business as manager 
for Ross Window Company. 
She was also a member of 
Christ Church, Quincy. 

Wife of the late Louis 



M. Rossignol of NY; grand- 
mother of Nicole, Sabrina, 
Brandon and Ellyse; great 
grandmother of Ella; daugh- 
ter of the late Lillian B. 
Stewart. 

Interment was in the MA 
National Cemetery, Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hamel, 
Wickens & Troupe Funeral 
Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Christ Church 



Edna Ruth Topping, 91 

Hairdresser 



A memorial service for 
Edna Ruth (Smith) Topping, 
91 , of Brockton, formerly of 
Quincy and Palm Harbor. 
FL, was conducted 1 uesday 
in the First Baptist Church 
of Braintree. 

Mrs. Topping died June 
25. 

Born in Prince Edward 
Island, Canada and came 
to Massachusetts with her 
family as a young child. She 
worked as a hairdresser in 
Quincy for many years and 
was a lifetime member of 
the Eastern Star and Esther's 
M's. She was also active in 
many volunteer associations 
and enjoyed playing bingo. 

Wife of the late Stewart 
E. Topping, Sr.; mother of 
Stewart E. Topping, Jr. and 
his wife Carolyn of AL, 
Ruth M. Anthony of East 
Bridgewater and Cheryl T. 
Dugan and her husband Pe- 
ter of MN; sister of Lillian 
Hardy of Plymouth and the 
late Francis Smith, Milton 




EDNA RUTH TOPPING 

Smith, Louis Smith, Marion 
Fawcett and Bertha McAl- 
ister. 

She is also survived by 
11 grandchildren and nine 
great grandchildren and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Mt. 
Hope Cemetery, Mattapan. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hamel, 
Wickens & Troupe Funeral 
Home, Quincy Center. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Resident 
Council at Baypointe Re- 
hab & Nursing Home, 50 
Christy's Place, Brockton, 
MA 02401 . 



Mabel E. Marum 

Administrative Assistant 
For Keohane Funeral Home 



A funeral Mass for Ma- 
bel E. (Ralph) Marum, of 
Braintree, formerly of Fall 
River, was celebrated Tues- 
day in St. Clare's Church, 
Braintree. 

Mrs. Marum died July 
16. 

She had worked as an 
administrative assistant for 
Keohane Funeral Home in 
Quincy for many years. She 
was also past president and 
member of the Braintree 
Women's Club, the South 
Shore Country Club and she 
was a member of the Red 
Hat Society. 

Wife of the late James J. 
Marum; mother of Sharon 



Femandes of Stoughton, 
Cheryl Coppens of Duxbury, 
Lynn Warren of Weymouth, 
Gayle Carson of Quincy and 
James R. Marum of Brain- 
tree. 

She is also survived by 
12 grandchildren and four 
great-grandchildren. 

Interment was in May- 
flower Cemetery, Duxbury. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations 

may be made to the Spe- 
cial Olympics of MA, PO 
Box 303, Hawthome, MA 
01937. 



Eleanor P. Morrill, 83 

Department Manager for NE Telephone 



Rossignol, WWII Veteran; Episcopal, 12 Quincy Ave, 
mother of Elaine C. Car- Quincy, MA 02169. 



A Mass of Christian 
Burial for Eleanor "Nell" 
"Kerry" P. (Little) Morrill, 
83, of West Quincy, was 
celebrated Monday in St. 
Mary's Church, West Quin- 
cy. 

Mrs. Morrill died July 
15 at Marina Bay Nursing 



Funerals • Cremations • Prearrangements 




DENNIS SWEENEY FUNERAL HOME 

Quincy 's First for Three Generations 

Dennis S. Sweeney 

Funeral Director 

74 Elm Street, Quincy Massachusetts 02169 • 6\1'113-212S 
www.dennissweeneyfuneralhome.com 



Home, Quincy. 

Bom in County Cork, 
Ireland, she was a gradu- 
ate of Quincy High School 
and retired as a department 
manager from New England 
Telephone and Telegraph af- 
ter a 37-year career. She was 
also a Boston sports fan, an 
accomplished golfer and 
loved to work in her garden 
and telling stories. 

Wife of Paul Morrill; sis- 
ter of the late Thomas, Fran- 
cis, John, William, Kevin 
and Noel Little and Mary 
Spellman and Bridgette 
McGovem; daughter of the 
late Thomas E. and Ellen F. 
(O'Brien) Little. 

She is also survived by 
several nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in St. 
Mary's Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral arrangdraents 
were made by the Dolan Fu 
neral Home, Milton. 



Thursday, July 23, 2009 Tlie QuiAcy Sun Page 27 



Jill Lee Williams, 29 

Worked at Stop & Shop 



Daniel J. Kelly, Jr. 

Carpenter 



Ralph J. Buckley, 79 

Retired Quincy Firefighter, US Army Veteran 



A funeral Mass for Jill 
Lee Williams , 29. of Quincy, 
was celebrated Monday in 
St. John the Baptist Church, 
Quincy. 

Ms. Williams died July 
14. 

Born in Boston, she 
was raised in Quincy and 
graduated in 2000 from the 
American School for the 
Deaf in West Hartford. CT. 
She had lived in Quincy for 
27 years. She was employed 
for the Stop & Shop Com- 
pany at the Southern Artery 
Quincy location for the past 
10 years. 

She was also a member 
of the St. John the Baptist 
Church Bible Study pro- 
gram and enjoyed reading, 
the movies and tigers and 
was a Boston Red Sox fan. 

Daughter of Debra C. 
(Williams) Gilcoine and 
her husband William of 
Quincy and the late Bren- 
dan M. Donovan; sister of 
Mary L. Gilcoine and Beth 
A. Gilcoine. both of Quincy; 
granddaughter of Ida E. Gil- 
coine and the late William 
F. Gilcoine, Ralph S. Wil- 
liams and the late Roberta 
Williams, Frank McGurr of 




JILL LEE WILLIAMS 

South Boston and the late 
Madeline J. McGurr, Elinor 
Quigley of Quincy and Da- 
vid Quigley; grandniece of 
Richard and Colleen Phil- 
lips of Whitman. 

She is also survived by 
many aunts, uncles and 
cousins. 

Interment was in Pine 
Hill Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funer- 
als, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the St. Vincent 
de Paul Society, c/o St. John 
the Baptist Church, 21 Gay 
St., Quincy, MA 02169. 



A funeral Mass for Dan- 
iel J. Kelly, Jr., of Quincy, 
formerly of Dorchester, 
was celebrated July 18 in 
Our Lady of Ciood Counsel 
Church, Qumcy. 

Mr, Kelly died July 15. 

He had worked as a car- 
penter for Local #33 Boston 
and retired in 1978 after 30 
years. He then began work- 
ing for Polaroid where he 
continued working for an- 
other 10 years, retiring in 
1988. 

Mr. Kelly was a Boston 
sports fan, enjoyed fish- 
ing, bowling and playing 
cards and was a member of 
the John P. McKeon Post 
in Dorchester and a former 
member of St. Brendan's 
Holy Name Society. 

Husband of Frances G. 
(Shields) Kelly; father of 
Daniel J. Kelly. Ill and his 
wife Carole of Leominster, 
Thomas M. Kelly of Quincy 
and Mary Frances and her 
husband Edward Amrock. 
Jr., of Rockland; son of the 




UAMELJ.KELLY.JR. 

late Daniel and Evelyn (7en- 
nihan) Kelly; brother of the 
late Evelyn Hennessy and 
Jeanne Flanagan, grandfa- 
ther of Tanya, Timothy. Ni- 
cole and Thomas Kelly. 

He is also survived by 
many nieces and nephews. 

Interment was in Pme 
Hill Cemetery, Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Sisters of St. 
Joseph of Boston, 637 Cam- 
bridge St.. Brighton. MA 
02135. 



Helen C. Dredge, 88 

Secretary, US Navy Veteran, 
Worked For The Boston Traveler 



A funeral Mass for Hel- 
en C. (Brennan) Dredge, 
88, of California, formerly 
of Quincy and Weymouth, 
will be celebrated July 3 1 in 
Mary Star of the Sea Catho- 
lic Church, La Jolla, CA. 

Mrs. Dredge died June 2. 

Bom in Boston, she lived 
across from Black's Creek 
in Quincy as a child. She at- 
tended St. John's Catholic 
School before she moved to 
Dorchester and later gradu- 
ated from Girls High School 
and Katherine Gibbs School 
in Boston. 

She worked as a secre- 
tary at Sparhawk Hall in 
Ogunquit, ME before join- 
ing Skating Magazine, and 
later, the advertising depart- 
ment of The Boston Trav- 
eler. She was one of the first 
women to enlist in the Unit- 
ed States Navy as a member 
ofthe WAVES in 1942. She 
was stationed at the 1 1'^ Na- 
val District Headquarters in 
San Diego where she served 
as a Flag Yeoman for the ad- 
miral. 

5he married the late Wil- 
liam C. Dredge, Jr., former 
Automotive Editor of The 
Los Angeles Times. They 
raised six children. The 
family lived in San Diego 
and Los Angeles for nearly 
20 years before moving to 
the Midwest and later Flor- 
ida. Mrs. Dredge returned to 
Quincy in 1973 and joined 
David L. Babson & Compa- 
ny in Boston and held sev- 
eral administrative positions 
there until retiring in 1983. 

She also enjoyed sewing. 



knitting and needlecrafts. 
She played the violin and 
piano, enjoyed bride and 
whist, and later completing 
large picture puzzles with 
friends. She was a volunteer 
at her parish church in La 
Jolla, the San Diego Cathe- 
dral and the Catholic Dio- 
cese of San Diego. She en- 
joyed working with young 
children and was a volunteer 
tutor in the Washington El- 
ementary School of central 
San Diego. 

Wife of the late William 
C. Dredge, Jr.; sister of the 
late Mary E. Brennan of 
Quincy; mother of Christine 
M. Dredge of CA, Lisa A. 
Camp of Grovel and. Wil- 
liam C. Dredge, 111 of Wl, 
Phyllis E. Brennan of CO. 
Polly B. Dredge of VA and 
the late Rosemary (Dredge) 
Lavin of NY. 

She is also survived by 
15 grandchildren and nine 
great grandchildren. 

Interment with Military 
Honors will be in Ft. Rose- 
crans National Cemetery. 
San Diego. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Mary Star of the 
Sea Church in La Jolla. or to 
the Salvation Army. 



Carol A. Connor, 66 

Retired Registered Nurse 

A Mass of Christian Buri- late John and Ann (Warren) 
al for Carol A. (Donnelly) Donnelly of Charlestown; 
Connor. 66. of Quincy. will sister of Ellen Marie Raso 
be celebrated today (Thurs- of Medford; aunt of John 
day) at 9 a.m. in St. Mary's Raso of Medford. Lynne M. 
Church. West Quincy. Koeller and Carol A Smith. 
Mrs. Connor died July both of North Reading and 
19. Stephen W. Raso of Haver- 
Bom and raised in Charle- hill, 
stown. she was a longtime Visiting hours were held 
resident of Quincy. She was Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. 
a retired registered nurse, at the Dolan Funeral Home. 



having worked at Boston 
City Hospital . 

Wife of Thomas P. Con- 
nor; mother of Thomas P. 



Milton. 

Interment will be in Pine 
Hill Cemetery. Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 



Connor of Quincy, Karen be to the Humane Society 

M. Vasselian of Abington of the US HSUS. Dept 

and William C. Connor and GA1T04. 2100 L Street. NW, 

Kerry A. Reilly, both of Washington, DC. 20037. 
Randolph; daughter of the 



A funeral Mass for Ralph 
J Buckley, 79. of Braintree. 
formerly of Quincy and 
Neponset. a retired Quincy 
firefighter, was celebrated 
Monday in St Joseph's 
Church. Quincy. 

.Mr Buckley died Jul) 15 
at the Quinc) Medical Cen 
ter. 

Born in Boston, he \vas 
raised and educated in .Nep- 
onset schools He attended 
Massasoit Community Col- 
lege and I'Mass Dartmouth, 
earning his degree in hire 
Science. He had lived in 
Braintree for 28 years, pre- 
viously in Quinc) and .Nep- 
onset. 

He was a Quincy fire- 
fighter for 29 years; he was 
appointed to the Department 
on Feb. 5. 1955 and retired 
on Aug. 31. 1984. During 
his career he served on Lad- 
der 5 in North Quincy. Lad- 
der 2 in Wollaston and Lad- 
der 4 in Houghs Neck. His 
last assignment was as an 
inspector with the Fire Pre- 
vention Bureau. He was also 
a member of Local 792 and 
the Quincy Fireman's Relief 
Association. 

Mr. Buckley was a World 
War II and Korean War Dis- 
abled L.S Arm) veteran. 
During World War 11 he 
served with the Army of Oc- 
cupation in Japan and in the 
Korean War with the Army 
of Occupation in Germany. 
He was also a member of 
DAV Braintree Chapter #29 
and the Neponset VFW. 

He enjoyed boating, fish- 
ing, sports and reading. 

Husband of Marguerite 
A. "Margie" (Divers) Buck- 
ley; father of Stephen E 




RALPH .i.BKKLLV 

Buckle) and his wife Kath- 
erine of W hitman, grandfa- 
ther of Stephen J Buckley. 
R)an E Buckle\ and Dil- 
Ion W Buckley; brother of 
Edward C Buckle). W FD 
(Ret ). and his wife Carol 
of .North We) mouth. Ruth 
Hackett and her late hus- 
band Walter of North Wey- 
mouth. Patncia Hackett and 
her husband Fred of South 
Weymouth. Joan Salvaggio 
and her husband Robert, 
Capt QFD (Ret ) of Rock- 
land. Noreen Tilley and her 
late husband Robert of Wey- 
mouth and the late .Mane 
Dwver and her late husband 
Jack. QFD (Ret ). 

He IS also survived b) 
man) nieces and nephews 

Interment with .Military 
Honors was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery. Braintree 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for Funer- 
als. Quincy. 

Memorial donafions may 
be made to the Quincy Fire- 
man's Relief Associafion, 
CO QFD. 40 Quinc) Ave. 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



Robert B. 
Stafford, 88 

A memorial service for 
Robert B. Stafford, 88. of 
Quincy, will be conducted 
at a later date. 

Mr. Stafford died June 20 
at the Queen Ann's Nursing 
Home, Hingham. 

He was a World War II 
veteran. 

Husband of Doris 
Stafford of Quincy. 

He is also survived by 
one brother, one sister and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the O'Keefe- 
Waite Funeral Home. Taun- 
ton. 

Other Obituaries 
On Page 29 



Graiiiipa loved 
gardening, baseball, 
and playing the 

* 

harmonica. 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Service, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
^ 0^ Whether it's gathering some oi 
the flowers he so tenderly 
fMH^fei^ cultivated or finding ^,^ 

a musician to play 





Honor Your 
Loved One's 

Memory 
With Flowers 

cliffords.com 

1.800.441.8884 




^'Take Me Out to f^. - 




the Ball Game" on the 
harmonica, you can count on us to help 
you plan a service that will be just as 
unique as the person you love. 



^5fe^ 785 Hancock Street • 



uneraf (Service 

Quincy 617-773-3551 



Member by Invitation 



National Selected Morticians 



Page 2H Tl^e Quincy 4Sim ThuKday, July 23^ 2009. 






KING Crossword 



HOCUS -FOCUS 



BY 



HENRY BOLTINOFF 



ACROSS 

1 Cried like a 

crow 
6 Sweet potato 
9 Plead 

12 Open- 
mouthed 

13 Microbrewery 
product 

14 Ostrich's kin 

15 Gondolier, 
typically 

16 "Ben-Hur" 
author 

18 Race place 

20 Augments, 
with "out" 

21 Long March 
leader 

23 Copperhead? 

24 Thing of 
value 

25 Heidi's home 
27 Some exams 
29 Grated 

31 Petunia, for 

one 
35 That is (Lat.) 

37 Church 
section 

38 New again 



41 Congregant's 
seat 

43 Started 

44 Bocelli solo 

45 Breakfast 
option 

47 Southern 

Belgian 
49 Lessen 

52 Superlative 
ending 

53 Disencumber 

54 Emphasize 
slyly 

55 In medias — 

56 Golfer Ernie 

57 Fashion 

DOWN 

1 Upper limit 

2 Past 

3 Belts 

4 Duel tool 

5 Skin(Suff.) 

6 Bored one 

7 Remark re 
Yorick 

8 He spoke for 
Bugs 

9 Birds' bills 
10 Host 



11 Visitor 
17 Textbook 

chapter 
19 Home 

21 Scratch 

22 Miss, 
neighbor 

24 The whole 

shooting 

match 
26 Helix 
28 Following 
30 Tokyo, once 

32 Midsize 
kangaroo 

33 Prior night 

34 Wine option 
36 Pays out 

38 Less refined 

39 Obliterate 

40 Isn't 
perpendicular 

42 Sports 

45 Spring wind? 

46 Touch 
48 Tramcar 

contents 

50 Up to, in 
verse 

51 Compass pt. 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




6 
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7 


8 


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10 


11 


12 










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17 








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28 




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30 








32 


33 


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39 


40 




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44 








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46 


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47 








48 








49 




50 


51 


52 
55 




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54 












■ 


56 


57 











© 2009 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



Wishing 


1 


S Well® 


8 4 7 6 3 4 2 
T A A B L M T 


7 
C 


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Y A R U 


4 2 6 4 3 4 5 
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A E G S E 


5 4 7 5 7 6 4 
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5 
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HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will give you a 
message every day. it's a numerical puzzle designed to spell 
d^ your fortune. Coi^t the tetters in your first name. If ttie 
number of tetters is 6 or more, subtract 4. If the number is tess 
than 6. add 3. The result is your key number Start at the up- 
per lefl-hand comer arid check one of your key numbers, tefi 
to right. Then rrad tfie message the letters under the 
checked figures give you. 

« 2009 King fmtuum Syndlctte. Inc world ngho reservad 



V— VJ, 




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Trivid 

test byFifij 
Rodnguez 



1. HUMAN ANATOMY: 
What is the common name 
for tarsi? 

2. ANIMAL KINGDOM: 
What is the average 
lifespan of a housefly? 

3. MOVIES: What was the 
name of the volleyball that 
became Tom Hanks' com- 
panion in "Cast Away"? 

4. MEASURES: How 
much beer would a firkin 
hold? 

5. MYTHOLOGY: What 
area of life did the Roman 
goddess Discordia rule? 

6. BIBLE: Which of the 
Ten Commandments for- 
bids thievery? 

7. U.S. CITIES: What is 
the capital of Vermont? 



MAGIC MAZE 



8. GEOGRAPHY: What 
is the basic currency of 
North Korea? 

9. ASTROLOGY: What is 
Libra's symbol? 

10. LITERATURE: What 
famous author went by the 
pseudonym of "Boz"? 

Answers 

1. Ankles 

2. About two to three 
weeks 

3. Wilson 

4. Nine gallons 

5. Strife or disorder 

6. Eighth Commandment: 
"You shall not steal" 

7. Montpelier 

8. The won 

9. The scales 

10. Charles Dickens 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



RED GRAPE 
VARIETIES 



ECZXVTRPNLJNYHE 
CSMACYWVTRHARYS 
PNERDEVRUOMRLKO 
CORVI I BGEAE ICGG 
ABLZOOXLGGWSURE 
B S O Q (Z I N F A N D eT) E D 
ERTPIOGTOMMTLNL 
RJIGTBONOEDIBAO 
NAYRXNBWANUTTCR 
ESOQI POENS I ELHE 

TNKPOLL INARPMET 

Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directiom - 
fbrward. backward, up, down uid diajtonally. 

Gamay Mourv6dre Pinot Noir Tempranillo 

Grenache Nebbiolo Pinotage Teroldego 

Malbec Norton Sangiovese Zinfandel 

Merlot Petite Siran Syrah 

£ 2009 King Features Syndicate. Inc. World rights reserved 



Salomes 

Stars 



ARIES (March 21 to April 

19) Your Aries leadership qual- 
ities can help bring order out of 
all that confusion, whether it's 
on the job or in the home. But 
be careful to guide, not goad, 
others into following you. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 

20) Applying a more personal 
view to a job-linked issue could 
help provide better insight into 
those persistent problems. Use 
your keen Taurean logic to cut 
through the double-talk. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 
20) Taking some time off could 
be the best way to get through 
that seemingly endless round 
of demands. You'll return re- 
freshed and ready to tackle 
things from a new perspective. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) Restoring a sagging profes- 
sional relationship takes a lot of 
effort. By all means, state your 
position. But also make sure 
you pay close attention to the 
other person's point of view. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
A hot prospect intrigues the Big 
Cat, who is always on the prowl 
for a promising investment. But 
be careful that this "promise" 
has a chance of being kept. 
Check it out more carefully. 

VIRGO (August 23 to Sep- 
tember 22) A friend could use 
some of your compassion and 
concern. If he or she doesn't 
ask for help, be sure you step 
up and make the first move. 
Also, check out a new career 
possibility. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) You might have 
difficulty getting your opin- 
ions heard because of all the 
noise being made by the other 



side. But hang in there. Others 
should line up with you once 
they learn the facts. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) Offering to help 
a colleague is commendable. 
But before you commit your 
time and effort, check to see if 
that person's situation is all that 
he or she has led you to believe 
it is. 

SAGITTARIUS (Novem 
ber 22 to December 21) You 
should scx)n be seeing positive 
results from your recent efforts 
on behalf of a family member. 
On another matter, check that 
you have all the facts regarding 
a job assignment. 

CAPRICORN (December 
22 to January 19) Your aspects 
favor closer family relation- 
ships this week. Take time for 
visits, whether in person, by 
phone, by mail or in cyber- 
space. Let them know how im- 
portant they are to you. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) A missed oppor- 
tunity isn't always a negative. 
Maybe your instincts are telling 
you not to rush into something 
you "thought" was worthwhile. 
Make time lor family this 
weekend. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) Your sense of humor 
helps you get through a tricky 
situation. But some stick-in-the- 
muds might not be so willing to 
make the changes that you and 
others agree are necessary. 

BORN THIS WEEK: You 

have a gift for making everyone 
you know - or even just met ~ 
feel important and welcome in 
your life. 

© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



CryptoQuip 

This Is a simple substitution cipher in which each letter used stands 

for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout 

the puzzle. Solution is accomplished by trial and error. 

Clue: K equals G 
PY J UMAM GPM VB 

KJUKBANG TNQJFN J 

CBEQRMJU JOEBA, 

BRMVOI RN TN UJFNI 



CGNAAE TME YGNVI? 



1 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. 



King Crossword 
ANSWERS 



Magic Maze 
ANSWERS: 



Solution time: 27 mins. RED GRAPE VA RIETIES 



3 


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Cyptoquip 
ANSWER: 
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'lsA|BUBoqoAsd e aiuBoaq ja;s6uB6 snouojou e j| 



Thursday, Joly 23, 2009 Tli« Qulnoy Stin P«ge2f 



Obituaries 



Peter G. Ryan 



Anna Falco, 97 

Worked At Schraft's Candy Factory 



Christopher A. Archer, 43 

Sales, Marketing Director 



A Mass of Christina 
Burial for Anna "Non- 
nie" (Arena) Falco, 97, of 
Quincy, will be celebrated 
today (Thursday) at 10 
a.m. in Holy Trinity Parish, 
Our Lady of Good Counsel 
Church, Quincy. 

Mrs. Falco died July 20. 

Born and raised in Bos- 
ton, she was a former Ray- 
theon employee and moved 
to Quincy 30 years ago to 
care for her daughter, who 
was suffering from cancer, 
and her grandchildren. 




ANNA FALCO 



Arena. 



A funeral service for 
Christopher A. Archer, 43, 
of Quincy, will be conduct- 
ed today (Thursday) at I 
p.m. in the South Weymouth 
Church of the Nazarene, 
South Weymouth. 

Mr. Archer died July 18. 

Born in Hartford, CT, he 
was the Director of Sales 
and Marketing at Travel 
Marketing Services, Ltd., 
in Canton. He also was an 
adventurer and loved to play 




CHRLSTOPHER ARCHER 

Catherine A. Landschoot of 
NY. 

He is also survived by 14 



tennis, golf and cycling, nieces and nephews. 



She is also survived by He was a 1984 graduate of 



She enjoyed knitting and eight grandchildren and 10 North Quincy High School 



crocheting and also loved greatgrandchildren. 

to travel, taking trips to Ha- Visiting hours were held 

waii, Ireland, Italy and Flor- Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. at 

ida while also volunteering the Lydon Chapel for Funer- 

with the Meals on Wheels als, Quincy. 

program. Interment will be in Oak 

Mother of Joseph and his Grove Cemetery, Medford. 
wife Eileen of Dennis, Paul Memorial donations may 

and his wife Gail of FL and be made to the South Shore 



the late Loretta Cristiani and 
her husband, the late Nicho- 
las Cristiani, Sr.; sister of 
Michael Arena of Hoi brook, 
Salvatore Arena of Boston, 
Charles Arena of Medford 



Elder Services' Meals on 
Wheels Program, 159 Bay 
State Dr., Braintree, MA 
02184 or to the American 
Cancer Society, c/o Patrick 
Connors and The Pink La- 



and the late Josephine Are- dies of Braintree, 5 Manley 



na, Vincenza "Jenny" DiS- 
tasio and Leo and Anthony 

George E. 
Doherty, 80 

Salesman 

A funeral Mass for 
George E. Doherty, 80, of 
Quincy, will be celebrated 
today (Thursday) at 10:30 
a.m. in St. Mary's Church, 
West Quincy. 

Mr. Doherty died July 
20. 

Bom in Dorchester, he 
moved to Quincy as a teen- 
ager and lived here all his 
life. He was a salesman for 
Topps Inc, and was a past 
president of the New Eng- 
land Confectionery Sales- 
men's Club. 

Husband of the late Con- 
stance "Connie" (Daly) 
Doherty; father of Stephen 
J. Doherty of New Bed- 
ford, John G. Doherty and 
his wife Judith of Beverly, 
James E. Doherty and his 
wife Sue of Stoughton and 
the late Michael P. Doherty; 
grandfather of Jennifer, Ja- 
nean, Keith, Paul, Caroline, 
Brendon, Michelle and Jil- 
lian; great grandfather of 
Alyssa Barry. 

Visiting hours were held 
Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. at 
the Dennis Sweeney Funeral 
Home, Quincy Center. 

Interment will be in St. 
Mary's Cemetery, West 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to the Autism Sup- 
port Center, 6 Southside Rd., 
Danvers,MA01923. 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



St., West Bridgewater, MA 
02739. 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

Docket No. NO09P1704EA 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

Norfolk Probate 

and Family Court 

35 Shawmut Road 

Canton, MA 02021 

In the Estate of: 

Frances L. Fernandez a/k/a 

Frances Lena Fernandez 

Late of: Quincy, MA 02169 

Date of Death; 01/26/2009 

To all persons interested in 
the above captioned estate, a 
petition has been presented 
requesting that a document 
purporting to be the last will 
of said decedent be proved 
and allowed and that James 
P. Fernandez of Franklin, MA 
be appointed executor/trix, 
named in the will to serve 
Without Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
Oa/1 9/2009 . 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. Robert 
W. Langlols, First Justice 
of this Court. 

Date: July 8, 2009. 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
7/23/09 



and attended Eastern Naza- 
rene College. 

Husband of Chariene 
(Delp) Archer of Quincy; 
father of Curran M. Archer 
of Quincy; son of Edmond 
Archer of FL and the late 
Janice Archer; brother of 



Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Dana Farber 
Cancer Institute, Contnbu- 
tions Services-Brain Tumor 
Research, 10 Brookline 
Place West, Brookline, MA 
02445. 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR APPOINTMENT 

OF ADMINISTRATOR 

Docket No. NO09P1708EA 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

35 Shawmut Road 

Canton, MA 02021 

In the Estate of: 

Phyllis A. Theod 

Late of: Quincy MA 02169 

Date of Death: 05/29/09 

To all persons interested in 

the above captioned estate, a 

petition has been presented 

requesting that Richard M. 

McLeod of Braintree, MA or 

some other suitable person 

be appointed administrator 

of said estate to serve With 

Personal Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 

8/19/2QQ9 
WITNESS, Hon. Robert 



NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR APPOINTMENT 

OF ADMINISTRATOR 

Docket No. NO09P1752EA 

Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

The Trial Court 

Probate and Family Court 

35 Shawmut Road 

Canton, MA 02021 

In the Estate of: 

Diane M. Deshler 

Late of: Quincy MA 02170 

Date of Death: 04/10/2009 

To all persons interested in 

the above captioned estate, a 

petition has been presented 

requesting that William P. 

Deshler of Quincy, MA or 

some other suitable person 

be appointed administrator of 

said estate to serve Without 

Surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
Canton ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
MORNING (10:00AM) ON 
a/26/2009 . 
WITNESS, Hon. Robert 



W. Langlols, First Justice W. Langlois, First Justice 
of this Court. of this Court 

Date: July 9, 2009. Date: July 1 5, 2009 

PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 

7/23/09 



PATRICK W. McDERMOTT 
Register of Probate 
7/23/09 



A Memorial Mass for 
Peter G. Ryan, of Quincy 
and Wellfleet, will be cel- 
ebrated Fnday at 11 am. m 
Our Lady of Good Counsel 
Church, Quincy. 

Mr. Ryan died July 19. 

He worked for the MBTA 
as a Trackman for 32 years, 
retiring in 1997 He was 
past president of the Manet 
Communit) Health Center 
and Atherton Hough PTA 
He was also on the Par- 
ish Council at Our Lad\ 
of Good Counsel where he 
also coached basketball, 
taught CCD. and facilitated 
pre-cana classes for man> 



master carpenter 

Husband of Noreen (Mc- 
Nulty) Ryan of Quincy, fa- 
ther of Kathleen Ryan San- 
chez and her husband John 
of TX and Peter G Ryan and 
his wife Kelly of Medford, 
grandfather of Kaitlin and 
John Peter .Sanchez of TX 
and .Madeline and Catherine 
Ryan of .Medford. brother ol 
.Michael R R\an and John P 
Ryan . 

Visiting hours are loda\ 
( Ihursdav) from 4-8 p.m. at 
the Keohane Funeral Home. 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations ma> 
be made to Pan -.Mass Chal- 
lenge. 77 Fourth Ave. Need- 



years. 

Mr. Ryan also enjoyed ham Heights, MA 02494 
playing cards, traveling. 
)laying golf and he was a 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR APPOINTMENT OF 

GUARDIAN OF 
MENTALLY RETARDED 
PERSON 
Docket No. NO09P1618GD 
Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts 
The Trial Court 
Probate and Family Court 
35 Shawmut Road 
Canton, MA 02021 
In the matter of: 
Eleanor Mary Brooits 
a/k/a Mary Brooks 
Of: Quincy MA 
To the above named ward, 
her spouse, and heirs appar- 
ent or presumptive, a petition 
has been filed in the above 
captioned matter alleging that 
said ward of Quincy, MA is 
a mentally retarded person 
to the degree that she is in- 
capable of making informed 
decisions with respect to 
the conduct of her personal 
affairs and requesting that 
Elizabeth E. Tufankjian of 
Scituate, MA or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
guardian of the person: to 
serve